Archive for the 'Gear' Category

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Published by Ryan Grand Pre on 02 Jan 2011

Late 60s Early 70s Fred Bear Kodiak Special Compound Bow

I have a fred Bear Kodiak Special Compound Bow That was made in Grayling, Michigan late 60s Earliy 70s. Need to know what it is worth?? any idea would help.

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Published by Clean-Shot on 01 Jan 2011

Spot-On (The Ultimate Evolution of Broadheads)

This new line of hunting broadheads from Clean-Shot Archery will be launched at the 2011 ATA Trade Show next week. The Spot-On Laser Broadhead is automatically activated with a simple bow mounted magnet. As soon as you pull back to full draw, the laser turns on and shows you the exact impact point of the arrow. It can be adjusted in elevation (up to 24″ at 30 yards) to allow the end user to fine tune the laser dot placement on the target. The battery is rechargeable with a separate 12 volt charger, and you will get up to 100 (4 second) shots with each charge. Come see us at the ATA show (booth IZ-15) of visit our website at www.clean-shot.com
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Published by ashleylubold on 29 Dec 2010

Doinker 30″ Stabilizer and 8″ Back Bar

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Published by ashleylubold on 29 Dec 2010

Sure-Loc Supreme 10? Sight Bar

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Published by mcwhitefarms on 03 Oct 2010

100 Grain Muzzy’s and 350 CX Aramids

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Published by archerchick on 07 Sep 2010

Allen Sharpshooter – By Cheri Elliott


BOW & ARROW – OCTOBER 1980

BOW TEST: Affordable Compound
ALLEN SHARPSHOOTER – By Cheri Elliott

BEAUTIFUL is not a word one is apt to use in
describing the latest of Allen compound bows, the
Sharpshooter. ln fact, “plain” might be much more
accurate. But this bow was not intended to dazzle us with
its swirls of highly glossed maple or brilliant heat-cured
color, all of which make any bow much more appealing to
the eye, but doubtfully adds anything to bow performance.
The Allen Sharpshooter, as its manufacturers readily
admit, is a utility bow: an inexpensive yet highly functional
compound that offers the archer new to bowhunting the
opportunity to try hunting with a compound at an
affordable price, and still get the performance he requires if
he is to remain in bowhunting. Allen offers the bow as a
possible answer to the great monster: inflation.
Just how good that answer might be and how much
performance the Sharpshooter could provide was a question
we wanted to answer for ourselves, and we eagerly awaited
the arrival of the Sharpshooter at our BOW & ARROW
offices.

First, we would consider physical makeup. Removed
from its packing box, we were immediately aware of two
major characteristics of the Sharpshooter -~ it was a
two-wheeler, and it was light, weighing less than three
pounds total (two pounds fifteen ounces to be exact). lt
was also black, from limb tip to tip, the only color variation
being in the two hanger brackets, cast of lightweight
aluminum, the four silver—colored S-hooks used to attach
the cables and bowstring and the gray cables, themselves.
From the instructions that accompanied the bow, we also
learned that the black textured vinyl finish of the riser
actually covered a wood handle of hard maple; limbs are of
all-glass lamination. It didn’t take but a quick glance to
notice something else about those glass limbs A they were
extremely thin, measuring 5/16—inch deep, l3/16-inch wide.
Available in draw length of 27-29 and 29-31 inches, and in
draw weights of either fifty or sixty pounds, our test bow
arrived at 29-31 inches and fifty pounds. lt also arrived
with a cable guard, included with each Sharpshooter.
Without the guard fletch clearance was non-existent. With it
the clearance was said to measure three-eighths-inch. We
would see, but first we had to mount the cable guard, a
process that required little more than an electric drill and a
screwdriver, plus the understanding of some unique
instructions.

