Archive for the 'Tips/Advice' Category

2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by csinclair on 11 Apr 2008

One spring day – 3 friends shooting outdoors.

Looking out the window of my office at the overcast and rainy grey day, (which dictates that I probably won’t be lucky enough to get out to my outdoor range spot to shoot today), I am ever so grateful that I had the chance to go out yesterday, for the better part of the day with my cousin and one of my oldest friends to shoot and laugh and tell stories in what will be remembered as a great day of archery.

The other evening, just as I’d returned from the Bow-Shop, my cousin James called me on the phone, I proceeded to tell him about the recent modifications to my Martin Saber, (the peep sight installation), and how I’d just tuned it up to 60lbs., having shot compound bows in the past himself he took great interest and was open to my invite to come out shooting the next morning, I offered him the use of one of my recurves, (a Ragim Victory 66″ takedown), and he accepted. Shortly thereafter one of my oldest friends, (Dirk), called and I asked him if he cared to join us with the Bear Cherokee (oldshool fiberglass camp bow, my first bow), that I’d recently loaned him and he too accepted. Now we had an archery party and the following morning the 3 of us, after a brief gear check we headed out to the trail to make our way to the range spot for a day of archery.

We measured out 3 distances and each of us, having somewhat different bows, took turns shooting from these spots, Dirk shot mostly from 10 – 15 yards, while James shot mostly from 15 and I spent my time honing my grouping from 20 yards all day. We all had good shots and bad, by the end of it all we were all shooting much better than we’d started out at the beginning of the day, we all broke arrows on rocks with arrows as can be expected shooting outdoors, but it was all worth the comraderie and stories and hours of fun we had honing our skills and making plans for the next year or so and how we’ll all become bow hunters soon.

All in all a great day was had by all, one that will lead to many more similar days of target shooting, 3D shooting and eventually we’ll become a bow hunting party. All because of a day of outdoor shooting one spring day and the greater meaning of sport – fun, friendship and personal improvement .

1 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by Hyunchback on 11 Apr 2008

Another day of practice

Again I worked primarily on watching my shafts hit the target.

This may not seem special to others but I make no apologies for it. I wasn’t doing this before and it is very important to me today. It’s a new element to my form. I must not neglect it.

I lost another arrow today. My bow shoulder broke down at the same moment my release fired and the arrow went somewhere undiscovered. I’m down to 10 out of 12 shafts. As it was one of the remaining 4 that hadn’t lost their inserts I decided it was time to reduce all my remaining arrows to 32″. The shafts started out full length or around 32.5 inches.

Let’s examine why my form fizzled. This is, I suspect, due to my not yet being as strong as I need to be. I work strong and long on Tuesday and then Thursday is crap. Utter crap. Week after week.

The only reason I can figure out is that I have not yet recovered my shoulder muscles after Tuesday’s workout. I only get a minor workout with my walking stick on Sunday or Monday (If I go walking). Tuesday I’m rarin’ to go and may over-do it. Wednesday is a day of work and so Thursday is not the best. It’s a day for shooting so it’s not bad. Like pizza it’s not bad even when it’s not good.

It’s a day I get to go to the range and that’s not a bad thing.

A primary point, though, is to learn from form errors that I can pinpoint.

And to recognize what errors I’m eliminating. With the exception of fliers where the sights were not really on target as they should be I was eliminating inches from the left-right scattering.

It’s important to note that I’m claiming “eliminatING” not “eliminated”.

And it is important to note that I’m not trying to buy my way to perfection. Still the same bow. The same shafts (even if new inserts), the same sight and the same release. And the same shooter.

I’m getting better. That’s a good thing.

I’m no threat to the kings of 3D or 5 Spot or Vegas. Wish I were.

But I’ll outshoot my previous score in the archery league if we ever get another place to shoot for scores in the archery league.

