0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by yj on 03 Nov 2016

Manufacturing process of carbon arrow shaft,How the arrow shaft be made ?

                                    Manufacturing process of carbon arrow shaft
For the most carbon arrow shafts for sale in the market, Whatever you get them from your distributors or pro shops..,Are You curious at “how carbon arrow shaft are manufactured” ? Perhabs you get some information from the big arrow company,like Carbon Express or Easton or other companys that they revealed a little information on their arrows shaft production process..But until now,i not find any very actual/detailed information of how the carbon shaft are made from carbon fiber.So i write this article since i have beening working in the arrow shaft manufacturing factory more than 3 years.
Currently, the carbon fiber market is monopolized by Japan,USA,KOERA,GERMANY, Far as i know,most of quality arrow use Mitsubishi, Toray,Or American brand fiber ,,Some budget arrow made of Chinese domestic carbon fiber (Include Taiwan carbon fiber ) . To some extents, the arrow quality is most decided by the material —-”Carbon Fiber Prepreg” . We Use Mitsusbishi carbon fiber.
Mitsubishi ,Toray carbon fiber shaft spine tolerance ,weight tolerance,straightness tolerance , and strength, durablity will be better than other fiber, As i not used the USA or Koera fiber , So i dnot have a judgement. It will also save the time in manufacturing  arrow shafts with good carbon fiber.A qualified arrow with tuned bow is not dangerous , Also archery is a good sport ! So dnot let the fear of archery to stop you to love this game. !
Here are detailed 11 steps of Building a carbon shaft :
1, Choosing the corresponding fiber type according to the arrow sepecfication(Like ID of shaft, spine,weight,strength),Precisely Cutting the fiber mat to the small carbon fiber sheet..Now we use the Auto cutting machine to get precise size small sheet.
.carbon fiber mat need to be cutted
2,We get the appropriate small fiber sheet,The technican will configurate/lay the small sheets in 0 or 90 degree (surely maybe some other degree for special shafts) .
3, The sheets need be rolled over the iron core(mandrel)by handwork and Auto machine (i think it can be called mandrel).
rolled carbon fiber around the mandrel
4, Twinng the applying tape around the rolled fiber mandrel to enable a clean form to be fabricated .
rolled mandrel
5, Thermal treatment , Send the rolled mandrel to the industrial drying oven to harden the carbon fiber inside structure and resin .
6,After thermal treatment, We need separate the applying tape from the rolled fiber shaft and clean the surface.
7,Ok,Then we get raw shaft now, Using the abrasive cutting off machine to cut shafts into 32” or other length.
8,Grinding the carbon shaft by the centreless grinding machine to get the shaft smooth surface and right spine and weight. Surely you need seasoned worker to adjust the machine and operate….
9,After all the above steps,,The shafts almost finished,,,Now we need measure the spine,straightness,weight tolerance,strength..Then classify different groups of shafts,Straightness 0.001”,0.003”,0.006”..Weight tolerance +/-1 or 2 grs, Spine tolerance +/-15 or +/-10..
10,Print the logo on the shaft,,Using silk screen print, Heat transfer, or water marking printing. And matt, gloosy finshed is available under requirement
.heat transfer machine
11, Then assemble the insert,nocks and fletched the vanes…After all finished,,The QC will check again,, Then send to our customers..For the new sample shafts,We will test it before by shooting machine then send to our club archer,, If they say ok,,We will contine produing the shafts again .
图片1
Surely there are many small process/steps in manufacturing i not list. Above all based on my own experience and knowledge,If you learn some different methods to make carbon arrow shaft,Please share with me. Thanks
Michael
Email :arrow@sunchaseind.com Telephone: +86-18700949476
1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 31 Oct 2016

Navy Family Hunt in Oregon

Thought this is not an archery hunt, there is more to the story than that, in that we should remember family gatherings and safety. Frank Biggs

                     NO EASY DAY!

It’s Saturday, October 1st, 4:30 AM. We are drinking coffee, standing around the fire and making plans where we’re going to hunt. It is opening morning and this will be our best chance to take down a nice buck.
It’s the first time we have our two sons, Dave and Scott together for a hunt. They have both been Navy SEALs for many years so we haven’t had this kind of opportunity, and we are all excited to get out in the woods.
Bill, my husband, has been hunting in this area for almost fifty years, so he is our coordinator. (not to mention, camp boss)
The boys will go together on one quad (one they borrowed from their sister, with bright pink lettering) with a boat seat attached to the back for a passenger seat. Real SEAL TEAM equipment! I promised not to post pictures on Facebook.