“Measure the vertical distance from your anchor point
to the center of your eye,” the instructions began, going on
to explain that this measurement would serve to position
the cable guard to your specific needs. We would have to
admit to some doubts about the effectiveness of the
system, but were pleasantly surprised to learn less than
fifteen minutes later that the system had worked well,
indeed. We came up with a three-quarter—inch measured
clearance between the shaft and the cables, more than
enough to handle any arrow we might choose to shoot.
Incidentally, Allen has included an integral sight into the
cable guard, allowing for placement of up to four sight pins,
all included in the package, and is a product of S&N
Machine in Sapulpa,Oklahoma.
Also included with the Sharpshooter is a Hoyt Flex—rest.
mounted to the riser before shipping. There was little else
that had to be done to the bow before shooting, other than
the addition of a string nocking point which, again. took
little effort or expense.

We began our actual testing by flinging some arrows at
unmarked distances, looking for flight characteristics more
than anything else. Throughout our testing we would use
the portable forty-eight-inch Promat, a durable yet
convenient target mat that features a woven backstop and
self-sealing screens. During the testing we would also be
using six different shaft materials: Easton’s XX75s, sized
1816; Dougherty Naturals, also made by Easton. but sized
2016; Gordon’s Graphlex, a fiberglass/carbon combination;
the lightweight Lamiglas; the newer Gilmore fiberglass; and
the traditional cedar shafts.
An initial round of two arrows of each type gave
excellent flight with all arrows. but nearly every arrow had
entered the Promat nock-high, lt appeared we’d set my
nocking point too high. A quick adjustment and the
problem was solved.


lt was time to do a little speed testing using a device
known as an Arrometer, manufactured by Micro Motion,
Incorporated. The Arrometer measures speed in feet per
second (fps) and allows for individual length adjustments
for each arrow to within one-tenth inch. We would be
shooting six arrows of each shaft material, half of which
would be fletched with vanes, the other half with feathers.
All feathers and vanes were of the same size and
manufacture to assure comparative consistency.
We began with the Easton 1816 GameGetters, measuring
31.1 inches from knock tip to point. With vanes we reached
speeds of 187.42 fps; with feathers the speed increased to
191.92 fps. For the Dougherty Natural, the speeds were
considerably less, due to the increase in arrow weight
between the two shafts. The average weight for the Easton
had been 426.9 grains; for the Dougherty it averaged
492.87 grains, or about fifteen percent heavier. The
Dougherty Naturals registered an average speed of 177.25
fps when fletched with vanes; 180.33 fps with feathers.
Gordon’s Graphlex arrow is a little lighter than the
Natural, weighing an average 486.27 grains, and thus
showed an increased average speed of 179.25 fps with
vanes, 183.67 with feathers. For the wood arrow speeds
reached 176 fps when vaned; 180.42 with feathers; and for
the heaviest arrow shaft, the Gilmore, speeds registered
168.75 fps with vanes; 172.42 fps with feathers. With vanes
the Gilmores had averaged 542.1 grains, far heavier than
any of the other arrow materials.

The lightweight arrow among the bunch — the Lamiglas
showed the expected greatest arrow speed, reaching
188.5 fps on the average with vanes, 192.0 fps with
feathers. Total speed variations between the slowest and
fastest arrow was but less than 20 fps and, as previously
mentioned, all arrows flew very well, coming as close to our
target destination as we could hope they might.

Because there are as many bowhunters who consider
penetration as the prime capability of a bow as there are
those who swear by speed, we next turned our attention to
penetration abilities of the Sharpshooter. Once again we
used a familiar target: Ethafoam, a two—pound density
polyethylene that is both strong and durable. By combining
four thicknesses of the Ethafoam, each 2% inches thick, we
were able to obtain measurable penetration from each shaft
material without total penetration of any. Those who
bemoaned the speed reading from the Gilmore shaft can
take heart in the comparable penetration capabilities. The
Gilmores penetrated an average of 2.145 inches. In
comparison, the lightweight, faster Lamiglas measured an
average 0.156 inch. Just how these capabilities would
effect actual bowhunting could only be determined by
bowhunting. Unfortunately someone had alerted the only
legal game available, and we could find nothing save a lizard
to shoot toward, and who would eat a lizard?

