Archive for the 'Tips/Advice' Category

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Published by Hyunchback on 08 Apr 2008

An eye opening revelation

Literally.

Today as I practiced I was finally able to keep my eyes on the target as I fired. Partly by not squeezing my non-aiming eye fully closed, making it easier to watch the arrow all the way to the target.

This hardly ever happened before for me. It’s like a new portion of my form that I was finally able to bring into my shot sequence.

Literally. My groups tightened up. I resolved from that point to devote the rest of my session keeping my eyes on the arrows as they hit the target.

No, I didn’t magically turn into a threat to the 3D champions. I just found something that I’d been missing that was resulting in many, many random misses. It’s a wonder that my arrows ever hit the center. I was flinching.

3 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 53 votes, average: 2.33 out of 5 (3 votes, average: 2.33 out of 5)
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Published by Suttle1976 on 08 Apr 2008

A New Start At An Old Hobby

I was first bitten by the archery bug when I was 14 years old. Me and my best friend both got new bows one Christmas. I received a Hoyt Raider that I loved until someone told me it was considered “Youth”  bow. The bow was great but I was not a youth I 14 years old and knew everything.  I must have shot every day, in every spare minute for three years straight. I had that little bow cranked down all the way and was getting every bit of 60 pound out of it. My accuracy was dead on up to 40 yards and I could keep a pattern so tight that even the old guys that worked at the indoor range where we shot were impressed. AS time went on I meet a girl and she was the farthest thing from a “youth” model I had ever seen. So needless to say my bow shooting days slowly faded out. I always keep an interest in archery and would go take a look at the bows every time I was at the sporting goods store and told my self “One day”. So here I am 31 years old and that day has finally come. Oh but how things have changed. Technology has really pushed the sport to new levels and the bows that have evolved are highly tuned and can be adjusted to fit anyone and any type of shooting style. Even with all the changes the one thing that remains is the feeling you get when you shoot a bow and hit your mark. The total control, the fact that what you put into the bow is what you get out. I am sure that this is the same feeling that native Americans got when they shot their bows for food or just to shoot. Its not the type of bow or how fast it shoots or weather it is a “youth” model or not, these thing can help but the feeling is all the same from the youngster at summer camp who puts one in the yellow for the first time to the professional hunter taking down wild game season after season. Once you get that feeling weather for the first time or the hundredth time you know what archery is all about and why it has stood the test of time. So you will be happy to know that I bought a new bow last week and can’t wait to get out their and start shooting all over again.

5 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 55 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (5 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by csinclair on 07 Apr 2008

The Urban Archers Outdoor Range and ByLaws (CDN)

Hi Folks,

In order to become a better archer and bow-hunter one needs to be accurate, (practice, practice, practice comes to mind), shooting tight groups consistently from various distances under any weather conditions from any position, (sitting, standing, crouching, up-hill or down-hill), one needs to practice much and do so in an outdoor setting which mirrors the real hunting environment as closely as possible.

It’s always been a challenge for me personally to find an appropriate place to shoot like this due to the fact that I’m living in a Canadian urban area where the by-laws specifically state that one may ‘not’ discharge a firearm, (including a bow), as the discharge of firearms is disallowed in most areas within, (and around), city limits.

Recently I had a very informative discussion with a gentleman who was a local bow hunter as well as being very well versed in the local by-laws, (we started talking archery when he noticed my bow-shop hat), possibly because he is studying to become an RCMP officer as well, he really helped set me straight on the facts, which I’d like to pass along to any other new bow-hunters / archers who may also benefit from the information that he shared with me.

The tip that he shared with me was simple really, just do your homework and search the internet for the local by-laws, which I found quite easily, in particular the by-law that governs the discharge of ‘firearms’ which includes bows and crossbows. Included with the by-law that governs the discharging of ‘firearms’ in the areas surrounding the city limits is a map, which showed me the exact areas where I could, (and could not), legally set up a ad-hoc range for myself and shoot outside all summer, up hill down hill through some trees, crouching, standing etc…

I’ve since scouted the area and am going out today with my bow to do some shooting, I’ll post some pictures as soon as I’m able.