Do I see a Pink lettered Quad?

Do I see a Pink lettered Quad?

Bill and I will go a different direction on our quad with the boat seat on the back for me, which I love because I sit high and can see deer better.
We left at daybreak and hunted until 10:30 when we met back at camp for a big breakfast and a new strategy.

The boys had actually found a spot that looked untouched and rather promising, so with full bellies and a renewed determination, when we headed back out for the afternoon hunt, they went back to that same spot, which they dubbed “Delmer Pass” ( inside story ) for another look,  and Bill and I went the opposite direction.
Bill and I have been riding in this terrain for twenty years on quads without incident. We have been up and down some really rough trails and enjoyed every ride. We have spotted many deer and elk on our rides. But, this ride was different! We crossed a rocky creek and headed up the mountain, when we came to a crossroads. Do we go on the narrow right, or the rocky gully on the left? We chose the gully…began our left turn and the next thing I remember was Bill asking me if I was alright. He had asked me many times, but because our quad had turned over and I was knocked out on the rocks I didn’t hear him. But as I came to I was aware of a really bad pain in my foot and my head was bleeding like crazy. I asked Bill to please get the quad off me. The poor guy was trying but he couldn’t get his legs to move for several minutes. We could smell and feel gas spilling on us so we struggled together to get free. Somehow we did it and my foot came free. Pain gone!

Bill, and old Navy man and father of the Seals, doing some Marlin Spiking (knots)!

Bill, and old Navy man and father of the Seals, doing some Marlin Spiking (knots)!

He got the first aid kit and cleaned up my bleeding head and wrapped it in gauze, and I struggled to my feet. Together we set the quad upright, and realized our rifles had flown off about ten feet away. Believe it or not, when we sighted them in later, they were still right on
Bill insisted we go into the nearest town hospital and have me checked out, which we did and four hours later we were back at camp with our two concerned sons. No breaks, no stitches……just a small concussion and cuts and bruises. Lesson learned; getting too old to ride on my boat seat and maybe cut back on some of those really rough trails! I love that boat seat, but it has to go……
We all enjoyed a big fire that night and had a wonderful time just being together.

Well we do not see any of the elusive Navy Seals in this picture...

Well we do not see any of the elusive Navy Seals in this picture…

The next morning, those two NAVY SEALs were up and out early on that pink lettered quad, determined to come back with a nice big buck…….it didn’t happen….not for any of us. And that afternoon the oldest son, Dave and I walked through the woods together for about three hours and only saw the bald headed type deer.
They told me in the SEALs they were taught to think like the enemy, so we should think like the deer.( I agreed to do that, which I’m sure they got quite a laugh over) problem being, who the heck knows how a deer thinks? Instincts, instincts!
Well, maybe it worked for them because the next morning our younger son, Scott shot a real nice 3 by 3 on a hillside to their left. They were using the “field of fire” technique. Dave being left handed would be responsible for whatever showed up on the right side, and Scott being right handed would cover the left. They both got him in their sites however because his horns were hidden among the tree branches and hard to make out and they wanted to be sure. He turned his head just right and Scott said “buck!” and sent a perfect shot right through the heart…  By the time we reached them Dave had it all gutted out and they had it tied on the quad.( always team work with them ) We headed back to camp for the pole hanging, dressing out and bagging and bragging ritual……followed by a celebratory straight shot!
They didn’t get a chance to double their score because they had to leave the next day. It was hard to see them go, because we never know when we’ll get a chance to hunt together again. (OK I admit I cried a little)  Best hunting trip of our lives, with memories to last a lifetime.

Help me they are dragging me up the embankment!

Help me they are dragging me up the embankment!