Consequently, the true test of the Sharpshooter in the
field, against rabbit or deer, will have to wait until another
time. But we’d shot the bow enough to know that it did
shoot well. Speed was sufficient, it was certainly simple to
set-up and shoot, and it was inexpensive. And in today’s
current economic situation, perhaps that is really the name
of the game. <—<<

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Published by archerchick on 06 Sep 2010

How To Build A Bow Weighing Scale – By C.R. Learn


BOW AND ARROW HUNTING – JUNE 1985
HOW TO BUILD A BOW WEIGHING SCALE – By C.R. Learn
An Easy and Inexpensive Gadget to Determine What Your Real Bow Draw Weight Is!

WHAT IS THE REAL draw weight of you
and your friend’s bows? You can find out for a
few dollars and time invested, constructing your own
bow weighing scale. It is a bow weighing system, most
of which can be made from cast-off wood and other
parts.

The first item needed tor making a bow weighing system is a good adjustable scale.
There are many models and types and the costs vary. The scale I finally
bought was a Texas Cotton Scale made by Hanson. I opted tor one that had one-pound graduations up to and including one hundred- sixty pounds. Now not many bowhunters or other archers reach this poundage —- perhaps a few elephant hunters — but most of us are happy with seventy or eighty, tops. Now I never want to even try to
pull a 160-pound bow, but I am interested in crossbows and they even go beyond that
range.

You need a vertical or horizontal support tor the scale. l used a piece of two-by-tour
from the scrap pile — actually, l have no scrap pile. It is a kulch pile and will all be
used someday sooner or later for something such as this— cut six-feet long. The
length will vary with the type bows you will test and the pulley system you use.


The two-by-four looked rather ratty but with the aid of a propane torch to burn off
the old latex paint, and a heavy scrubbing with a wire brush, I ended up with a good
looking piece ot wood that had a raised grain. A few coats of polyurethane gloss
finish and I had a stick that looked good.

There are several ways you can rig your system tor drawing the bows. It you have help
and are a weight lifter, you could probably get by using a single pulley to wrap a line
going from the bowstring to the scale and merely pull the rope to weigh the bow. That
doesn’t work tor me.

One system that works well is a simple boat winch. This has a crank handle and
a winch to wrap a rope or nylon line into. Tie off to the scale and merely crank the
weight up on the bow as it draws on the board. Most of these winches have a ratchet

The hoist was another problem, simply solved. It has two long strands of nylon cord
from top and bottom, These would normally be used to tie oft on a limb and to the
legs of a deer or other game while skinning. l drilled a hole in the upper section of
the board about seven inches from the top. The nylon cord was passed through the hole
and over the top, back around and tied oft behind. This allows the hoist tree movement and maximum length for pulling.

The bottom cords of the hoist were tied off around the top hanger bracket oi the
scale. This allows the scale to be moved up or down with ease. The line slips out of the
pulleys with just the weight of the scale and you stop it where you want. The pulling
line, on one side ot the pulley from the top, was tied off on the side by using a roofing
nail to wrap it around to keep the scale a constant distance from the pipe.
That completes the bow- scale weighing system. l added two pieces of angle
iron to the back, one on the board. A section of oak was cut to give me clearance between the board and clamp the other piece of iron into the vise. I now have a solid, vertical support for my weighing system.

To operate, all you need do is to position a bow on the bottom pipe section so it rests
on the grip area. Most bows today have the pistol grip style and the groove at that
point tits nicely on the covered pipe. Pull the bowstring up and over the hook at the
bottom of the scale. You may have to put a bit of tension on the scale by pulling the draw
cord to center the bowstring on the scale hook.