This session, aside from the lost arrow, showed a SEVERE reduction in left-right scatter. I still have fliers that I am attributing to form flaws or imprecise aiming. But the majority of “good” shots are in a very narrow vertical impact column.

Now, why am I still having variations in my vertical distribution? The bow has a hard wall. I pull to it.

It’s possible that some of it is the imprecise sight picture.

What is important is that I have, minus fliers, reduced the left-right scatter of my groups at THIRTY yards.

Until recently I never shot past 20 yards.

Until recently I hadn’t been shooting bows at all.

I’m not regularly hitting a 30 yard target and could be hitting on the 40 yard target, twice my previous distance. Not yet as tight on groups as I feel I should be capable of but superior to my earlier efforts.

With just fiber optic pins for my sights.

The first monthly shoot will arrive on May 4, 2008. I expect to shoot better by then.

Since I completed practice with only 3 shafts still bearing inserts I decided to do arrow surgery before coming home.

I cut the extra half inch off the remaining shafts and tonight I cleaned and then epoxied new inserts into the shafts. Instead of Bohning’s Power Bond I’m using a 2 part epoxy called Two Ton Epoxy. Gold Tip rejects the use of hot glue on carbon shafts.

Without a measuring arrow I’m guessing that I’m currently set for 31″ on draw length. The bow mechanic had been required to change the BowTech Commander’s draw length radically over the previous owner’s draw length. I’m going to keep it at the 32″ mark for now as broadheads require some clearance.

My bow’s previous owner was over 12″ shorter than me. Not a put down of a man who is clearly a superior archer. Just a fact of our disparate heights.

2 votes, average: 2.50 out of 52 votes, average: 2.50 out of 52 votes, average: 2.50 out of 52 votes, average: 2.50 out of 52 votes, average: 2.50 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 2.50 out of 5)
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Published by csinclair on 09 Apr 2008

Spring, the time for practice and the pro shop

Hello sports fans,

In my last post I mentioned the difficulty of finding a place to shoot locally, (outdoors and legal according to the local by-laws in this part of Canada). My experiment was a success and I have found not one but several good places for shooting at some of the home made targets that I’ve made recently, (who says archery has to be expensive to get into). So after a morning of extensive scouting with the maps that I’d printed off from the by-law website on the discharge of firearms, (including bows and crossbows), for my local area, I easily found a few good spots, out of the way of passers by and hikers, where I could set up my targets and let some arrows fly.

What a great feeling, outside on a beautiful spring day enjoying my Martin and some Easton Lightspeed 400s. I enjoyed myself so much infact that after shooting probably a couple hundred arrows, straight ahead, at 20 / 30 / 40 yards and even greater distances, up hill, down hill and even through the brush, (just to make things interesting), my shooting was ok, but I noticed that my grouping was a little loose, so I had to go back to the shop today and have my bow tuned right up to it’s maximum draw weight and installed a peep sight for better accuracy.

While in the shop doing all this, during my test shots with the new peep sight, the fellow who owns the shop noticed my left hand position wasn’t optimal, my wrist was too high. Correcting the problem, I spent some time at the indoor range at the shop and immediately noticed that my grouping was tighter and my shot placement was much better almost like magic. I’m not sure if it’s my hand position or the new peep sight, probably the combination of the two together, but my shooting just jumped up a notch today and I’m really happy about it. It never ceases to amaze me how something as simple as a trip to the pro shop once and a while, with regular practice can really improve one’s skill level. Perhaps my new archery motto should be practice, practice, pro shop. 😉

I can’t wait to get out to the forest range tomorrow, some friends are coming out with me, I’ve agreed to loan them bows so that we can all enjoy some archery outdoors for the day with me, is there any better way to spend a spring day, while on one’s way to becoming a bow hunter.

Craig

4 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 54 votes, average: 2.00 out of 5 (4 votes, average: 2.00 out of 5)
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Published by Hyunchback on 08 Apr 2008

An eye opening revelation

Literally.