For the next two days Bill and I hunted hard……we still rode the quad most of the time but one day it was down to nineteen degrees at night and really cold in the morning so we took the truck. We drove out to an area to find a place to get out and hunt, but as we are driving along I yelled at Bill to stop because there was two four point bucks right off the road on my side. Our dream scenario! Except for the fact that if I get out and put a round in the chamber those bucks will be gone. So, Bill gets out and goes around the back of the truck, but the deer are in front. He never saw them before they both walked off. We lamented over our lost opportunity as we drove on down the road.
After about four turns I yelled at Bill to stop again……there they were looking right at us, on my side of the road still. I still didn’t think I could get out without scaring them off so I sat still while Bill got out and went around the front of the pickup, off the road and nailed one, while the other ran off. (never to be seen again)
If we needed a bigger hint that we are getting older we got it in spades with this big buck. His body was really large, and a handsome 4×3 rack.
He was lying down in a deep ravine and we knew we weren’t going to be able to pull him up without help so we marked our spot and drove back and got the quad. So, now we have a dead deer, the quad with the winch on it and the pickup to put the deer in. Sounds pretty simple, right?  NOT!  We had to tie the quad to the pickup to keep it from going over, and then there wasn’t enough cable to reach the deer, so we had to keep adding rope and pull, then add more and pull. It took two hours to get it to the road.
Then, Bill gutted it out and we were ready to throw it in the back of the pickup, which was a great idea only the buck was too heavy and we couldn’t get him in there. So, next obvious answer was tying him on the quad, but we couldn’t lift his body up on it. By now we are sweating and exhausted and I sat on the tailgate and came up with a scathing, brilliant idea. Get that buck tied to the front of the quad the best we can, put the ramps down and drive it up into the truck and dump him in. We agreed that was the answer, however, I didn’t plan on me being the one to drive the quad up the ramp but Bill had to hold the bucks body up off the ramp, so I couldn’t get out of it. I said “I’m scared, I’m scared” all the way up that ramp, but I did it. (it was actually kinda fun) If you’re wondering why we didn’t just quarter it out, the answer is simply that we didn’t even think about it until that evening. Oh well!
We got back to camp and thank God the hunters in the camp next to ours were there to help hang it. It took us four hours from kill to camp…… As they say in the TEAMS,

                  “The only easy day was yesterday.”

Fran L.

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 20 Oct 2016

Public lands belong to everyone in the U.S.

I am a true believer of Public Lands for all!

“Public lands belong to everyone in the U.S. Often, though, your public lands are surrounded by a fortress of private property, making them inaccessible. Sometimes you have to go to extremes to hunt your public land.”

You could be the person in this photo.  You have until October 2016 to get it done.

You could be the person in this photo. You have until October 2016 to get it done.

This is the first feature film ever done for onXmaps and features Randy Newberg (Renown Big Game Hunter) and Matthew Seidel (onXmaps Staff) hunting an area that Randy tends to go to every year. If you watch his show you will know the area in question.

LINKS BELOW

A great video to view today:
LANDLOCKED – Montana Elk Hunt

Until the end of October there is a giveaway:

The great October 2016 give away from onXmaps HUNT

Frank Biggs aka Bwana Bubba

 

 

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 16 Oct 2016

The B.L.M.’s Plans – Affects Hunters Too!

The BLM’s Plans – Affects Hunters Too!

By William E. Simpson
10/16/16 — The BLM intends to double the size of the current 66,000 acre Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument by securing an additional 64,000 acres of existing public and some private lands, including some O & C lands from OR and about 10,000 acres from California via executive order of President Obama. This will severely effect the traditional and customary uses of all these acquired lands, and will ultimately affect all recreational sports, especially hunting. Environmentalists at and around Southern Oregon University were apparently given special advanced notice of the meeting ahead of other stakeholders and opponents to the proposed expansion, and the environmentalists organized well in advance of the meeting, even telling their supporters to ‘wear blue at the meeting’ (seen in the photo at this article: ijpr.org/post/public-weighs-cascade-siskiyou-monument-expansion) . They are now using the flawed science regarding ‘climate change’ to help justify what amounts to just another public land grab by the BLM.

========================================================
An Open Letter

TO: Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley
Oregon Senator Ron Wyden
Oregon and California Hunters
All Concerned Stakeholders

SUBJECT: The Proposed Expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou Monument (Soda Mountain Wilderness).

First of all, by way of a brief introduction; I grew-up in the Applegate Valley of Southern Oregon (circa 1960’s), not far from the Monument and the expansion lands in question. I graduated from Grants Pass High School and attended Oregon State University in Corvallis, OR. My father is buried in the Applegate Cemetery (OR) and my mother is buried in Gazelle, CA (Siskiyou County). I have fished, hunted and logged in and all around the existing Monument lands for decades. Today, our family owns land near and bordering the Monument and the proposed expansion lands, so I am a legitimate stakeholder.
As we have seen time and time again in the news, what Government agencies like the BLM tell the public is sometimes very far from the truth… and the BLM has seemingly earned a reputation for corruption and misrepresentation as shown by any quick Google search.
Here is just a small sampling from such a Google search:
justice.gov/usao-mt/pr/jury-convicts-former-high-ranking-blm-officialindianz.com/News/2015/018111.aspbillingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/ex-blm-officials-indicted-in-elaborate-fraud-scheme/article_d7c75cd2-9070-5ee5-be61-cb1a45747628.htmldailycaller.com/2016/06/04/this-federal-agency-had-a-tough-week/

