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Published by archerchick on 08 Feb 2011

Fine Tuning The Compound ~ By Roy Hoff


Bow And Arrow
August 1975

Fine Tuning The Compound ~ By Roy Hoff
At First Glance, One May Feel Only A Graduate Engineer Stands A Chance, But Here’s The Step-By-Step Technique!

DURING RECENT MONTHS, BOW & ARROW has received many
requests on how to tune a compound bow. Upon receiving this writing
assignment, a thought occurred to me that often is expressed in race horse
parlance: “If you want to know if a certain horse is going to win a race, go
to the horse and get the dope straight from the horse`s mouth.”

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This is exactly what I did! Only, the horse was Jennings Compound Bow, Incorporated.
If the owners, Tom Jennings and John Williamson, do not know how to tune a
compound bow, then there just is no way! As we seated ourselves in comfortable
chairs in Tom’s immaculate office of their new manufacturing plant in
Castaic, California, I recalled an embarrassing incident I experienced during our
Alaskan hunt.

We were warming up prior to taking to the hills. I shot a practice arrow and my
bowquiver shed a sharp broadhead that, in its fall to the ground, severed my
bowstring. This was years ago, when I was shooting a conventional bow. At
that time it was hardly worth mentioning. I had a spare string in my pocket, which
put me back in business in a minute or two.

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Suppose this had happened to my compound bow. How would I or you ~ have
been able to replace the string and fine-tune the bow back into the condition it
was when received from the manufacturer? Following are the answers, as told
to me by the aforementioned partners of Jennings Compound Bow, Incorporated.

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Step No. l: Loosen jam nuts on weight bolts. Most archers keep jam
nut only finger tight so it may be loosened in the field without a
wrench. Apply counterclockwise force on the nut with fingers of left hand
and simultaneously turn the weight adjustment bolt — using allen wrench
supplied with your bow — counter- clockwise and jam nut will loosen. Do
not, at this point, loosen or turn tuning keys.

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Step No. 2: Before you go hunting or attend a tournament, you should
mark the limbs along the side plates at your favorite draw weight. This is in
case you lose count of the end-bolt turns, or the end bolts come all the
way out, Loosen end bolts approximately eight turns — will vary some
depending on the draw weight of your bow by turning end bolts counter-
clockwise. Cables and string should be loose, but not out of the tracks in the
end wheels.

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Step No. 3: Lay the bow on its side with string facing you and sight
window up. Turn right eccentric end wheel clockwise until it snugs the
cables, then drop your allen wrench in the lighting hole in the wheel that is
closest to the back side of the limb. Turn left eccentric counterclockwise
and drop a pen, pencil, small stick, nail, etc., in the lighting hole nearest
the back of the limb. This will keep the eccentric wheels from turning and
letting the cables tangle on the tuning keys or come off the idlers. The string
should be loose at this point and come unhooked easily. Unhook the string,
noting double—loop hookup on S hook. Replace new string in the same manner
on the S hooks.

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Step 4: Remove allen wrench and other pin from the eccentrics. Make
sure cables are in the tracks. Take up end-adjustment bolts approximately
half the number of turns you let off. Examine end wheels to make sure
cables are in the tracks. Examine cables at the idler wheels. Examine
cable at the tuning keys to make sure the cable is not crossed. Cable must be
laying even and not overlapping at any place on the tuning key. Cables should
be easy to move into correct position; however, if they are too tight, loosen
end bolts enough to take off tension. When cables are right, take up end
bolts to line on limb or the correct number of turns.

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Step No. 5: Replace nocking point, kisser button, peep sight, etc. A bow
square is necessary for this job if you want to do it right. Hunters should
have a prepared string, complete with nocking point, with them in the field
at all times.

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How To Change A Cable

Step No. l: Lay bow down with sight window up and string facing you.
Measure tiller height. Measure both.

Step No 2: Loosen lock screws in tuning key of cable to be changed. Turn Grover-type
key counterclockwise to loosen and cap screw—type of key clockwise to loosen. Loosen
key until all wraps are off the reel.

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Step No. 3: Grasp cable one-half-inch from hole in reel and push cable
into hole and keep pushing until stop swage comes out the end of the reel.
At times. it is necessary to probe with a thin instrument ice pick, scribe,
etc. — into end of the reel to dislodge stop swage. Snip stop swage off cable
with sharp cutting pliers. Pull cable out of reel. Unthread cable off idler
and out through the slot in the limb. Turn eccentric wheel until set screw in
center of the wheel is opposite end of limb. Remove this set screw completely.
Use small, round pad to protect cable from being cut by set screw.
Save this pad.