Today as I practiced I was finally able to keep my eyes on the target as I fired. Partly by not squeezing my non-aiming eye fully closed, making it easier to watch the arrow all the way to the target.

This hardly ever happened before for me. It’s like a new portion of my form that I was finally able to bring into my shot sequence.

Literally. My groups tightened up. I resolved from that point to devote the rest of my session keeping my eyes on the arrows as they hit the target.

No, I didn’t magically turn into a threat to the 3D champions. I just found something that I’d been missing that was resulting in many, many random misses. It’s a wonder that my arrows ever hit the center. I was flinching.

3 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 5 (3 votes, average: 2.33 out of 5)
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Published by Suttle1976 on 08 Apr 2008

A New Start At An Old Hobby

I was first bitten by the archery bug when I was 14 years old. Me and my best friend both got new bows one Christmas. I received a Hoyt Raider that I loved until someone told me it was considered “Youth”  bow. The bow was great but I was not a youth I 14 years old and knew everything.  I must have shot every day, in every spare minute for three years straight. I had that little bow cranked down all the way and was getting every bit of 60 pound out of it. My accuracy was dead on up to 40 yards and I could keep a pattern so tight that even the old guys that worked at the indoor range where we shot were impressed. AS time went on I meet a girl and she was the farthest thing from a “youth” model I had ever seen. So needless to say my bow shooting days slowly faded out. I always keep an interest in archery and would go take a look at the bows every time I was at the sporting goods store and told my self “One day”. So here I am 31 years old and that day has finally come. Oh but how things have changed. Technology has really pushed the sport to new levels and the bows that have evolved are highly tuned and can be adjusted to fit anyone and any type of shooting style. Even with all the changes the one thing that remains is the feeling you get when you shoot a bow and hit your mark. The total control, the fact that what you put into the bow is what you get out. I am sure that this is the same feeling that native Americans got when they shot their bows for food or just to shoot. Its not the type of bow or how fast it shoots or weather it is a “youth” model or not, these thing can help but the feeling is all the same from the youngster at summer camp who puts one in the yellow for the first time to the professional hunter taking down wild game season after season. Once you get that feeling weather for the first time or the hundredth time you know what archery is all about and why it has stood the test of time. So you will be happy to know that I bought a new bow last week and can’t wait to get out their and start shooting all over again.

5 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (5 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by csinclair on 07 Apr 2008

The Urban Archers Outdoor Range and ByLaws (CDN)

Hi Folks,

In order to become a better archer and bow-hunter one needs to be accurate, (practice, practice, practice comes to mind), shooting tight groups consistently from various distances under any weather conditions from any position, (sitting, standing, crouching, up-hill or down-hill), one needs to practice much and do so in an outdoor setting which mirrors the real hunting environment as closely as possible.

It’s always been a challenge for me personally to find an appropriate place to shoot like this due to the fact that I’m living in a Canadian urban area where the by-laws specifically state that one may ‘not’ discharge a firearm, (including a bow), as the discharge of firearms is disallowed in most areas within, (and around), city limits.

Recently I had a very informative discussion with a gentleman who was a local bow hunter as well as being very well versed in the local by-laws, (we started talking archery when he noticed my bow-shop hat), possibly because he is studying to become an RCMP officer as well, he really helped set me straight on the facts, which I’d like to pass along to any other new bow-hunters / archers who may also benefit from the information that he shared with me.

The tip that he shared with me was simple really, just do your homework and search the internet for the local by-laws, which I found quite easily, in particular the by-law that governs the discharge of ‘firearms’ which includes bows and crossbows. Included with the by-law that governs the discharging of ‘firearms’ in the areas surrounding the city limits is a map, which showed me the exact areas where I could, (and could not), legally set up a ad-hoc range for myself and shoot outside all summer, up hill down hill through some trees, crouching, standing etc…

I’ve since scouted the area and am going out today with my bow to do some shooting, I’ll post some pictures as soon as I’m able.

