Archive for the 'Gear' Category

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Published by admin on 18 Jan 2010

My beat up leather tab…Frank Addington Jr.

My beat up leather tab…

 

One frequent question from traditional archers is what type of finger protection do I prefer when shooting.  I have always said that instinctive shooting is mostly personal preference and you should shoot what allows you to shoot best.  If you are comfortable and can shoot accurately that’s the answer. 
 
When I was a kid I preferred a Bear glove.  The package had Fred’s photo on it and I knew he wore a glove so that’s what I wanted to wear.  I would wear a new glove around for days trying to soften it up and get it broken in.  I still have my first Bear glove.  Those were happy days.  I’d spend hours in the back yard shooting pretending to be Fred Bear on some remote adventure.  I always told Fred he’d made me a better shooter and those big shoulder’s of Fred’s would rock with laughter.
 
I tried some tabs along the way and eventually went to bare fingers.  I shot this way for several years and built my fingers up.  I tended to drag my third finger so it usually had more calluses than the others.  However, one time around 1990 the late Rev. Stacy Groscup and I shared a stage together performing at a local sports show.  There was a stage but no chairs so the audience would stand at the stage.  After about eight rows back people couldn’t see so Stacy and I would do a show, let that eight rows leave and then we’d immediately do another show.  I think we ended up doing more than 20 shows that weekend and my fingers were throbbing so much that they hurt when they touched the sheets at night.  So the last day of the show Stacy handed me a special hand made leather tab he made.  I used it that day and had great results with it, even with my sore fingers. 
 
I gave his tab back and he told me he would make some tabs especially for me.  I forgot about it until a few weeks later a package arrived.  It was full of leather tabs, mostly brown leather but a few were out of different materials.  I picked one and noticed Stacy had signed the back of it.  That was 1990.  Now, 20 years later, I use that same tab today.  I have never had to use one of the back up tabs.  I am still using the original tab.
 
It’s made out of flat leather and I carry it in my wallet.  I always have it with me.  The last thing I do before heading on stage is take out my wallet and place the tab on my right hand.  It’s a quiet reminder of Stacy and a tradition that I’ve stuck with all these years.  I say a quick prayer and then head on stage. 
 
What type of finger protection do you prefer? 
 
Wearing a tab helps me get away from dragging my third finger so much.  I feel I get a cleaner release with the tab.  I also like the fact that I can always have it with me, even if I don’t have my bow and someone wants to shoot I am ready.  I like the tradition and feel of a leather glove but feel I am just a little more accurate with my Groscup tab.  I have several in my desk drawer at home.  I told someone this supply should get me through the rest of my archery career and still have some left over to pass along to my son Gus.
 
In closing, my best advice is to shoot what allows you to shoot best.  We want you enjoying archery and hitting what you shoot at.  That’s the name of the game.

Thanks for reading.  Until next time, Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.
The Aspirin Buster
 
www.frankaddingtonjr.com

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Published by KurtD on 14 Jan 2010

DO NOT POST ITEMS FOR SALE IN THIS SECTIONS (Blogs and Articles)!

This section of Archerytalk is just for Blogs and Articles.

Please use the Archerytalk Forums TO POST A FREE CLASSIFIED AD

Thanks,

admin

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Published by tw10136 on 07 Jan 2010

mission bows?

how are the new mission bows made by matthews?

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Published by justsayitsigns on 29 Dec 2009

looking for mod.for 26-27 in draw length

i got a used bow for christmas. it is a pro line dual cam wit 29 in draw. i need to find 2 matching mod to reduce the draw to 26 or 27. i can’t find any real in fo out there for pro line. i think it is a carbon pro line! please any suggestions or links would be greatly appreciated.

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Published by admin on 22 Dec 2009

Dip Your Own Arrows By Steven Barde

Dip Your Own Arrows
It’s Only Minor Trouble And Your Shafts Can Carry
Your Favorite Colors!
By Steven Barde

http://www.bowandarrowhunting.com/

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 Dipping Arrows is one way to add color to the shaft, make it more individual and in hunting, easier to find.  There are several ways of adding color.  Some spray the shaft, which can be messy, some prefer to paint it on but the easiest and perhaps the best method is to dip the shaft full length in a tube.  The dipping insures a complete coating, smoothly applied, while the end result is even and has no runs or blemishes if done properly.