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Step No. 4: Unhook string from S hook. Remove cable from eccentric.
You might have to out—shrink tubing from cable to pass through hole in
eccentric. Your replacement cable will come with S hook installed, new
shrink tube and new stop swage. Drive a finishing nail into a board. Hook the
old cable and the new cable on the nail by the S hooks. Make ninety-degree
bend in the new cable exactly the same as the old one. The factory does
not pre—bend the cables, because this varies with the size of wheel, draw
length, etc., of your bow. Feed new cable into eccentric wheel in the same
direction you removed the broken cable. Replace round pad in set screw
hole. Screw set screw in until it makes contact with cable. Make one—quarter
turn more.

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Step No. 5: Slip on shrink tube and feed cable back through idler in the
same direction as you removed broken cable and into the hole in the reel of
the tuning key. Pull cable out of end of reel and pull until eccentric stops
turning. Measure four inches from the end of the reel and cut cable with
sharp cutting pliers. Slip on copper stop swage and swage with tool
supplied. Pull swage back into reel as far as it will go and bend cable slightly
to hold. Turn the Grover tuning key clockwise until you have two turns on
the reel. Cap screw tuning key counterclockwise. Re—hook string,
making sure cable with S hook. extending out of eccentric, is wrapped
around eccentric through slot in limb before you hook up string. Take up
several turns on end-bolt adjustment screws to take slack out of cables and
string. Note; If your limbs are not marked. be sure and keep track of
turns so you can return to your favorite draw weight.

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Step No. 6: Take up on new cable tuning key until eccentrics balance
with each other. Do this by observing the distance between the cable near
the S hook in relation to where the cable goes into the eccentric. Take up
only the tuning key where you re- placed the cable. Do not turn the
other key, as it should stay in original position for a single-cable change. Fine
tuning is done by feel. Shrink the shrink tube with a match, torch or any
other movable source of heat.

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Fine Tuning Your Tournament
Compound Bow

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l. Check the tiller heights. To re-fresh your memory, the lower-limb
tiller should be one-eighth—inch less than the upper.

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2. Test draw your bow to check roll—over of the eccentric cams. lf they
don’t roll together, adjust by means of the tuning keys mounted on the side
plates.

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3. Install a handle center—reference point. To do this, place a two—inch
piece of masking tape between the upper side plates on the inside of the
handle so you can see it when bow is held at arm’s length. Mark an accurate
center line between the two side plates that can be seen from five or six feet.
This will be used as a visual center reference.

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4. Install a squeeze-on nocking point, do this gently, as you might
be moving it later. Locate it five- eighths of an inch above ninety
degrees from the arrow rest. This set-up is for nocking point over the
arrow, one-fourth-inch Bjorn nocks and ledge-type release-aid Finger
shooters, using a leather tab, usually prefer to nock slightly lower by
approximately one-sixteenth of an inch. Nocking points, of course, are
personal and require slight adjustment by the individual archer.

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5. Clamp bow in vertical position ina padded vise. Nock arrow and place
on arrow rest.

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6. Adjust your cushion plunger or adjustable rest in or out until the bow-
string bisects the arrow from point to nock when the string is aligned with
the center line mark on the masking tape A pasted between the two upper
side plates. Stand back several feet to do this aligning. Double check nocking
point height and that your cushion plunger — if used — strikes center of
the arrow.

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7. Stand at shooting mark, approximately six feet from a unidirectional
backstop — excelsior bale is good — placed at shoulder height. Shoot with
your best technique. Should arrow enter nock right — right—hand shooter
— increase bow poundage. Left entry, decrease poundage. Work one pound
at a time — one-fourth turn. Re- member, both limbs exactly the same.
lf arrow enters nock high, lower nocking point. lf it enters nock low,
raise nocking point. Finger shooters may require a cushion plunger or
adjustable arrow rest set slightly out- side of center.

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8. When you have acquired good arrow entry at six feet, try several at
twenty to thirty feet. lf you get extreme deflection, either you are too
center-shot or you are striking your fletchings Adjust center-shot out just a
little. If you think you are striking the lower hen-feather fletch, rotate nock
on the arrow.

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9. The best hand position is a straight wrist with the back of the
hand flat, bow handle load carried on the base of the thumb — not the
thumb. The less thumb contact with the handle, the better. lf you shoot
with a low wrist, turn your hand so the knuckle line is diagonal to the
vertical line of your bow.

10. With a release-aid, you can shoot bow weight — holding weight — down
to fifteen pounds or less with good arrow flight. Some finger shooters find
it difficult to get good arrow flight under thirty pounds — holding weight.
Since you are always holding and releasing a lighter weight with a com-
pound bow, a good, relaxed release will have to be developed. The more
you shoot your compound the better your release will become. You will
learn to relax your fingers after the peak load, which occurs at mid—draw.