Happy shooting,

Craig

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Published by X-Ecutioner2 on 06 Apr 2008

How to Pick the Perfect Hunting Arrow

           Choosing the right hunting arrow is one of the most crucial steps in having a successful hunt.  There are a lot of new arrows out there, all with their own special features and new colors and camo finishes, but how do you tell which is the best arrow?  Or more importantly, how do you tell which is the right arrow for you?  The following is the steps that I go through in determining which arrow to hunt with.  I hope this guide will help you in determining which arrow is best for you.

 

            Every year there are new arrows that come out.  In order for one of those arrows to replace the arrows I am currently shooting, they have to fare better than my current arrows in a technical evaluation, they have to be able to set up easily and consistently, and finally, they have to perform in actual shooting situations.  Let’s start with the technical evaluation.

 

            For the technical evaluation, I compare each arrow I am interested in, over 3 different fields.  First, I look to see if each arrow comes in a spine that I will be able to shoot.  Second, I compare the straightness and weight consistencies of each arrow.  And third, I compare the kinetic energy each arrow produces with my current set-up.

           

            The first evaluation is pretty simple.  I gather a group of arrows that I am interested in, from advertisements, web sites, catalogs, shows, and other places.  I then use an arrow chart supplied by the manufacturer, and use the draw weight of my bow, and my draw length to find the correct box.  If the arrow that I am interested in is in that box, then I let it move on to the second evaluation. 

 

            For the second evaluation, I then look at the advertised straightness of these arrows, and eliminate any that’s straightness tolerance is greater than .003.  After this first part of the elimination process, I then eliminate any of the arrows that are greater than 2 grains per arrow within the dozen.  Note:  Sometimes this is not advertised, and you will have to go to a pro-shop and weigh an individual dozen arrows. 

 

After the first and second evaluations, I am usually down to two or three kinds of arrows.  The third, and final technical evaluation, is to evaluate the kinetic energy of the arrows in my current set-up.  The formula for measuring kinetic energy is

(1/2)(mass)(velocity)²  If you have never used a formula like this before, it is important to remember to take the velocity times itself, then multiply that number by the mass of the arrow, and then divide it by 2.  In order to get the mass of the arrow, take the grains per inch of the arrows you are choosing between, and add in your point weight (including the insert), your vane weights, your nock weight, and about 10 grains for glue.  Getting the velocity is a little less exact science, unless you have a pro shop that will let you make up one of each arrows to shoot.  Usually what I do, is take an arrow that is similar to the weight of the arrows I am evaluating, and shoot it to get the velocity.  Most pro shops have a plethora of arrows of all different weights and sizes, and you can usually find one within 5 grains of the arrows you are evaluating.  Once you shoot these arrows over a chronograph, you have all of the pieces of the equation, and can start breaking them down.  Here is an example of how the equation works.  Let’s say my arrows weigh 350 grains, and shoot out of my bow at 300 fps.  The equation would look like this:

(1/2)(350)(300)² = 15,750,000  People always say the heavier the arrow the more kinetic energy, but this is not always true.  For example, let’s say my arrow weighs 450 grains, which drops my speed down to 250 fps.  The equation would look like this:

(1/2)(450)(250)² = 14,062,500.  That is why it is important to look at both mass and speed when evaluating kinetic energy. 

 

            After I have chosen the arrow that had the best results from my three technical evaluations, I buy a half dozen arrows, and go to work.  I set them up just like I would for hunting.  This is not an advertisement, so I will not list the equipment that I am using.  After they are set up, I make sure they tune quickly and consistently, and group very well; first with field points, and then with broadheads. 

           

            After I have determined that the arrows perform well in practice, I will set up my blind in my back yard, and shoot a target through the mesh netting.  If the arrows still perform well, I know that I have found my hunting arrows for the season.  However, many times I will end up shooting the same arrows I have been shooting, even after all of the work that I have put in determining which of the new ones is the best.  The bottom line is, if they can’t outperform the ones I am currently shooting, then why should I shoot them? 