havredailynews.com/story/2015/07/30/local/denny-blm-supervisor-sentenced-for-fraud/504995.html

usobserver.com/archive/jan-11/blm-abuse-criminal-conviction.html

And it goes as high as the top of the Dept. of Interior:
huffingtonpost.com/wayne-pacelle/inspector-general-report_b_8393670.html?fb_comment_id=468560149935946_468588926599735

For instance, the BLM talks about ‘doing right’ for wild burros and horses on page-3 of the Internal BLM Memo linked herein below, yet, as we have read in the link just above, the BLM is guilty of rounding them up and killing them every way possible. The BLM Memo:naturalresources.house.gov/uploadedfiles/doimonumentdesignationdocs_revised062910.pdf

Another current example of BLM malfeasance was discovered by KLAS News through their FOIA request of the Elko NV BLM office, which KLAS contends proves the BLM intended from the get-go to cheat Madeline Pickens on her $28-million dollar effort (which they encouraged her to do) to save thousands of wild horses from the BLM storage pens and slaughter, and in the end, the BLM is now trying to steal her water and grazing rights, as ‘a compromise’.

Learn more about that BLM con-job here: lasvegasnow.com/news/i-team-madeleine-pickens-losing-battle-with-the-blm

The internal BLM document linked below details the BLM’s claimed designs on public lands to be targeted by what I call ‘Monumentalism‘… which I venture a majority of Americans would consider an abuse of the Antiquities Act of 1906, where the original pure spirit and intention of the Act was to protect prehistoric Indian ruins and artifacts. However that Act has metastasized into an environmentalist’s tool for the allocation of land that would be reasonably and logically well beyond their reach or control. But as many of us know by following the money, that is merely part of the sales pitch and political activism used to fuel the acquisitions of lands well suited to the ultimate goal of mineral, gas and oil leases.

We’re broke as a Country, and looking at $20-trillion dollars in debt today. President Obama once called the addition of $4-trillion to the national debt by President Bush to create an aggregated total of $9-trillion dollars “un-patriotic and irresponsible” in a speech (here: youtube.com/watch?v=1kuTG19Cu_Q), then he turns around and spends another $16-trillion by himself! Americans everywhere are sick to death of this immorality and political corruption as we clearly see today. Integrity seems to be low on agenda.

Yet, look at the money the BLM is willing to spend to take lands out of the control of average Americans by proposed spending of nearly $2.4-billion dollars! (budget on the last pages, of course; page-21) naturalresources.house.gov/uploadedfiles/doimonumentdesignationdocs_revised062910.pdf

And Siskiyou County is currently running on fumes financially because of government over-regulation and loss of lands, and related jobs. Yet even knowing this, these Federal agencies are happy to take even more land off our tax roles, and then replace property tax revenues with Federal money that has all-kinds of strings attached… making us into children who don’t get their allowances unless we do as we’re told. This is what is unpatriotic. The chair-lady of the Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors, Grace Bennett, was given last minute notice of the meeting and had little time to prepare-for this meeting in Ashland, OR and then, even worse, she was allowed only 3-minutes to address this enormous issue. All the while, the environmentalists who filled half the room ‘dressed in blue’, who arguably ‘staged’ this meeting at Southern Oregon University, had two large screens positioned on both sides of the meeting hall, each displaying only their ‘pro-expansion’ talking points! The entire ‘public input meeting’ was totally rigged.

Hawaii is also being conned by the BLM and their administrators who are obviously working for special interests and big-corp. giants interested in the undersea manganese deposits around Hawaii.
I lived there for a decade and taught at the University of Hawaii Maui Campus and ran a combination of charter and commercial fishing, diving and research boats that helped scientists there restore the reefs through a program of best-practices in anchoring and mooring systems on the heavily used ‘tourist reefs’.

The agenda for the expansion of the Monument there in Hawaii has nothing to do with pelagic fish preservation as they allege… same SOP … people hear about meetings at the last second, meeting is preceded by mainstream media covering the BLM talking points, opponents are provided with 3-minutes or less to opine on a complex issue, audience testimony is stacked with proponents selected by the BLM to speak, meetings are located as far away from genuine stakeholders as possible…. and during times and days where working-class people cannot attend, especially with the short notices provided by the agency.

youtube.com/watch?v=pTMIjFVkgiE

A vicious self perpetuating cycle of gobbling-up public lands and then exploiting them (*revenues from the lease royalties derived from the lands), and then using the licensing royalties to buy even more lands!