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 Any lacquer designed for wood will work well.  Some automotive lacquers can be used but many of these have a different base and it may be hard to find a thinner that works.  If the lacquer and thinner won’t work together, you will get blisters, and in some cases, the lacquer won’t adhere to the wood but will run or peel off.  If you plan to use a lacquer you’re not sure of, try a small amount and use some parts of a shaft for testing.  Some combinations will work even against the rules but it is best to test first.  The wood lacquers and thinners are easily obtainable.

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 If you buy one pint  of lacquer, get at least one quart of thinner, since the solution used for dipping is thinned a great deal.  If you plan to do quite a bit of dipping, add to your list of purchases some retarder, to prevent the thinned lacquer from drying too fast on the shaft causing runs and blobs, and a silicone additive.  The silicone gives the lacquer mixture a high glossy finish and makes the lacquer flow smoothly during dipping.

 Mix the lacquer  and thinner to the ratio you desire.  Most use a mixture of two parts thinner to one part lacquer.  Add one eighth part retarder, if you plan to use it, and a few drops of silicone additive.  A little of the silicone does an excellent job.  Some archers prefer to use a thinner solution and mix three or four parts thinner to one part lacquer.  The thinner the solution, the more dipping is required to get a good high gloss finish.  Put the solution into a bottle that can be tightly capped and shake well.

 If you haven’t tried dipping before, the two parts thinner to one part lacquer works well and requires less dipping.  The more dipping and polishing that is done, the higher the gloss on the finished arrow.  You also will need your dip tube, (see Nov.-Dec. 65 issue), some 0000 steel wool to take the hair grain of the shaft, and a rag.  Stretch a line from two supports, preferably a line with a twist, to hand the shafts on while drying.  Some archers use household clothes pins, some use electrical alligator clips but carpet tacks have proven best for many archers to hold the shafts to the line while they dry.

 When selecting your arrows for dipping, the edge of the grain, which is the side with the finest lines in it, should face the side of the bow, since the edge grained side of the shaft is the strongest part.  If you don’t have a method to mark this grain side, it is hard to find after the shaft has been dipped.

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 By using carpet tacks, you can put the tack in the grain side of the shaft and the little hole left is easily found when it comes time to nock the dipped arrow.  The line or raised edge of the speed nock goes in line with the hole left by the carpet tack.  One other advantage of the tack is that there is less handling of the dipped shaft.  When using the alligator clip, the clip is just hung over the edge of the line, the same as the carpet tack.

 When you use the clothes pin, it is necessary to dip the shaft with the fingers and hold while attaching the shaft to the jaws of the clothes pin.  In this step, you will get covered with lacquer if you dip too high on the shaft.  These are a few of the ways to hand the shafts to dry but the final choice will be the one that works best for you.

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 Select the shafts you intend to dip and lay them in place.  Take a damp rag and wipe each shaft.  This will dampen the wood and raise the hair grain.  Cut the nock taper on both ends of the shaft prior to wiping.  The reason for cutting the nock taper is that it allows the lacquer to drip from the end rapidly, and when the nock is applied to the dipped shaft, there is no holiday of bare wood where the nock taper has missed the edge of the nock.

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 After wiping, allow the shafts to dry about thirty minutes.  When they are dry, apply the carpet tack or other holding device and dip the arrow in the tube, pushing it to within an inch or less of the top of the shaft, but slowly.  A line attached above the dip tube will let the drops from the dripping shaft fall into the tube instead of on the ground or mat.  When the drops have almost stopped, place the dipped shaft on the drying line and proceed with the next shaft, and so on, until all shafts have been dipped once.  Allow the dipped shaft to dry at least two hours.  The drying time will vary with humidity and temperature.

