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Published by mafriend03 on 25 Mar 2008

Bowhunting Turkey Success Tips!

Bowhunting turkeys can be a challenge in itself, however if you take your time and do things right you should have a set of spurs and a beard on your wall quicker than you think, here’s how!

Do your homework! Typically a week or so before season begins I go out and mow down about an acre of tall grass and weeds, this seems to bring the turkeys in better than anything else. When I have knowledge of turkeys in my area I’ll go and wait about an hour or so before dark outside my truck and attempt to get turkeys to gobble at the sound of my owl call using the cadence “who cooks for you, who cooks for you all”. This will let you know where to set up the turkeys the next day.

Set up on em’ When hunting turkeys with a bow my set up of choice is out of a ground blind such as a double bull Matrix 360 to give me the optimal field of view. With the rapid success of strutting jake/tom decoys on the market I told myself I will never enter the woods again without one after my first attempt to hunt with one! Set up a hen decoy only 5-10 feet out side your blind directly facing your set up followed by a strutting tom decoy (a real tail fan adds realism) only about 10-15 feet away from your set up on a 45 degree angle facing your set up.This set up will ensure you that either a tom will come in to breed with the hen, or face the strutting tom decoy face on to fight.

Calling is overused and overrated! Most guys will go out and call and call and call just to feel macho that they can get a Tom to gobble… Put your ego aside if you really want to bag a long beard. While the Tom is still oh his roost (from the previous night you should know where this is) give him just a few SOFT yelps and purrs, nothing more because you don’t want to throw your whole bag of tricks at him all at once. Just let that Tom know there is another Hen in the area. Yelp approximately 4-6 times SOFTLY depending on how vocal the gobbler is. Once the Tom pitches from his roost give him a few (2-4) more yelps this time let him know your serious with a higher pitch. If the gobbler sounds like he is without a hen there should be no need to give him anymore than 2-10 yelp sequences in order to make that gobbler commit. If your gobbler is hened up (with a hen) you might need to do a bit of cutting on your call, this will excite not only the Tom but more importantly the Hen! Wherever the Hen goes you can expect the long beard to follow. Once the Tom spots your decoy set up, be prepared with your bow in hand and your release clipped on! It would be a huge benefit if you mastered a few calls on your diaphragm (mouth) call because once that gobbler comes running in to fight you may not get a chance to reach down and pick up your favorite call without being spotted.

Tips Wear black in the ground blind, remember the closest part of your body to the turkeys will be your hands, so cover them up! Put your fancy wrapped arrows away, again try to make your arrows as dark as you can (fletching also). Lower your bow poundage if you can, its better to have your arrow stuck in the bird rather than blowing right through it. “Hit em’ high, watch em’ die, hit em’ low, watch em’ go” is the old saying when shooting at turkeys with a bow. Try a large expandable broadhead, or even a broadhead designed to hit the bird in the head/neck if your confident in your shooting.

 

Best of luck!

M.Friend

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Published by Pabowhunter29 on 25 Mar 2008

The Best Broadheads for you

Whats the Best Broadhead for you? It all depends on what your hunting, what pound your shooting, and you over ability to tune a bow. If your your hunting big game like moose or elk, i would shoot a cut-on-contact head like the Magnus Stingers. But if your hunting deer, mostly every bow today has enough KE ( kinetic energy) to shoot any broadhead with the power for a pass-thru. If your bowhunting the Wild Turkey, i would shoot a Big mechanical head. But if your not   shoot a med. to high weight or your draw length is short, your best bet would be a cut-on-contact. But the best broadhead for you is the one your most comfortable with.

                                                                       Pa

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Published by Pabowhunter29 on 25 Mar 2008

5 ways to use Bow wax

1. Of course number one will be to wax your string and cables.

2. Put it on the threads of your field tips. ( so you dont have to keep checking to see if there loose and so your field tips won’t come out in your targets)

3. Put it on the threads of your Broadheads. How many times did you nock an arrow, only to hear your broadhead rattle because it was loose? This will happen no more, with the wax your broadhead will not back out.

4. Put it on the threads of any screw, so they dont back out. How many times did have your sight dead on and a week later, when the screw loose? Just put a little wax on the treads, then sight it in and your good to go.

5. Last but not least, i but a little on my rangefinder. How many times have you had to quickly check your distance, when that trophy of a life time is coming in, you dont want to drop it. If you but a little wax on your rangefinder, it will make it tacky. This way you have a better grip on it.

  I hope you take these tips to heart and try them this fall.

                                                    Pa

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Published by jgregoire687 on 21 Mar 2008

Building a Hunting Blind

Hello there.  This is a first time at writing a blog.  So bear with me and I will do what I can to make this interesting and informative. 

 I have recently begun building (1st time) a ground blind to hunt from.  I am about 30% of the way into the project.  The project will be as simple as possible with limited tools needed.  No fancy cuts or tools will be needed.  I am still in the midst of winter, despite the calendar claims of SPRING.  Given that our weather is still in flux I am building the blind in my garage.  I will temporarily screw the framed portions together, disassemble, load in the truck, and reassemble on site.  The blind will be painted camoflage to hide from the anti’s and tresspassers.  This will be placed on the site of my food plot from last year.  

 

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