Then we have the Medford BLM with the audacity to tell the public in meetings, like a recent meeting in Ashland that a significant portion of the access roads to/in the Soda Mountain Wilderness ‘Monument’ have to be closed-down because the BLM cannot afford to maintain them, thus limiting, and in many cases, eliminating public access to lands that were allegedly set aside for the multiple-use enjoyment and use of the People (hunting, etc.)… bait and switch at the highest levels of government and its agencies run-amok.

And as a result of road closures (“no money for road maintenance” says the BLM) in the Cascade-Siskiyou Monument (Soda Mountain Wilderness) hunters are no longer able to access the more remote and productive hunting grounds in the Soda Mountain Wilderness (Monument), where vehicles are needed by handicapped and infirm or older hunters, who are subsequently forced to use (trespassing & hunting on) more accessible privately-owned lands, creating conflicts with private land owners, which I have seen as a growing trend in Siskiyou County from my on-site observations.

This is just outrageous and intolerable multiple levels, and it’s a sham that any politician would allow this to occur. Something must be done! This is the kind of problem that will eventually circle around and bite everyone in the backside.

Given the malfeasance and shenanigans that surrounded the so-called ‘public input meeting’ in Ashland on Oct. 14th, I strongly urge both Senators Merkley and Wyden to consider having a more balanced and honest public input meeting in Siskiyou County, with adequate notice provided to our County Officials, since approximately 10,000 acres in our County seem to be under the BLM’s gun as well, including the Horseshoe Ranch Wildlife Area, a local hunter’s and recreational paradise.

I also urge all readers of this open letter to immediately contact both Senators who are collecting input on this Monument expansion; Senator Jeff Merkley via his office by phone and by email/mail ASAP:

Senator Jeff Merkley (OR)
121 SW Salmon Street., Ste. 1400
Portland, OR 97204
Phone: (503) 326-3386
Fax: (503) 326-2900

And, Senator Ron Wyden
wyden.senate.gov/contact

MORE INFO ABOUT THE PROPOSED MONUMENT EXPANSION HERE:
healthyforests.org/action_center?vvsrc=%2fcampaigns%2f48159%2frespond

*
A number of federal laws establish requirements for oil and gas leasing and development on federal and even tribal lands. These include the (1) Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 (30 USC 181 et seq.), which established the authority of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) to oversee oil and gas operations on federal land; (2) Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 (30 USC 351 et seq.), which extended the DOI authority over oil and gas operations to federal “acquired lands;” (3) Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 (30 USC 21 et seq.), which established modern policy regarding mineral development in the United States of encouraging private enterprise while mitigating adverse environmental impacts; (4) Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 USC 1701 et seq.), which defined the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) responsibilities with respect to oil and gas development; (5) Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 (25 USC 396a-g), which provides for leasing of minerals on tribal lands; and (6) Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (25 USC 2102 et seq.), which provides for tribes to enter into energy development agreements with DOI approval.

William Simpson is the author of Dark Stallions – Legend of the Centaurians, proceeds from which go towards supporting wild and domestic horse rescue and sanctuary.
 
Capt. William E. Simpson II is a U.S. Merchant Marine Officer with decades of boating and expedition sailing experience, having logged more than 150,000 miles at sea. Simpson has successfully survived long-term ‘off the grid’ at sea and at remote uninhabited desert islands with his family for years at a time. He holds a U.S.C.G. 500-ton captain’s license for commercial-inspected passenger vessels and he is also a commercial airplane and helicopter pilot.
Simpson spent his formative years growing up on the family’s working ranch in the mountains of Southern Oregon, where horses were an integral part of the daily life. William left the family ranch to attend college, which turned out to be a stepping stone into a bizarre lifestyle that led him around the world on an entrepreneurial quest. An adventurer at heart, Simpson and his best friend and wife Laura, spent many years at sea during two sailing expeditions (1991-1994 and 2008-2011) where they experienced some of the many wonders and mysteries of nature. Since retiring, Bill and Laura have changed lifestyles and are once again engaged in a new adventure; living an off-grid lifestyle in the remote wilderness of the Siskiyou Mountains, where they enjoy coexisting with herds of wild horses, along with a myriad of other wild animals. The staggering beauty of the local mountains and valleys is awe inspiring and has influenced Bill to frequently write on subjects related to wild horses as well as wild and domestic horse advocacy, rescue and sanctuary.