 

            I hope this article has been helpful to you.  This is a pretty rigorous evaluation, but it has netted me nothing but good results, and I’m sure it will help you as well.  Good luck, and good shooting!

4 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 54 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5 (4 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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Published by gvdocholiday on 06 Apr 2008

Fixed Blade Broadheads…Tuning Perfection

I’m going to start this off by stating, ‘I love mechanical broadheads!!’ I love their field point accuracy, I love their large cutting diameters, and I love the fact that I can basically practice all summer with field points and not stress about having to tweak my bow just before the season opener.

Now, let me follow that up by confessing my…for lack of better word… ‘guilt’. I feel guilty for cheating, by not being as completely intimate with my bow hunting equipment as I should be. I refer to an intimacy one can only achieve by knowing their equipment inside and out, knowing what buttons to push, and what strings to twist. It’s funny really, that something that sound so complicated and time consuming, really takes no extra time at all.

It’s a safe bet that a solid majority of you reading this article are currently using a mechanical style broadhead, double or nothing says that at one time or another those of you currently using a mechanical head have tried fixed blade broadheads with less than satisfactory results. Am I warm?? Thought so…no need for applause just throw me money.

Let us try to recap your past experience with fixed blade broadheads: Some of you managed decent flight but had to re-sight in your bow for use of fixed blade broadheads due to not having the same POI as your field points; For some, no matter what you did you simply couldn’t get that fish tail out of your arrows flight plan.

Ok, those may not be everyone’s experiences to the letter…but they are mine. I am also proud to say that I have overcome those poor experiences and now, I head to the range/stand with an extreme feeling of accomplishment because I know that no matter what I thread on my arrows…as long is they share the same weight with my field points, they will also share the same point of impact.

I really cannot explain in words the wonderful feelings one experiences at the moment they finally accomplish shared POI between field points and broadheads, since I can’t, I’ll explain how to achieve them.

This is an in depth step-by-step tuning method that will have your field points and broadheads hitting the same POI…which really is the only true tell tale way to know for certain that your bow and arrows are tuned. A bullet through paper will only get you so far…broadhead tipped arrows will only get you so far…there’s no excuse for having to resight in for broadheads after practicing all year with your field points. For some of you this will be so dang easy, you’ll wonder why the heck nobody has explained this to you before.

1 – First things first…make sure the spine range of the arrow is matched to the preferred draw length/draw weight/point weight. Spin test each arrow with broadheads and with field points. If it wobbles, discard it. Wobbly arrows will never group with others and it’ll just lead to headaches. It’s best to weed those out before starting. Adjust just arrow rest for center shot basically by just eyeing it up…seriously, that’s all that is needed for this first step.

2 – Next, start shooting. You may have a little wobble in your flight but as long as you’re maintaining decent groups you’re all set for threading a broadhead. Paper tuning could also be done prior to this, but it’s not really necessary.

3 – At 20 yards and on a broadhead-approved target, shoot a broadhead tipped arrow at an aiming point. Where did it hit??? Lower, higher, right left??? If you’re arrow is spinned correctly, you should only have to move your rest 1/32″ in whatever direction or directions your broadhead missed the POI of your field points.

If you missed low of your field points, raise your rest/lower your nock point.

If you missed high of your field points, lower your rest/raise your nock point.

If you missed left of your field points then move your rest to the right.

If you missed right of your field points then move your rest to the left.

4 – Repeat steps 2 and 3 until your field points and broadheads have the same POI.

Hip, hip, hurray!! Wait, no?! Ok, trouble shooting time.

Elevation

No matter what adjustments are made, there are still vertical differences in impact. Things to look for: A) Rest spring tension…it could be too stiff or it could be too weak. Play with the tension and see how the arrows react. B) There may be fletching contact on the arrow rest, cables, or bow riser. Make sure there’s 100% clearance. C) dual cam bow…tiller needs to be adjusted. Add half a turn to the upper limb bolt or take half a turn out of the bottom. Observe the arrows reaction to these changes and adjust appropriately.