Pull on the lifting cord of the hoist, and the bowstring moves up the board as the
scale shows the weight ofthe bow. If you follow the AMO specifications, you can
measure from the pivot point of the grip area (the point where the grip is positioned
on the pipe) and you will have the draw weight at different draw lengths.

You will find some variations between what other bowhunters tell you they are
shooting at for draw weight and what they actually shoot. I first built a unit like this
many years ago and once took it to a shoot. Most bowhunters were happy to weigh
their bows to see what they were actually pulling. Some of the “big guys” wouldn’t
come near me. We sneaked a heavy bow while one character was sidetracked and
found he wasn’t shooting eighty pounds at all; only fifty-five!

This bow weighing system won’t cost you much cash. The wood and pipe we all
have laying around or know someone who does, so that cost is nothing. The Cotton
Scale will run about twenty dollars, give or take a few bucks, and is offered by
many dealers or in catalogs.

This scale can be calibrated with a set screw so you can get accurate readings.
The hoist system can be found in many sporting goods stores, Better yet, browse
through garage sales and swap meets until you find a hoist or winch that will cost
you almost nothing. <—-<<<

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Published by admin on 23 Aug 2010

BloodBrothers Or Adversaries-Choices

BloodBrothers Or Adversaries-Choices by Ted Nugent

There is no question that the finest human beings on planet earth are found around hunting campfires worldwide. Kind, hard working, caring, giving, generous, connected, down to earth, clever, sophisticated, educated, loving, funny and genuine are only a few adjectives to describe the families who carry on the most positive environmental, hands-on conservation lifestyle in the world. These are my heart and soul BloodBrothers and they inspire me to no end.

I have been guiding, outfitting, hunting along side and sharing BloodBrother campfires with literally thousands and thousands of these great people for my entire life and I know what I am talking about. The defining example of their greatness continues to sine through when I proudly take part in numerous charity fundraisers for needy children and the hero warriors of the US Military and their families year after year, month after month. Never has there been a time when hunters fail to charge forward, often at great personal sacrifice, to give and give and give some more. In nearly every instance in literally hundreds of instances, my donated hunts have raised record dollars fo every imaginable charity event, and that is because hunters always give more. Know it.

With that glowing truism well established, it is with a heavy heart that we must admit the painful reality that along with the abundant good, there is unfortunately always some bad and ugly. And no where in any segment of society have I witnessed a lower form of life than that which also inhabits our beloved hunting community. Sad but true.

We all know of their ugly existence. The sign shooters, the treestand thieves, the vandals, the drunks, the slobs, the dopers, the meth heads, the poachers, the criminal element, and maybe even worse than all that, the cannibalistic holy-than-thou elitists who stand as buffoonish deterrents to the recruitment of new and more sporting families to our beloved hunting lifestyle.

This inbreeding and cannibalism within our sport is one of life’s truly bizarre mysteries, and the manifestation of the soullessness of mankind.

You know them too. The unsophisticated amongst us who condemn hunting methodology choices other than theirs. The black powder elitists who frown on inline muzzleloaders or those unethical lesser sporters who cheat by using scopes on their front stuffers.

The weirdo’s who scorn the compound bowhunter for his “training wheels”.

The state bowhunting organizations who somehow classify a crossbow as some sort of firearm or possessing firearm capabilities in spite of the universal evidence to the contrary.

The “fair chase” and “no fences” obsessers who condemn private property high fence game managers’ and other hunters’ choices.

The goofballs who condemn the use of bait for herbivores but hunt over various baits themselves, and use bait for bears.

There are hunters who have voted to outlaw hound hunting.

How about the really strange hunters who think wearing camo in public has some negative connotations to the non hunter?

If you can imagine, in the eleven states where Sunday hunting is banned, the loudest voice for such an unimaginable hunting ban comes from hunter organizations. Think about that for a moment. Incredible.