Happy shooting,

Craig

2 votes, average: 3.50 out of 52 votes, average: 3.50 out of 52 votes, average: 3.50 out of 52 votes, average: 3.50 out of 52 votes, average: 3.50 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.50 out of 5)
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Published by X-Ecutioner2 on 06 Apr 2008

How to Pick the Perfect Hunting Arrow

           Choosing the right hunting arrow is one of the most crucial steps in having a successful hunt.  There are a lot of new arrows out there, all with their own special features and new colors and camo finishes, but how do you tell which is the best arrow?  Or more importantly, how do you tell which is the right arrow for you?  The following is the steps that I go through in determining which arrow to hunt with.  I hope this guide will help you in determining which arrow is best for you.

 

            Every year there are new arrows that come out.  In order for one of those arrows to replace the arrows I am currently shooting, they have to fare better than my current arrows in a technical evaluation, they have to be able to set up easily and consistently, and finally, they have to perform in actual shooting situations.  Let’s start with the technical evaluation.

 

            For the technical evaluation, I compare each arrow I am interested in, over 3 different fields.  First, I look to see if each arrow comes in a spine that I will be able to shoot.  Second, I compare the straightness and weight consistencies of each arrow.  And third, I compare the kinetic energy each arrow produces with my current set-up.

           

            The first evaluation is pretty simple.  I gather a group of arrows that I am interested in, from advertisements, web sites, catalogs, shows, and other places.  I then use an arrow chart supplied by the manufacturer, and use the draw weight of my bow, and my draw length to find the correct box.  If the arrow that I am interested in is in that box, then I let it move on to the second evaluation. 

 

            For the second evaluation, I then look at the advertised straightness of these arrows, and eliminate any that’s straightness tolerance is greater than .003.  After this first part of the elimination process, I then eliminate any of the arrows that are greater than 2 grains per arrow within the dozen.  Note:  Sometimes this is not advertised, and you will have to go to a pro-shop and weigh an individual dozen arrows. 

 

After the first and second evaluations, I am usually down to two or three kinds of arrows.  The third, and final technical evaluation, is to evaluate the kinetic energy of the arrows in my current set-up.  The formula for measuring kinetic energy is

(1/2)(mass)(velocity)²  If you have never used a formula like this before, it is important to remember to take the velocity times itself, then multiply that number by the mass of the arrow, and then divide it by 2.  In order to get the mass of the arrow, take the grains per inch of the arrows you are choosing between, and add in your point weight (including the insert), your vane weights, your nock weight, and about 10 grains for glue.  Getting the velocity is a little less exact science, unless you have a pro shop that will let you make up one of each arrows to shoot.  Usually what I do, is take an arrow that is similar to the weight of the arrows I am evaluating, and shoot it to get the velocity.  Most pro shops have a plethora of arrows of all different weights and sizes, and you can usually find one within 5 grains of the arrows you are evaluating.  Once you shoot these arrows over a chronograph, you have all of the pieces of the equation, and can start breaking them down.  Here is an example of how the equation works.  Let’s say my arrows weigh 350 grains, and shoot out of my bow at 300 fps.  The equation would look like this:

(1/2)(350)(300)² = 15,750,000  People always say the heavier the arrow the more kinetic energy, but this is not always true.  For example, let’s say my arrow weighs 450 grains, which drops my speed down to 250 fps.  The equation would look like this:

(1/2)(450)(250)² = 14,062,500.  That is why it is important to look at both mass and speed when evaluating kinetic energy. 

 

            After I have chosen the arrow that had the best results from my three technical evaluations, I buy a half dozen arrows, and go to work.  I set them up just like I would for hunting.  This is not an advertisement, so I will not list the equipment that I am using.  After they are set up, I make sure they tune quickly and consistently, and group very well; first with field points, and then with broadheads. 