Windage
No matter what adjustments are made, there are still horizontal differences in impact. These are spine issues. This really is the difficult part, but not really difficult part(I know, oxymoron, forgive me). This is where the intimate relationship with ones bow really comes along because this is where arrow spine/draw weight mismatches really start to show. When one tunes a bow, they are tuning the bow around an arrow. There are so many variables that come into play when it comes to arrow spine that it’s not even funny. For all intensive purposes, draw weight will be the only variable we will play with. A bow can be paper tuned all nice and perfect but paper will not show an imperfect spine match with the bow. If you’re arrows are not spinned correctly it’s not going to show up on paper at 6 feet…it will however show up at 20 yards when your broadhead tipped arrow hits 4-6″ right/left of your field points POI.

Whatever you do, leave the rest at center shot. Keep your rests center shot no more than 1/32″ right/left of center. We’re going to play with draw weight the one step that nobody really thinks about because once they settle on a draw weight, they don’t want it to change.

More than anything, people try to shoot too weak of spinned arrows, so start by taking half a turn out of each limb bolt…shoot…repeat. Keep doing this process until the broadheads and field points come together to the same POI. In most cases adjustments shouldn’t have to exceed any more than one complete turn of each limb bolt. If the spread gets worse then go back the opposite way. The only down side to this is that you may end up a few lbs heavier or lighter in draw weight…but for your common MI whitetail, it shouldn’t matter.

Tingly Feeling
There you have it…not only are you completely tuned in for broadheads, but you now have the comfort and confidence of knowing that your bow pretty much cannot be tuned or tweaked any better, and you know everything is matched and the results are the most perfect flying arrow you could ever achieve.


2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 52 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by bowgod on 03 Apr 2008

hoyt tuning made easy (z3,c2,vector,zepher,and spiral cams)

Here is  VERY simple time tested method that I use for tuning most of the newer cam systems that Hoyt has introduced over the last few years. This method will also work with the popular cam 1/2 and cam 1/2+ systems as well as other hybrid cams (except binaries) with just the possiblility of a little more work than outlined here.

The fist thing that need to be is you need to determine all the advertised specs for your paticular bow/cam combination. (find all the specs on the hoyt tune charts under the customer service link on Hoyt’s web site) you need to know string and cable lengths as well as draw length, draw weight, axle to axle and brace height measurements. Write all the numbers down on a peice of paper and keep it handy.

Now onto the tuning process.

STEP 1: press the bow and remove the string and cables. You want to measure each cable and twist it down to where it measures 1/8 of an inch shorter than the listed lengths (be sure the string is straight and stretched out for this measurement often times the ends are still bent where the end serving wraps around the cam these need to be straightend). with each cable twisted 1/8 shorter than listed specs put the cables back on the bow and move onto the string.

STEP 2: Basically you want to do the same thing with the string but with the string twist it down to 3/16 of an inch shorter than listed length, then put it back on the bow.

STEP 3: From this point everything is going to be close, take the bow out of the press and start checking all the specs. First tighten both limb bolts all the way down, then check the performance marks on the cam. (in every bow i have worked on excluding the regular cam 1/2 the performance marks are right on by this point, with the cam 1/2 you may need to mess with the control cable just a bit to get the performance marks right) Now that the performance marks are on check your ATA and brace height, in most cases the ATA will be right on and the brace may run just a little on the long side, once you check this move onto draw stop timing. using a draw board or have someone draw the bow for you and watch the cams. The draw stop on the top cam should hit the cable at the same time as the draw stop on the bottom cam. If the bottom is hitting before the top your top cam is under rotated, and vice versa, if the top cam is hitting first. From here more than likely you will need to make some minor adjustments, if the top cam is under rotated you can either add twist to the buss cable or take twist out of the control cable. I always use the control cable for under rotated top cam unless my ATA is coming in on the long side or if the brace height is coming in too short (for me either of these are a rarity) i say this because twisting and untwisting the bess cable will have a greater impact on the ATA and brace height than messing with the control cable. Now if the top cam is over rotated you basicaly do the opposite either take twist out of the buss cable or add twist to the control cable. (for these adjustments i ussually use the buss cable because as previously stated the brace height may be running a little long and untwisting the buss cable will fix that, if the ATA  and brace height are already on then i will use the control cable for this as well.  Make these adjustments in small increments it don’t take many twist to get it right.