Capt. William E. Simpson II – USMM Ret.

Member:  Authors Guild
IMDb

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 14 Oct 2016

Bwana Bubba’s Thoughts – Landlocked Public Lands

Landlocked Public Land – A Good Trade or Bad Trade?

When plans of a great hunt goes bad after doing your in depth homework on a hunting unit and finding it is too much work to make it fun and give up.  The great State of Oregon, as well as other western states in CONUS has a great amount of public land, whether it is National Forest, State Lands, and Bureau of Land Management lands.  Those that spend a great deal of their off time in the field hunting, fishing, hiking or whatever else takes them in to the field have found that there is a great deal landlocked public land that is very difficult to access.

In my younger days, with my hunting partners we challenged the access every year.  Having worked with paper maps in my early stages of my hunting life, too figure out how to get into the public lands was very time consuming.  Early on we would find the touching points and jump the line, though Wyoming was the first to make that illegal to do so.  Unless the government changes the use of satellites’, I will trust the modern day GPS or mobile device and my mapping software 100% as many paper maps and some mapping software are not accurate with all the changes going on.  How many still have 20+ year old National Forest maps and Rams maps?   Funny I just threw way in my recycle container all of my paper maps from the last 40 years…  That included the map of a certain hunt unit in Oregon that had more than 200 elk harvest from the circle of acquaintances’ over the years.

The other day after posting an old article about a land trade that was in the making back some years ago, I took some heavy hits from a rancher.  I understand where he was coming from and his comments were well said.  My feeling still did not wavier on the subject of that particular B.L.M. and private land trade, to free up B.L.M. that was encompassed with the private lands.  Reading the government/private land proposal, I personally and others that opposed it, knew that much of the public land would still only be used few and the private sector would still get the better deal.  The majority felt the only road into the new setup would be control by the private sector…  That would have been by a very big organization and not the ranchers.

This BLM which you can access, could have been lost to the public...

This BLM which you can access, could have been lost to the public…

As I am writing this article, I venture up in the hills outside of Molalla, Oregon looking for Blacktails to do a photo op.  I wanted to work around some old haunts in the upper area; low and behold I find that some of the BLM has been swapped out to a private timber company.  Weyerhaeuser property touches some of the property and the companies warning signs were in full view.  One has to love the BLM No Shooting Signs on posted on the BLM, and no residential structures in the area.  I feel it is an attempt to keep hunters from even going on the BLM, since there is private and timber company properties close by.

If the public (outdoor enthusiast) would look at computer or mobile device with mapping software such as the best being onXmaps HUNT , you’re going to be very surprise to see how much public land that is tied up and almost impossible to have access to.   The ranchers, farmers, and landowners have the access and it basically like an extension to their own land.  With money one can find a way in, such as being dropped in by a helicopter, parachute or even an ultralight…  You have to weigh the cost and still know you’re going to have to come back out the public landlocked land, without setting foot on private.

In this paragraph I am attaching number pictures of BLM land that the private land makes it basically landlocked.  There is a BLM Right-Away, yet the public can’t use it.  The land has caretakers or ranch hands that besides using it for their personnel use, act as if they own it, since the owner is not living on the property.   There are always two sides to the story of course, giving access to the public on the Right-Away and the public take advantage of it using the private land as well as the public land.  I do know that opposite side of the river in this attached map, the Right-Away is open for about 4 miles.  For the most part the public does adhere to the only using the public land.

The BLM Rd. on the east side is closed and locked. River crossing or 11 mile walk...

The BLM Rd. on the east side is closed and locked. River crossing or 11 mile walk…

BLM Rd. is accessible to the road closure, which is about 4 miles.

BLM Rd. is accessible to the road closure, which is about 4 miles.

There was a major poaching problem as far as I am concerned in 2016 prior to the opening hunt for Oregon with local Natives being able to have access year round to hunt when it necessary to do so based on treaties, even if they are trespassing.  It would not have been so bad if they had not cut the heads off and only took the backstraps only on the elk and deer they took on private land.  In this case the Right-Away is problem since they can drive and kill on both the public and private lands…   We have to remember that the land owners are not landlocked.  They can have easements with the B.L.M., in many cases they have the lease on public land.

Some of the greatest Mule Deer and Rocky Mtn. Elk hunting area...