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Published by bowhuntr15 on 08 Feb 2011

Lucky the Tree

My Memory of Lucky the Tree:

My name is Alex and I’ve hunted for 11 years, being able to successfully fill my freezer and share blessings with church members and friends. Happy the 2008-09 season finally came around, I could not wait to hit the woods hard that first opening week hoping to finally harvest a wall hanger. Little did I know that this year was going to be an emotional roller coaster. My wife Alex (yes, we have the same name) and I had scouted hard during the off season and had spotted a great bachelor group and thought we had patterned them well. During one of our scouting trips, we looked for a good tree to prepare. While my wife was helping me prepare shooting lanes, she found a rack of a non-typical 20 yards from “our” tree. WHAT A MOMENT and what a sign of what was to come! We ended naming that tree “Lucky”.

On opening day, I was able to leave work early, pick my wife up, and try to beat the rush of hunters. Thank God we were there early, because there were some hunters that had not done their off season “homework” and looked like lost kids. We had to “shoo” them off and hoped they had not bumped all the deer to the next county. We finally settled in at about 12:30 p.m. and got our bows ready. At the base of Lucky, I set up our blind. When 5:00 hit, deer were moving. It looked like a hunting show. A few does came out first and were using the trail we’d seen. Then, 30 minutes later, a shooter (130 class) finally stepped out, and wouldn’t you know it, it stopped right at a lane we had not cleared well. A few vines covered his vitals. I maintained drawn for what seemed forever. Sweat was seeping like never before, and I could almost hear my pulse! My wife ranged him for me at 22 yards – 3 yards inside my strong comfort level. He finally spotted us, new something was not right, never took that one step and blew right out of there! My heart sank. I told my wife why I couldn’t shoot and quickly got out of the blind with my pruners, and snipped those vines.

15 minutes later, more deer started coming out. We were waiting for the right one. Well the right one finally came. A trophy. A spike buck finally walked the same steps the 130″ class did. Stopped exactly on the same spot. He was about to start walking, but I threw a short grunt, he looked our way. My beautiful wife released that arrow and made a perfect shot with the Rage!!! Her first deer. Her first buck. Her first experience and understanding of the “THE FEELING”.

Later that week I had several encounters off my stand on Lucky. It was on October 8th that I harvested a beautiful buck, too – the Rage. I’ve harvested more deer since then. My wife skipped the next year because of her pregnancy, and on Feb. 24, 2010, my son Marko was born!!!!

Hunting is a big part of my life, but only because of my wife’s support. We plan to teach our son about the outdoors, and that it’s not the size of the rack that’s most important, but moments like these – that mama and I shared that led to her first bow kill, down to how we “met” Lucky the Tree. The spike she shot, her first deer, is literally……, our millennium buck. That experience was the trophy for me. That was the “wall hanger” in my heart. I will NEVER forget October 1, 2008.

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Published by Mike on 02 Feb 2011

Blue Hunting Sight?

Looking at Viper sights for the wife. She wants one for her Passion but wants it in blue, not the Passion Pink one….anyone know if someone makes a blue sight not just knobs and scales (Sure-Loc)

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Published by jerryjking85 on 28 Jan 2011

Sponsor resume

Hi im trying to get sponsored but i need to send a resume does anyone know how to do a good resume or has an example? if so please email me at jerry.kingjr@us.army.mil Thank ya’ll for your time

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Published by jodimark on 26 Jan 2011

janesville bowmen, beginners archery class

the janesville bowmen archery club in janesville wisconsin, is hosting beginners archry classes now through march, ages 8 to adult my come out and learn the safe and proper method to shoot a bow. we will supply all the equipment you will need to learn its fun for the whole family, men, women, boys and girls. to reserve your time slot call 608-774-7265.

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Published by NYI1927 on 18 Jan 2011

CBC 2011 Sportsmen’s Banquet

I wanted to let people in North Eastern Indiana know about a fantastic Sportsmen’s banquet our church puts on every year.

Our purpose is to share with men, woman, and children our love for the outdoors as well as our passion for Jesus Christ.

This year our speaker is Brad Herndon. He and his wife have done outdoor writing on a national level for 23 years, and do assignment photography for Realtree Camouflage, Nikon, Hoyt bows, Remington Arms, Thompson Center Arms, Cabela’s, and other outdoor companies. He is the author of the book, “Mapping Trophy Bucks.” Brad will share how to use topographical, aerial and plat maps to figure out how to put yourself in the best possible position to waylay deer, and especially trophy bucks.

This banquet will include a seminar on turkey hunting, dinner, displays from local vendors, as well as many prizes.