STEP 4: Now that you have that all done you need to check the AMO draw length and make sure it is at spec. To do this draw the bow and have someone mark your arrow right at the center of the rest hole (AMO draw length measurements are measured from the nock groove to the pivot point of the grip wich happens to be right in line with the center of the rest hole so measureing to the rest hole just makes this a little easier.) Now measure from the inside of the nock groove to the mark on your arrow and then add 1.75 inches to that measurement, this will reflect the AMO draw length of the bow. Twist or untwist the string from here to get the AMO draw length set right to where it needs to be. If your measurement is saying it’s too long then add a few twist to the string if it’s too short take a few out (5 twist either way = aprox. 1/4 inch) once you get the AMO draw length set right double check the max weight of the bow and from here you should be done.

If for any reason you get to any step and notice that something is way off from where it is supposed to be start over at step one because more than likely one of the measurements was off. If the problem still isn’t fixed feel free to contact me on WWW.ARCHERYTALK.COM under the username BOWGOD and i will gladly walk you through it the best i can.

I have been personally using this method for years now and in every case this method has gotten me so close to perfect the first time around, just a few small adjustments after you put it all back together after step 2 and the bow is ready to rock. I have tried several tuning methods over the years and this is by far the easiest way to get my bows tuned right into their sweet spot with no headaches.

Good luck and shoot straight.

1 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 51 vote, average: 3.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
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Published by wyojon137 on 02 Apr 2008

Just Some Notes

I really love the Idea of this blog and article page.  I think it will really give all of us a chance to express our views on the subjects we cover here without to much bickering.  I definatley encourage comments and replys to posts, but archery opinions are like a**holes, everyone has one and I will be the first to admit that I definatley have my own, but I don’t think we should press them on eachother so negativley.  Hopefully I am making sence to some of you and not just rambling.  Anyway I plan on using this site quite regularly, not for the contest although that is a definite perk, but just for its atmosphere. 

Anyway I was reading the admin. anouncements and some of the sujested topics to write about and I came across the one on the best ATV and thought I would say a few words about it.  Now don’t take the following wrong as I own an ATV myself, but I really think that the best ATV is the one that you leave at camp.  Of coarse there are certain reasons that a hunter might have to use an ATV to hunt (like a disability) but the outdoors was definitley not created to hunt or really even get around on a four wheeler.  I really think, and I may be being stereotypical here, that more people need to get out on foot or even horseback and really enjoy the outdoors.  The way that they were intended to be enjoyed.  Not only will you see more game, but I guarentee that when you do get what creature your after, you will be much more pleased with yourself.  I know I feel a great sence of acomplishment, pride, honor and heritage when I take game.  My fore fathers never had ATVs and to be honest, I don’t think that they would have used them.  Anyway, get out there and enjoy the wonderful outdoors.  Even if it on an ATV, but you might try leaving it at camp sometime, you will be suprised at what you never saw before or haven’t seen in a while.

JON  

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Published by CLB on 31 Mar 2008

Field Photos – Preserve the Moment Forever

In the heat of the moment when we are hunting sometimes we forget to document our successes with a field photo or two.  Nothing brings back the memory of a hunt like a well taken photo.   Alot of photos end up being taken in the back of the truck or on the garage floor.  These types of photos while documenting our deer do not capture the essence of the hunt like we really want them to.  It only takes a few minutes to get good field photos and the photos will last a lifetime and bring back a flood of memories like the hunt happened only yesterday.  Field photos do not require any special equipment and even a point and shoot camera in the backpack will work.  What is really important is how you set up and compose the photo.  In the next few paragraphs I will try and set out a few guidlines for taking good field photos. 