Some of the greatest Mule Deer and Rocky Mtn. Elk hunting area…

Many years ago I had open access to a parcel of land in eastern Oregon, what a great deal it was for archery deer and elk hunting.   Most of the time in the gang, there were 4 of us.  In those days working in the sporting goods business, to buy a 4 way rifle which was an inexpensive way to give a gratuity to a rancher.   Many years later after the rancher sold-out, I went into the back country with my Garmin GPS and onXmaps HUNT software loaded on the GPS, low and behold much of the land that we travel through his fences to get to where all Federal lands (BLM/NF).    To access this land all one had to do was travel on another access point on federal lands.

If I was a private land owner; I would want all my lands in one parcel overall, as long as it has a good water source.  Saying this there are the ranchers that have the summer range and the winter range and that is important to them, and rightly so. The public should never lose access to public land in any state, and we (public) should never give up or lose the river or water rights to private, unless private land is already deeded with their water source and have the land to the navigational line in the sand so to speak.  The B.L.M., should never be allowed to take away land and the ranchers lose their water, a necessary commodity of life to a ranch.  The trades need to be even as they can, so both the public and the private benefit from the trade.

 

 

 

Bwana Bubba…

 

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by sportsmanoutfitters on 05 Jul 2016

Barnett Crossbows Review

Today we wanted to review and shed light on Barnett Crossbows, one of the brands of high end bows on the market. This below delivers a 410+ FPS shooting speed with superb accuracy at 70 or more yards. Very lightweight and easy to handle with short axle to axle length with enough power to drop any large game. Normally a scope is included but I normally recommend any Vortex Scopes. They are good high end scopes with middle of the run prices. The ultra-light carbon risers give the bow a good well-balanced feel and touch.

The Barnett line of bows are known for a fast release and packs a good punch.

Releases fast and hits hard exactly where you are directing it to go. For a rugged and lightweight bow I recommend one of the high-end bows from Barnett. If you can afford it, buy it!

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by sportsmanoutfitters on 05 Jul 2016

Vortex Scope Review

Being that Vortex Scopes have come into the mainstream I wanted to give a good review on the products. While fairly new to the market they are built very solid with just the right amount of resistance in the turrets with solid “clicks.” They have the absolute best eye relief and the all purpose reticle is very fast yet precise when you need it.

The scope has a very smooth finish to it…almost perfect. It also feels considerably light in comparison to the competition. They are super bright and clear all the way up to 20x. However, when you do adjust the parrallax ignore the sharpness on your target. Adjust the reticle movement and then use the eye piece to focus. It took me about 20 seconds to get this perfect at 100yds.

Overall I think Vortex is doing a superb job and they are here to stay!

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by sportsmanoutfitters on 05 Jul 2016

Primos Game Cam Review

I recently purchased the Primos The Truth 46 Game Cam. I was very impressed with the quality of the images of my new game camera after having used Covert Cameras for the last few years. Honestly, the pictures that this game camera produces is better than some digital trail cameras. The Primos Game Cameras produce a 55 Foot night time range and nice crisp 7mp photos. There are several options you can choose from such as the delay of pics, 3, 5 or 7 megapixels and photo/video options plus more.
The cam also features new anti blur technology in which I can attest to. Out of the thousands of pictures this game camera has produced I haven’t had one blurry photo. So, if you are looking for a new game camera this upcoming season I highly recommend Primos The Truth 46 Game Camera.

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by sportsmanoutfitters on 05 Jul 2016

Burris Fullfield II Riflescope Review

I recently purchased the Burris Fullfield II 6.5-20×50 Riflescope online from Sportsman Outfitters. I was pretty skeptical before buying which is why I did my homework on different riflescopes such as Meopta Optics, Nikon Sport Optics and Leupold Scopes. Well, after thorough research and questioning I decided that the Burris Fullfield II was the rifle scope for me. So, I found the best price on riflescopes online at Sportsman Outfitters. They were very friendly and made the transaction very easy. I received the riflescope about 2 days later. After mounting the scope to my new rifle I went to the shooting range to test the new Burris Scopes.

Well, I figured being I didn’t pay top dollar for a riflescope that I was getting lower cost quality. I did pay about $399 for the riflescope which is pretty middle of the range. When I first took a peek through the Burris Fullfield II Riflescope I was shocked at the brightness and clearness. I really didn’t expect what I had just saw. After sighting my scope in at about 300 yards I took a break and just throught about the deal I had just made. This Burris scope was very easy to sight in as well I must say. I must say if you are purchasing a Burris Fullfield you will get the most bang for your buck. Only a few stores online have them decently priced. But I didn’t really have to look far when I found them at Sportsman Outfitters. I had purchased a few things from them before so I felt comfortable. All in all I would definitely recommend the Burris Fullfield II 6.5-20x50mm Riflescope to anyone looking for a high end riflescope but looking to make a good deal.