           

            After I have determined that the arrows perform well in practice, I will set up my blind in my back yard, and shoot a target through the mesh netting.  If the arrows still perform well, I know that I have found my hunting arrows for the season.  However, many times I will end up shooting the same arrows I have been shooting, even after all of the work that I have put in determining which of the new ones is the best.  The bottom line is, if they can’t outperform the ones I am currently shooting, then why should I shoot them? 

 

            I hope this article has been helpful to you.  This is a pretty rigorous evaluation, but it has netted me nothing but good results, and I’m sure it will help you as well.  Good luck, and good shooting!

4 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5 (4 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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Published by gvdocholiday on 06 Apr 2008

Fixed Blade Broadheads…Tuning Perfection

I’m going to start this off by stating, ‘I love mechanical broadheads!!’ I love their field point accuracy, I love their large cutting diameters, and I love the fact that I can basically practice all summer with field points and not stress about having to tweak my bow just before the season opener.

Now, let me follow that up by confessing my…for lack of better word… ‘guilt’. I feel guilty for cheating, by not being as completely intimate with my bow hunting equipment as I should be. I refer to an intimacy one can only achieve by knowing their equipment inside and out, knowing what buttons to push, and what strings to twist. It’s funny really, that something that sound so complicated and time consuming, really takes no extra time at all.

It’s a safe bet that a solid majority of you reading this article are currently using a mechanical style broadhead, double or nothing says that at one time or another those of you currently using a mechanical head have tried fixed blade broadheads with less than satisfactory results. Am I warm?? Thought so…no need for applause just throw me money.

Let us try to recap your past experience with fixed blade broadheads: Some of you managed decent flight but had to re-sight in your bow for use of fixed blade broadheads due to not having the same POI as your field points; For some, no matter what you did you simply couldn’t get that fish tail out of your arrows flight plan.

Ok, those may not be everyone’s experiences to the letter…but they are mine. I am also proud to say that I have overcome those poor experiences and now, I head to the range/stand with an extreme feeling of accomplishment because I know that no matter what I thread on my arrows…as long is they share the same weight with my field points, they will also share the same point of impact.

I really cannot explain in words the wonderful feelings one experiences at the moment they finally accomplish shared POI between field points and broadheads, since I can’t, I’ll explain how to achieve them.

This is an in depth step-by-step tuning method that will have your field points and broadheads hitting the same POI…which really is the only true tell tale way to know for certain that your bow and arrows are tuned. A bullet through paper will only get you so far…broadhead tipped arrows will only get you so far…there’s no excuse for having to resight in for broadheads after practicing all year with your field points. For some of you this will be so dang easy, you’ll wonder why the heck nobody has explained this to you before.

1 – First things first…make sure the spine range of the arrow is matched to the preferred draw length/draw weight/point weight. Spin test each arrow with broadheads and with field points. If it wobbles, discard it. Wobbly arrows will never group with others and it’ll just lead to headaches. It’s best to weed those out before starting. Adjust just arrow rest for center shot basically by just eyeing it up…seriously, that’s all that is needed for this first step.

2 – Next, start shooting. You may have a little wobble in your flight but as long as you’re maintaining decent groups you’re all set for threading a broadhead. Paper tuning could also be done prior to this, but it’s not really necessary.

3 – At 20 yards and on a broadhead-approved target, shoot a broadhead tipped arrow at an aiming point. Where did it hit??? Lower, higher, right left??? If you’re arrow is spinned correctly, you should only have to move your rest 1/32″ in whatever direction or directions your broadhead missed the POI of your field points.

If you missed low of your field points, raise your rest/lower your nock point.

If you missed high of your field points, lower your rest/raise your nock point.

If you missed left of your field points then move your rest to the right.

If you missed right of your field points then move your rest to the left.

4 – Repeat steps 2 and 3 until your field points and broadheads have the same POI.