The first step in getting a good field photo is to clean the animal up a bit before taking the photo.  Blood is a natural part of our sport but excessive blood can be distasteful even to other hunters.  Wipe off as much blood from the animal as you can and clean up around the mouth a bit.  Make sure the tongue is not hanging out.  If the tongue will not stay in the mouth you can go as far as cutting it off.  If you can, tuck the legs up under the animal for the photo.  This is not always possible if the animal has stiffened up or it is a very large animal like a moose.  Next try to  have the animal in its natural landscape, not in the truck or on the garage floor.  Have the animal set up so that there is not too much clutter in the background.  Clutter in the background such as bushes will make the antlers hard to distinguish.  If possible try and have the antlers against a clear sky.  Also make sure that there is no clutter in front of the animal.  Try  and clear any debris such as sticks, grass or other items which may cover any part of the animal. 

When setting up to take the photo try and get as low to the ground as possible.  Even lay on your belly if you have to.  Getting down on the animals level will give a more natural aspect to the photo and fully show off your trophy.  Try not to stand over the animal and hunter and shoot down on them.  Try and keep the sun at your back if possible or off to the side.  Taking photos with the sun at the hunters back will cause you to lose detail in the photo and can cause unsightly lens flares and can totally black out the hunter and animal with point and shoot cameras.  One thing to be careful of, as the photographer with the sun at your back, is to make sure your shadow is not in the photo.  If the hunter is wearing a hat the sun may cast a shadow across his face which will black it out in the photo.  If this is the case have the hunter remove his hat for the photo or use fill flash to brighten the hunters face.  If it is dark out make sure to use a flash or if possible you can wait and get photos the next morning.  This is not always an option with bowhunting as many times it is quite warm out and taking care to salvage the meat is very important.   Take many different angles of the animal and hunter,  this way you will always get an angle which will look the best in photos.  Fill the frame with the hunter and his or her trophy.  Having the animal and the hunter too small in the photo brings too many other distracting objects into the photo and makes the hunter and animal hard to see.   Try and not have the hunter hold the animal out at arms length in an attempt to make the animal look bigger.  This just gives an unnatural appearance to the animal.  Do not have the hunter straddle the deer.  It is best to have the hunter kneel or sit in behind the animal.   Try and have the hunter smile, this should be a happy moment.  If you are alone in the feild you do not have to go without a field photo.  Carry a small tripod with you or use a log or your backpack as a rest and use the self timer on your camera.  This can sometimes  take a little time to get a good photo but with digital cameras it is easy to check your photos and make sure you have a good one.

Field photos do not have to only be of the hunter and his or her trophy.  Photos of the hunter as they are hunting or sitting in their blinds or treestands also make great memories of the hunts.  Photos of your hunting buddies sitting around the camfire after a day hunting make great keepsakes.  Take photos of your hunting dogs or decoy spreads while bird hunting.  Anything that will help you remeber the day makes a great photo.    Hopefully these tips will help you capture that special moment the next time you are out hunting, and you can look back on your hunts and remember them for years to come.

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Published by mark kennedy on 30 Mar 2008

Back Tension And Target Panic

Hey everybody,

I know how frustrating it can be learning to use a true backtension release.  I know how much time and effort must be put into the practice and proper execution of a backtension release.  I am definatly not a perfect back tension shooter, heck just today I had a lot of problems getting my back tension to go off at a local tournament.  But I have been shooting with a back tension for 2.5 yrs and i think it i may be able to help some new guys get into it with a lot less frustration than i had, by informing people of the many ways not to start learning a back tension.

 I started 2.5 yrs ago with a tru-ball ultra 3 backtension release.  I had just started to get into spot shooting and was struggling with TARGET PANIC.  Everybody gets it at one time or another, and boy is it troublesome.  I was having such a problem i almost gave up shooting all together.  Finally i was in my archery shop one day and was discussing possible ways to get rid of target panic when one of the pros that frequent the shop told me about the back tension release. 

He explained to me the ideal shot,what he called a SURPRISE SHOT. The purpose of the surprise shot was to 1 reduce the urge to punch the release creating steady grouped shots 2. reducing the ability to predict when the shot was going off enabling the shooter to keep from grabbing or torquing the bow as it arrow leaves the rest.