I have personally been attacked forever for my legal hunting choices, choices mind you that are chosen by millions upon millions of great hunters across the land. Many of the world’s greatest and most respected hunters ever, like Fred Bear, Dale Earnhart, Howard Hill, Craig Boddington, Bob Foulkrod, Fred Eichler, Chuck Adams, Cameron Haines, Michael Waddell and millions more enjoy hunting with hounds and over bait. How a fellow hunter can condemn such choices is a clear and present indictment to their embarrassing small mindedness and strange, unfounded elitism. Sad testimony really.

My personal favorites are the clowns who claim I’m not a real hunter and bad for our sport because of my long hair and musical career, then go off with their drinking, smoking, chewing buddies to the topless bar for a night of wholesome recreation. Phenomenal. Meanwhile I will continue to celebrate and promote our honorable hunting heritage in my proven style and to hundreds of millions of people around the world in my unprecedented and irrefutably effective way. I wonder how many of them created a children’s charity to recruit tens of thousands of new sporters. I don’t really wonder. I know.

Bottomline, the animal right’s and anti-hunting goons have never negatively effected our sport anywhere near as bad as our own fellow hunters have. When Michigan produces more than a thousand times the number of mourning doves than we do peasants, but have failed to legalize dove hunting, it is not the anti-hunters who are to blame. It is the bottom feeding hunters who sided with them or failed to stand up for our rights that accomplished this grave injustice, and many, many others across America just like it.

So what can the good guys do? Turn up the heat, that’s what. Engage all hunters to think and try harder to be a positive force for our sport. Initiate the dialog and don’t let the naysayers get away with nonsense and silliness. We can’t educate those entrenched to resist education, but I believe we can galvanize more and more hunters to be supportive of choices and respect the powerful bond of our BloodBrotherhood.

Sometimes you can’t fix stupid, but we can all try harder to maximize the positive and minimize the negative. I for one would never find fault with, much less attempt to ban the choices of my fellow sporters. Waterholes are bait. Foodplots are bait. Mock scrapes are bait. Etc etc etc. We all know that. And every hunter I know supports such choices completely. Let us hope a new wave of upgrade rolls throughout our sport so that someday we can all stand as one to further our beloved lifestyle while uniting to defeat the real braindead enemy of those opposed to us. I have a dream.

Visit tednugent.com of twiter.com/tednugent for more Full Bluntal Nugity

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Published by admin on 02 Aug 2010

SUMMER SAUSAGE by Ted Nugent

 

SUMMER SAUSAGE                                                           by Ted Nugent
 
 

Ah, summertime, life is good and the living is easy. Dripping wet with nonstop sweat, but I’ll take it. The heat and humidity was brutal, but I had a day off from an even more brutal rock-n-roll tour schedule where we stormtrooped six nights a week with an animal ferocity the likes of which mankind has never imagined.
Trample The Weak Hurdle The Dead, nothing but lovesongs from your uncle Ted. Me and my boys were rocking at an alltime high intensity, and we only had eight more weeks to go before the official hunting season came on strong. I couldn’t wait. In fact, I won’t!
 
Spending my days working with my Labrador retrievers in anticipation of another upcoming wonderful waterfowl season, checking my varmint traps, exercising my arsenal and working on feeders and deer stands, there was no way I could fail to sit in one of my favorite ladderstands at the forest pond where the critters would surely have to converge for a little liquid refreshment before dark. There are swine in these here woods, and I need to get me some pork for the grill.
 
Big Jim and I loaded up the F250 backstrap hauler with bows, arrows, lightweight ScentLok camo, ice cold water, ThermaCells, vidcam and plenty of attitude. We quietly settled into our double ladderstands with a good cross wind from the southwest, and got ready to rock the three hours till dark.
 
I had placed some brand new Primo’s Swamp Donkey nutritional supplemental feed and attractant, both in granulated and palletized form, at the base of a few trees between us and the ponds edge. Following recent good rains, the little woodland pond doubled in size from slightly less than an acre to two acres, so we knew we needed something to improve our chances to lure some hogs into bowrange.
 