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...Loading...

Published by sportsmanoutfitters on 05 Jul 2016

High End Coolers Reviews and Ranks

We at Sportsman Gear Reviews did a comprehensive test on the top high end premium coolers in the market that we have personally used and owned for years. We are here to show consumers the good, bad and ugly truth.
SPECS –  Lifetime warranty, made in the U.S.A.
PROS – It rated the best in our ice-retention test, and it has the best warranty in the business. So if yours ever breaks, they’ll send you a new one.
CONS – We feel that the Pelican Coolers rated low on weight and heaviness but which is why it rates higher in ice retention.
BOTTOM LINE – If you are looking for a cooler that will hold ice the longest and it is staying in your boat or at the camp for any extended period of time. This is your cooler. If you plan on moving the cooler around a lot you might want to look elsewhere because this is the most rugged and heaviest cooler out there.
SPECS –  5 Year Warranty and made in the U.S.A.
PROS – It rated second best in our ice retention tests. This cooler that is made in the US has a lot of bells and whistles. It features both rope and solid handles, good drain plugs, rubber bottom so the cooler won’t slip in the boat and a ruler to measure your catch. The price runs middle of the market which means you can get a good US made solid cooler for a decent price.
CONS – The handles are different than any of the other premium coolers so it could be difficult to learn to use. The good part is that the latches are very easy to open and doesn’t take a lot of strength like a lot of the competition.
BOTTOM LINE – If you are looking for a cooler that will hold ice for a good amount of time and is light enough to move around and is American made this is your cooler.
SPECS – Lifetime warranty and made in the U.S.A
PROS – Good ergonomic design that is very unique. It features good latches and handles. The warranty is lifetime which can’t be beat. Features ruler on the top of the cooler for measuring fish.
CONS – Ice retention for the Grizzly Coolers has always been on the lower end. It is priced on the higher end as well. However, you can find online retailers that give good discounts which make it more affordable.
BOTTOM LINE – These coolers have cool sleek and ergonomic designs with some bells and whistles. Ice retention could be the deciding factor here but with its lightweight design and lifetime warranty it could very well be worth it.
SPECS – 4 Year Warranty & Made Overseas
PROS –  The Arizona based company had a good strategy when they came to market. They put out a cooler with an excellent price point and is very lightweight and easy to maneuver. For sportsman constantly on the go this could be a huge plus.
CONS – Thin walls and ice retention rates on the low end for these coolers. All lso, the handles and latches aren’t very rugged. The good news is that Canyon will replace these under their lifetime warranty. You will need this because  these can easily break.
BOTTOM LINE – If you are in the market for your first premium cooler this could be your low cost entry level cooler. While it serves it’s purpose there are some minor shortcuts to this cooler.
SPECS – 5-year warranty and made overseas
Unlike its sister cooler, the Frostbite R, the Icey-Tek Long Box has a way to go before it’s competitive in this crowd.
PROS – Priced low in the market while having relatively solid ice retention. You could find a good deal with online retailers which will drop the price even more.
CONS – Bottom of the pack in ice retention and ruggedness of the roto mold. The plastic is on the lower end and shows cracks when dropped.
BOTTOM LINE – If you are looking for an entry level premium cooler that won’t hurt your pocket book this could be the cooler for you. If you will just use it a 6-7 times throughout the year this could be the investment for you.
SPECS – 5 Year Warranty & Made in the USA
PROS – Good ergonomic design and thick walled cooler. Nice rugged latches and hinges. Owner has a lot of experience manufacturing and designing coolers.
CONS – Taiga is very new in the market so it remains to be seen if they could gain traction in the market. Long term wear on these coolers are unknown since they are new.
BOTTOM LINE – If you are looking for a solid color with ergonomic design this could be your cooler especially if you are in to trying new items in the market. We don’t think this would be a high risk or bad buy for you.
To conclude we hope that you found our reviews helpful. We did not review Yeti for a reason. As a consumer please do not fall into this marketing trap. There are far better coolers out there especially for the price. Thank you!

 

Bad Behavior has blocked 931 access attempts in the last 7 days.