 It sounded like a miracle to me, like the locked door to better scores that i sttod before had just swung open.  I bought a backtension and couldn’t wait to try it.  So I got my bow, loaded an arrow, and stepped to the twenty yard line. That was my first mistake, when shooting a backtension the first few times, even if you have read all about them and seen people shoot them if you have never shot one yourself than pull a bail to five yards.  I didn’t get my bow back 6 in, when that release tripped and that arrow went straight into the wood next to the twenty yard bail.

Always start at five yards, it is the most important thing, Also take your sight off, start by just trying to get the release back.  If available have somebody who shoots a backtension CORRECTLY watch you and comment on your form and technique.  Once you are able to get it fully drawn follow these steps to help get you started, a variation or simplification of these steps is fine whatever works for you because you are the one shooting the release.

1. set your rear shoulder so that your rear forearm is parallel to the ground and in a locked comfortable position.

2. set your front shoulder/arm in a broken arm fashion, you don’t want your arm locked out, this can cause yu to strap yourself and will make it hard to use a backtension.  You only want your arm to be slightly bent.

3. set your release hand to a TOUCH POINT on your face that is easily remembered and does not move your front or rear setup.

4. Aim

5.while you continue to aim push the bow into the target with your shoulder not with your elbow as this will cause inconsistent pressure, as you focus on the x on the target, the pin may move but just focus on the target, push the bow into the target.  At the same time pull with your release hand into the wall behind you as if you are going to drive your elbow into the wall.

6. keep focusing on the target, pushing and pulling, and before your ready more than likely that shot will be gone, if you anticipated the shot, you did wnot follow correct form, maybe you pulled with your outside fing er instead of pulling straight back, this is called TRIPPING THE RELEASE.

TRIPPING THE RELEASE is the process of turning a backtension release to the point that the hinge releases the bow.  This form is inconsistent and should not be used, Although i have seen some pros shoot this way very well it is not a SURPRISE SHOT.  the whole prupose of learning the back tension is to get this surprise and reduce target panic and get better form, turning the release accomplishes none of these things.

 Afetr 2.5 yrs I am still learning my backtension and I hope to have it perfect soon, but the best thing i can suggest is to blank bail, we all hate it and nobody does it enough but it is really the best way to learn the relaese.  When you are sitting on the couch get a shoestring and simulate yourself shooting a backtension using your release and a shoestring during commercials, my coach gave me this same advice and i’ll tell you it is a lot less boring than hours of misguided blank bailing and it i find it works well.

 I hope this information helps people to better understand the advantages of a backtension and its proper use, don’t give up no matter how long it takes because eventually you’ll get it, just keep working at it.

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Published by Jeffress77 on 30 Mar 2008

How did you learn about scrapes? – An informative look into the detail regarding whitetail scrapes –

Growing up as a young hunter at the local shop or the 3D range, I would always hear other hunters chatting about rubs, scrapes, shed antlers, funnels, staging areas, and many other terms used about whitetail hunting in the Midwest.   Did I always know what the old guys were talking about?  That can be answered with a very quick “No.”  Now that whitetail hunting has become a passion and obsession that can only be understood by those men and women who also have my affliction, I can look back into my learning experiences to see exactly how and why I have learned so much.

Unlike many of the fine, budding youth hunters on the planet, I didn’t have a mentor.  My father worked hard to take care of my family.  With a newly handicapped mother, my dad found himself working just as hard at home as he did for a paycheck.  Hunting wasn’t a priority in his life.  My only living grandfather wasn’t healthy enough to take me out to the woods in the winter months.  Shooting sports and hunting, in general, were introduced by my uncle whose own family convictions kept him out of the woods for years upon end.  Hunting had no longer become a priority on his end of the line either. 

Although my first two or three outings into the whitetail woods were nothing to be excited about with single digit temperatures, double digit wind speeds, and heavy snowfall on public ground that hadn’t ever been seen by any of the four eyes of my uncle or myself, I was hooked.  The thought that a majestic creature like a deer may actually be that close to me, was more than I could bear.  I never set eyes on live deer that season, but I had to have more of that feeling.  After that, for years, I was forced to learn on my own.  I made my way into the thick brush and the outskirts of the Indiana croplands as often as I could during the season, paying no attention to wind direction, deer sign, or even getting off of the ground.  