 Remove the dry shafts from the line, take a piece of your steel wool and rub each shaft to remove the hair grain that was brought up by the damp rag and lacquer.  After steel wooling each shaft, wipe them with a dry rag to remove the steel particles and dust, revers ends and dip again.  Apply the tack or other holding device, dip, drain and hang to dry.  For most hunting shafts, two dips will be enough with a two part thinner and one-part lacquer solution.  Allow to dry for another two hours.  If the color is still too light, steel wool, wipe down, reverse ends and dip them again.

 Some colors cover better than others and some lacquers are thicket than others.  The best thickness of the mixture is determined after you try a few shafts.  If the lacquer runs too slowly and causes runs down the side of the shaft, it is too thick and needs more thinner.  If the lacquer is too thin, it will run rapidly.  If you like to use a thin solution, it will work but will require more dipping to get the desired finish.  The solution that works well in dry Arizona will not work the same in humid Florida, sot he proper mixture must be determined by the number of dips required to give you the best color and finish for the climate you live in.

 After the shaft has been dipped  and you have the desired color and finish, remove the tack and lightly steel wool the finished shaft to remove any roughness, place the shaft in your arrow rack and you are then ready to nock the shaft and fletch.

 The nock should go with the speed nock ridge in line with the edge of the grain of the shaft so the arrow will have the strongest part of the wood bearing against the side of the bow.  The edge may be determined by the previous use of the carpet tack or by cutting the opposite end.

 Remember the best solution is one that gives you the best results.  If you want to experiment with different colors and lacquers, try them, but be sure the lacquer and thinner mix together and do not form bubbles or blotches.

 Recently I decided to try a new color for hunting.  I wanted a bright orange, almost international orange, but couldn’t find it anywhere.  I went to a paint store and after checking the lacquer, added some bright orange from one of the new color mixing machines and shook it up.  When this lacquer and thinner were poured into solution, I didn’t know what to expect so I tried a few shafts.  The dealer said the color mix would work with anything but I was doubtful.

 These shafts came out beautiful!  They are a brilliant orange, the color I wanted, and there were no runs o blotches to mar the finish.  These shafts have been easy to find and have stood up well with rough use.

 If you decide to experiment like this, go ahead, but try a few shafts first before gambling all your undipped shafts.  A garage or any open place where the dust and dirt can’t bother the wet shafts will work well.  Dipping is fun, inexpensive and the colors and results are left only to your imagination.

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Published by admin on 16 Dec 2009

Archers of Antiquity By Col. Robert H. Rankin

Archers of Antiquity
This Bow Has Been Under Development For Some Six Thousand Years,
And The End Is Not Yet In Sight!
By Col. Robert H. Rankin

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 Although the bow is one of the oldest of all martial weapons, we are fortunate in that we do have some idea of what even the earliest bows were like.  We are fairly certain that bows were being used in warfare as far back as 400 B.C.!  Pictures of these bows and those of later eras are to be found in bas reliefs, carvings and paintings in Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine and other sections of the Middle East.

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 Yet there is some doubt as to just where the bow originated.  Some military historians believe that the Semetic peoples, who thousands of years ago come out of the Arabian desert and spread throughout the Middle East and along the north coast of Africa, invented the bow.

 Incidentally, the bow is of particular interest to military historians inasmuch as its introduction made possible for the first time the tactical element of surprise, as well as attack from beyond range and from behind cover.  In addition, it greatly reduced the possibility of retaliation.  All of these are important military considerations in any age.  In fact, the bow was directly responsible for the introduction of armor and it was one of the few weapons actually to revolutionize warfare, itself.

 The simple bow was, of course, the first type to be introduced.  It appeared as early as 4000 B.C., possibly earlier.  The earliest representation of the composite bow is to be found on a 2000 B.C. Bas relief commemorating an Accadian (Babylonian) victory over the Summerians.

 In discussing composite bows of any era, it is interesting to note the words of an Arab writer of the fifteenth century, A.D., who wrote:

 “The structure of the composite bow is not unlike that of man.  The human body is made up of four basic elements- bones, flesh, arteries and blood.  The composite bow has the same four counterpart elements: Wood – its skeleton; horn -its flesh; tendons – its arteries; glue – its blood.  Man has back and belly.  So has the bow.  And just as man can bend forward but is likely to damage himself by bending too far backward, so with the operation of the bow.”