Hip, hip, hurray!! Wait, no?! Ok, trouble shooting time.

Elevation

No matter what adjustments are made, there are still vertical differences in impact. Things to look for: A) Rest spring tension…it could be too stiff or it could be too weak. Play with the tension and see how the arrows react. B) There may be fletching contact on the arrow rest, cables, or bow riser. Make sure there’s 100% clearance. C) dual cam bow…tiller needs to be adjusted. Add half a turn to the upper limb bolt or take half a turn out of the bottom. Observe the arrows reaction to these changes and adjust appropriately.

Windage
No matter what adjustments are made, there are still horizontal differences in impact. These are spine issues. This really is the difficult part, but not really difficult part(I know, oxymoron, forgive me). This is where the intimate relationship with ones bow really comes along because this is where arrow spine/draw weight mismatches really start to show. When one tunes a bow, they are tuning the bow around an arrow. There are so many variables that come into play when it comes to arrow spine that it’s not even funny. For all intensive purposes, draw weight will be the only variable we will play with. A bow can be paper tuned all nice and perfect but paper will not show an imperfect spine match with the bow. If you’re arrows are not spinned correctly it’s not going to show up on paper at 6 feet…it will however show up at 20 yards when your broadhead tipped arrow hits 4-6″ right/left of your field points POI.

Whatever you do, leave the rest at center shot. Keep your rests center shot no more than 1/32″ right/left of center. We’re going to play with draw weight the one step that nobody really thinks about because once they settle on a draw weight, they don’t want it to change.

More than anything, people try to shoot too weak of spinned arrows, so start by taking half a turn out of each limb bolt…shoot…repeat. Keep doing this process until the broadheads and field points come together to the same POI. In most cases adjustments shouldn’t have to exceed any more than one complete turn of each limb bolt. If the spread gets worse then go back the opposite way. The only down side to this is that you may end up a few lbs heavier or lighter in draw weight…but for your common MI whitetail, it shouldn’t matter.

Tingly Feeling
There you have it…not only are you completely tuned in for broadheads, but you now have the comfort and confidence of knowing that your bow pretty much cannot be tuned or tweaked any better, and you know everything is matched and the results are the most perfect flying arrow you could ever achieve.


2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by bowgod on 03 Apr 2008

hoyt tuning made easy (z3,c2,vector,zepher,and spiral cams)

Here is  VERY simple time tested method that I use for tuning most of the newer cam systems that Hoyt has introduced over the last few years. This method will also work with the popular cam 1/2 and cam 1/2+ systems as well as other hybrid cams (except binaries) with just the possiblility of a little more work than outlined here.

The fist thing that need to be is you need to determine all the advertised specs for your paticular bow/cam combination. (find all the specs on the hoyt tune charts under the customer service link on Hoyt’s web site) you need to know string and cable lengths as well as draw length, draw weight, axle to axle and brace height measurements. Write all the numbers down on a peice of paper and keep it handy.

Now onto the tuning process.

STEP 1: press the bow and remove the string and cables. You want to measure each cable and twist it down to where it measures 1/8 of an inch shorter than the listed lengths (be sure the string is straight and stretched out for this measurement often times the ends are still bent where the end serving wraps around the cam these need to be straightend). with each cable twisted 1/8 shorter than listed specs put the cables back on the bow and move onto the string.

STEP 2: Basically you want to do the same thing with the string but with the string twist it down to 3/16 of an inch shorter than listed length, then put it back on the bow.