This year we are giving away a Parker Youth Bow for those under 14 and a Matthews Drenalin bow for those 15 & over!

When: Saturday, March 5th from 5-9 P.M. Doors Open at 4:45 P.M.
Where: The Ligonier Rec. Center 502 W Union Street Ligonier, IN.
Cost: It is free! There is a donation taken to offset some of the costs.

Space is limited. You can reserve your spot by calling the church at 260-761-2321 or by signing up at the Rec. Center.

For more information go to www.cospervillebc.com.

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Published by ArchersArchery on 14 Jan 2011

Lone Wolf Tree Stands

This is my first offical blog, so please bare with me!

We own a small Archery Pro-Shop in Midland, Mi. We just returned from the 2011 Archery Trade Show in Indiana. And the one thing that really stood out to us, was the fact that Lone Wolf  Tree Stands manufacturing has returned to the States!!!!!

We are  extremly excited to sell these Treestand as Made in the USA again!

Congradulations Lone Wolf!

-Archer’s Archery

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Published by toynrnd on 11 Jan 2011

Range finders

I would like some information about range finders I am getting ready to buy one I have been doing alot of reserch I am stuck on two of them now the nikon archers choice and the leuopuld rx II please help with any info thank you everyone

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Published by travissalinas on 11 Jan 2011

spot and stalk bobcat

while walking the roads we at the lease, the light was about finished
when we spotted a few deer, the fellow i was hunting with thought he
saw a yearling close to us, i watched it a bit longer because it was
acting a bit strange, turned out to be a cat prowling the road for
dinner. we closed the distance from about 275 yards down to about 80.
the cat was working its way towards us so i decided to back off into
the brush and wait for him to pass. a rabbit was evening making
squeaks in the brush, the center of the noise in a point puitting us
in the line of the cat. after waiting about 5 minutes, the lighting
was faint. i knew it was know or never, so i drew back my arrow and
started slipping towards the road, i could see a dark spot that looked
like a the bcat sitting on its haunches staring at me from about 15
yards away. if ever a sabo sight worked great, it was in this
sitution. it was so dark i had to use both eyes to see the dark spot
and i put my illuminated red dot on the center of what i believed to
be the cat shape and let loose. the other big perk of technology was
the lighted arrow nock. the notcturnal lit green and its arc contacted
something solid, followed by the crunch of rocks. the bobcat shape
exploded to lift in a magnificent flipping leap at least 5 foot
verticle and yowling a blood curdling noise, the cat sped away and i
ran fully into the road to watch him leave. my lighted nock had become
detached from the arrow, a sign of hitting something very hard and my
heart sunk. then i noticed fur and meat on the nock, game on! i found
a few drops of blood, then decided to let the cat sit a spell while we
picked up the truck, kim, and the secret weapon.

with a few pockets full of flashlights, we unfurled the secret weapon
and Slice immediately bristled at this new scent. down the trail of
fresh blood we went, Slice much more tense than normal. we followed
the cat through some of the thickest and nastiest brush that south
texas has to offer. slice would pass cleanly into the blackbrush and
cat claw thickets while we humans decided to meet her on the other
side. the first 300 yards of the trail were in a fairly straight line,
but in the last 100 yards, the cat had begun to curl back. we had good
blood and about twenty minutes and 400 yards into this trail all hell
broke loose.

fierce barking and angry growls eminated from a nasty thicket white
brush. chris, kim and myself got up into the action and the cat broke
away, slice hot on his heels and then she bayed him 10 yards away in
the thicket. Kim showed her true feelings about slice when slice began
yelping as kim screamed, “Slice, save Slice”. a 22 mag to the head and
the cat was ours! he weight about 31 lbs live and had a big block
head. Every was pretty pumped after the rumble and tumble through the
brush. Slice came away with only a scratch on her shoulder.

this cat is pretty special, it took a long time to finally get one,
and a great one he is. i plan to get him mounted in a fighting stance,
and when slice goes to doggie heaven, get her mounted in her attack
pose so they can be forever mounted in mortal combat.

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Published by RutNStrut2010 on 11 Jan 2011

2011 Archery Trade Show Bow review

I shot all of the bows available to be shot at the 2011 Archery Trade show in Indy. Bows ranking in top 5. #1 Elite Pulse, smooth draw, better than the judge, less hump in valley, same wall as before. #2 Bowtech Invasion… super smooth draw, good speed and no hand shock. #3 Hoyt Carbon Element …smooth draw, descent wall, no hand shock. #4 Athens Afflixtion nice wall, smooth draw, good price. #5 Winchester Quick silver 31, feels better than the 34, nice wall, good speed

 

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