Ten years later, hundreds of deer observed, and tons of blown opportunities behind me, I have developed a better understanding of what it takes to be successful “almost” every time that magical fall season starts approaching.  Continuous scouting for the season may just be the single most important tool in a whitetail hunter’s repertoire. 

When I look back to the days that words like scrapes, rubs, and funnels made as much sense as an Indian restaurant menu, I can laugh a little.  With a little more knowledge into the biology, and sexual tendencies of a whitetail deer, your hunting skills can be honed into what you always wanted them to be.  Trying to figure out why, when and where whitetail bucks and does make scrapes will only help in getting that buck you dream about.

Deer utilize a scrape, which is basically a pawing motion on the ground in conjunction with their scent glands and urinary/solid waste, to create a sexual or territorial marking for communication with other deer.  Deer use mainly five different glands to communicate with the other deer.  The pre-orbital (around the eyes), and tarsal glands (inside the hind legs) are familiar to most hunters, but whitetail bucks and does alike utilize the interdigital glands (between the hoof toes), forehead glands, and metatarsal glands (below the tarsal glands).  These scent glands leave a blueprint, unique to each deer, which may arouse curiosity, stimulation, or anger instincts to other deer in a scrape or on surrounding flora.

In the past 20 or so years creating your own scrape or continuing the curiosity or sexual impulses of an existing scrape has become a valuable addition in the hunter’s bag of tricks.  This is a fairly easy way of patterning deer, not only during the pre-rut, but all season. You can actually treat scrapes all year long during the pre/post rut periods by using “non-sexual” scents. By this I mean non-estrus urines or ammonia-based synthetics that are available on the growing scent market.

Sexual scents are present during stages of the rut, but not as effective any other time of the year. Using estrus urine in June or February is going to confuse the deer and possibly provide a means of avoidance in that area. If you are nearing the rut within two-three weeks (second week in October here in the Midwest), it would help to use a buck urine/dominant buck urine/tarsal gland/doe urine combination.  Providing a pre-orbital scent or an overhanging licking branch positioned lower (for use by does) and possibly one higher (for use by dominant bucks) are necessary additions to a good scrape. The buck urine provides a territorial scent, keeping the other bucks interested in who is visiting the same scrape that he is. The tarsal gland scent is another territorial scrape scent on which bucks will urinate in the scrapes to provide another point of territory and communication.  Female deer also often frequent scrapes to leave their urine, pre-orbital, metatarsal, and interdigital scent also. The licking branches are rubbed, licked, and nibbled to provide pre-orbital and forehead gland scent deposit as well.

During the rut, including the week before and possibly a few weeks after the final stages (of the first rut) is a good time to introduce estrus doe urine into the scrape. This will trigger the highly sexual interests of the bucks. The tarsal/urine buck scents from other deer will also trigger an intense anger towards another deer, possibly having the buck wondering “Who is coming here on my turf? Who is trying to get my females?”

Often, making these scrapes early in the season will allow for the deer to tend to the scrapes themselves. If one or two deer are interested in the scrape early on, they will tend to the scrape and leave their REAL scents in the FAKE scrape. Now your original FAKE scrape has become an ACTIVE scrape, the deer are using it regularly, and you may not need to tend to it again.

Since deer also often defecate in or around their scrapes, one technique that Michigan hunters Greg and Fred Abbas of A-Way Outdoors use with their scrapes is to put droppings from another buck in a different hunting area in their mock scrapes. Fred Abbas harvested a nice buck from a different part of the county, but also harvested his droppings and dirt from the scrapes in that area. Fred utilized the distant buck’s scents to make his own success in another area.

Use trail cameras or other forms of monitoring to observe your scrapes.  See what works and what doesn’t for your area. Try these great scent tactics this year, and make sure you use good scent-free methods of treating/making the scrapes. Use rubber boots, possibly gloves, and stay on the outside of the scrapes and never step too close. Maybe, just maybe, you will be able to baffle a kid at the local shop just I like used to be baffled when the good hunters started talking about their scrape success!

 

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