I often mention how the great outdoors “cleanses the soul”, but during my insane ultra rock tours, soul cleansing is essential for survival. As always, the beautiful Michigan woods calmed me and brought relaxation like no other. Crows yammered in the distance, woodpeckers harassed the wood bound bug world, and sand hill cranes crillled high overhead.
 
My old woods is emerald green in summer, and a slight breeze under the sun shielding canopy provided a welcome respite from the cooking ball of fire to the west. Jim videoed the beauty of sunrays cutting through the swaying  branches and a smiling old guitar player at home and happy on his sacred hunting grounds. A few golden deer skittered off in the shadows, but all was peaceful at our waterhole.
 
As dusk approached, I noticed movement to the south as three very handsome wild boar skulked along the forest edge headed for water. The good sized pigs took their time but eventually waded into the pond, crossing to our side. When they got a snout full of Swamp Donkey, they went for it.
 
As always, they ate facing us or facing directly away, not giving a decent shot for a long time. Finally, the smaller, redder hog, what I thought was a sow, turned broadside and I smoothly drew my lightweight 50# Martin bow without any of them noticing.
 
At twenty yards, I picked a spot and let er rip. The vidcam caught the zebra shaft smacking into the hogs ribs as the Lumenok glowed bright orange right exactly where I wanted it, in and out of the swine in an instant.
 
With a grunt and a squeal, the trio lit out of there like a punched piggy and disappeared into the dark forest behind us. Good Lord that’s exciting stuff! At 62 years clean and sober young, every arrow is more thrilling today in my life than ever before, and my big old pig killing grin on camera said it all. I knew my arrow was true, and it was just a matter of tracking my prize.
 
The bloodtrail was a dandy and in short order we recovered my prize. Though I thought my pig was the smallest of the three, it turned out to be a fine, heavy boar of over 140 pounds. A great trophy and killer grilling!
 
My 400 grain Nuge Gold Tip 5575 tipped with a scalpel sharp Magnus two blade BuzzCut head had zipped clean through the tough beast like butter. A graceful 50# bow is all she wrote, and in fact, Mrs. Nugent cleanly kills all her big game with a lightweight girly 40#. She has bagged big tenacious deer, rams, wildebeest, kudu, gemsbok, zebra, warthogs, impala, Aoudad, and an assortment of various big game around the world, proving the certain deadliness of lightweight tackle. I hope nobody keeps people out of our wonderful bowhunting lifestyle for the wrongheaded assumption that a powerful bow is necessary to kill big game. It isn’t. Stealth, grace and razor sharp arrowhead placement makes venison, not velocity or power.
 
We hauled my trophy boar out of the forest with a handy Glenn’s DeerHandle, loaded it up and after thoroughly cleaning and skinning it, hung it in our portable Polar King walk in cooler. The next day our buddy who specializes in smoking whole hogs picked it up for the final process for the ultimate wise use conservation of renewable pork.
 
Summertime-perfect. Hog hunting-perfect. Beautiful arrows-perfect. Dead hogs-perfect. Smoked hogs-perfect. Barbeque-perfect. Rocking like pork spirit powered maniacs the next night in Wisconsin-perfect. I call it the American Dream. Perfect.
 
For ultimate year round trophy boar hunting with Ted Nugent at Sunrize Acres in Michigan, contact Paul@tednugent.com 517-750-9060, or visit tednugent.com
 

 

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Published by HeadsOrTails on 11 Jun 2010

Bow Press Last Chance Archery

Slightly used like new, 6 months old
EBAY sells for 730 plus shipping

The EZ Press (electric) is designed for quick and easy set-up of all compound bows.
The EZ Press components are machined for smooth and easy operation.
The EZ Press is what you need for higher draw weight bows.
Comes with standard bench of wall mount.

Asking $625
443-244-5440 Tim

 

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