STEP 3: From this point everything is going to be close, take the bow out of the press and start checking all the specs. First tighten both limb bolts all the way down, then check the performance marks on the cam. (in every bow i have worked on excluding the regular cam 1/2 the performance marks are right on by this point, with the cam 1/2 you may need to mess with the control cable just a bit to get the performance marks right) Now that the performance marks are on check your ATA and brace height, in most cases the ATA will be right on and the brace may run just a little on the long side, once you check this move onto draw stop timing. using a draw board or have someone draw the bow for you and watch the cams. The draw stop on the top cam should hit the cable at the same time as the draw stop on the bottom cam. If the bottom is hitting before the top your top cam is under rotated, and vice versa, if the top cam is hitting first. From here more than likely you will need to make some minor adjustments, if the top cam is under rotated you can either add twist to the buss cable or take twist out of the control cable. I always use the control cable for under rotated top cam unless my ATA is coming in on the long side or if the brace height is coming in too short (for me either of these are a rarity) i say this because twisting and untwisting the bess cable will have a greater impact on the ATA and brace height than messing with the control cable. Now if the top cam is over rotated you basicaly do the opposite either take twist out of the buss cable or add twist to the control cable. (for these adjustments i ussually use the buss cable because as previously stated the brace height may be running a little long and untwisting the buss cable will fix that, if the ATA  and brace height are already on then i will use the control cable for this as well.  Make these adjustments in small increments it don’t take many twist to get it right.

STEP 4: Now that you have that all done you need to check the AMO draw length and make sure it is at spec. To do this draw the bow and have someone mark your arrow right at the center of the rest hole (AMO draw length measurements are measured from the nock groove to the pivot point of the grip wich happens to be right in line with the center of the rest hole so measureing to the rest hole just makes this a little easier.) Now measure from the inside of the nock groove to the mark on your arrow and then add 1.75 inches to that measurement, this will reflect the AMO draw length of the bow. Twist or untwist the string from here to get the AMO draw length set right to where it needs to be. If your measurement is saying it’s too long then add a few twist to the string if it’s too short take a few out (5 twist either way = aprox. 1/4 inch) once you get the AMO draw length set right double check the max weight of the bow and from here you should be done.

If for any reason you get to any step and notice that something is way off from where it is supposed to be start over at step one because more than likely one of the measurements was off. If the problem still isn’t fixed feel free to contact me on WWW.ARCHERYTALK.COM under the username BOWGOD and i will gladly walk you through it the best i can.

I have been personally using this method for years now and in every case this method has gotten me so close to perfect the first time around, just a few small adjustments after you put it all back together after step 2 and the bow is ready to rock. I have tried several tuning methods over the years and this is by far the easiest way to get my bows tuned right into their sweet spot with no headaches.

Good luck and shoot straight.

1 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by wyojon137 on 02 Apr 2008

Just Some Notes

I really love the Idea of this blog and article page.  I think it will really give all of us a chance to express our views on the subjects we cover here without to much bickering.  I definatley encourage comments and replys to posts, but archery opinions are like a**holes, everyone has one and I will be the first to admit that I definatley have my own, but I don’t think we should press them on eachother so negativley.  Hopefully I am making sence to some of you and not just rambling.  Anyway I plan on using this site quite regularly, not for the contest although that is a definite perk, but just for its atmosphere. 

Anyway I was reading the admin. anouncements and some of the sujested topics to write about and I came across the one on the best ATV and thought I would say a few words about it.  Now don’t take the following wrong as I own an ATV myself, but I really think that the best ATV is the one that you leave at camp.  Of coarse there are certain reasons that a hunter might have to use an ATV to hunt (like a disability) but the outdoors was definitley not created to hunt or really even get around on a four wheeler.  I really think, and I may be being stereotypical here, that more people need to get out on foot or even horseback and really enjoy the outdoors.  The way that they were intended to be enjoyed.  Not only will you see more game, but I guarentee that when you do get what creature your after, you will be much more pleased with yourself.  I know I feel a great sence of acomplishment, pride, honor and heritage when I take game.  My fore fathers never had ATVs and to be honest, I don’t think that they would have used them.  Anyway, get out there and enjoy the wonderful outdoors.  Even if it on an ATV, but you might try leaving it at camp sometime, you will be suprised at what you never saw before or haven’t seen in a while.

JON  

 

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