 Composite bows were, of course, complicated and difficult to make, so their manufacture and use was restricted to the more civilized peoples of ancient times.

 From evidence which comes down to us through the centuries, we know that the bows were not braced until just before use.  To brace the bow, the string was fastened by means of a loop to one end of the bow.  This end then was placed on the ground and the bow was bent by arm until it was possible to attach the loop on the other end.  Several interesting pictures of this operation exist.

 Bows were used both in open battle and in the attack and defense of fortified positions.  The war chariot, introduced sometime around 200 B.C. By either the Hurians or the Hitties, was used principally as a mobile fore platform for archers.  Chariot bowmen usually carried a quiver at their side suspended from a strap which passed over the shoulder.  In addition, one and sometimes two additional quivers were attached to the side of the chariot within easy reach of the archer.  Mounted archers carried the quiver at the side or on the back, as did the foot archers.  As an exception, some early Egyptian paintings show dismounting archers with bundles of arrows at their feet.

 From the number of bas reliefs, paintings, et cetera, which have been preserved for thousands of years, showing archery practice, it appears that great importance was attached to archery training.  Apparently the novice had to develop basic skills with the simple bow after which he progressed of the composite bow. 

 Quivers usually were made of leather, metal, wood or of a combination of these.  Assyrian quivers were unique in that they had a fringe – covered opening to prevent arrows from jostling out.

 Although most composite bows were of the conventional pattern, triangular composite bows also were used, the arms forming a 120 degree angle.  Many of the painting of the time of Rameses III of Egypt (1192-160 B.C.) show these triangular bows in use.  Just how such bows compare with the conventional pattern is not known, although it would seem that from their basic design they would not be as efficient.

 Sometime during the 800’s B.C., the ends of the bow were turned back in a so-called duck’s head pattern.  This served both as an ornament and as a means of making the ends of the bow string more secure.

 The ancient archers of the Middle East used what would later be called the “Mediterranean Release.”  The tips of the first two fingers were used to draw the string back and the arrow was held between these two fingers.  The string was drawn back to the point of the shoulder, with the bow held at arm’s length in front of the body.

 Although the early Greeks used the bow extensively, it was practically discarded later, the Greek warriors apparently preferring close combat tactics.  The Romans did not regard the bow with favor.  They placed reliance on various forms of the javelin and their wicked short double-edge sword.  Interestingly enough, however, the Athenians developed a highly efficient body of naval bowmen.  During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.), these specialists were used with great success against the Spartans.

 From the early beginnings noted above, the bow would continue, in one form or another, to be a decisive weapon in warfare for many centuries to come.

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Published by Jessehoyt on 10 Dec 2009

Sure loc scope for SALE!!!

Selling a Black eagle 45mm scope with 4 power lens along with the challenger sight. It also has the cleaning kit and light kit with a .10 fiber and a case along with the scope cover. asking $500 or best offer. If you have any questions Call Jesse at 615-336-3504

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Published by hishuntinchic84 on 29 Nov 2009

Anyone in need of a pse compound bow for their lady or child for christmas?

Hey i am from Tennessee and am trying to sell my brand new pse chaos bow …i would love to keep it but i just cant find the time between work and school to go hunting …an associate at Gander mtn. told me to check out this site and post it on here …if your interested post something back …it would make an awesome christmas gift and its brand new barely used never been shot at any animal ..only target shot a few dozen times.

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Published by casemaniam on 09 Oct 2009

Need a super case for your Next hunting trip?

We have them. Let us become your #1 Case dealer.
www.excellentcases.com

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Published by nickoutdoor on 18 Sep 2009

New Wrist Bow Slings

Wrist Wraps Bow Slings are the MOST COMFORTABLE and EASILY ADJUSTABLE SLINGS available. Made in the USA out of water resistent neoprene. 6 unique styles and 3 BowTech, 1 Diamond, and an Alpine archery design.   Check them out at www.outdoorprostaff.com Bowtech Slings

 

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