Archive for the 'General Archery' Category

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Published by archerchick on 09 Feb 2011

The Buck And The 120-Pound Longbow~ By Richard Palmer


BOW AND ARROW
August 1981

The Buck And The 120 Pound Longbow ~ By Richard Palmer

DUSK WAS fast settling in, as I stood perched on a limb, fifteen
feet off the ground. My eyes strained the dim light looking for the movement
of big game. Suddenly, like a wrath from the mist, an approaching deer.

Moving farther out on the limb, I got in position to shoot. I could barely
see the spikes the deer carried. The buck drew closer and stopped broadside
about fifteen yards away. With a mighty surge of muscle, my shoulder
pulled back the 120-pound longbow. My string fingers touched the corner
of my mouth, releasing death and destruction, as the mighty longbow lunged forward.

I have been involved in archery since the age of 4, and have been an
avid bowhunter since the inception of legalized bowhunting in my home
state of New York and neighboring Pennsylvania. For fifteen years I competed
in archery tournaments, retiring when the era of gadgetry came into
being. I shoot a 120-pound longbow of my own design and manufacture. I
use this heavy bow for hunting, as well as in my practice sessions. I use heavy
three-eighths-inch shafts tipped with 160-grain two-blade broadheads when
hunting. This combination will penetrate even the heavy bones of a whitetail deer.

To date, close to thirty deer have bitten the dust.
Halloween dawned bright and sunny, the traditional day when witches and
goblins and wily critters roam. I’d been bowhunting steady for two weeks,
and hadn’t seen hide nor hair of a buck. There were plenty of does around, but
I was holding out for one of those horned critters.
My hunting territory for deer is located about fifteen minutes drive from
where I live in Elmira, New York. The land belongs to Mount Saviour Monastery, where live
a small group of brothers dedicated to a religious life of self-sufficiency. They allow public hunting
by permit only and charge a small nominal fee. Of the many areas in New
York state I’ve hunted, this has to be the most productive for deer. Over the
years I’ve bowhunted there, I’ve managed to garner eleven of the wily creatures.

The monastery property comprises over a thousand
acres of rolling cultivated fields and timbered off woods;
just the type of terrain in which the elusive whitetail flourish.
The deer sometimes are so thick that the monastery
will return part of the permit fee if a bowhunter takes a deer.
The reason is that the deer get into the cornfields,
reducing the corn production considerably. The brothers use
the field crop to make silage to feed their milk cows.
one of their few sources of income. So you can understand
their anguish, when they find thirty or forty deer in their
cornfields every evening. From talking to Brother Bruno,
who issues the permits, I understand that they sometimes
help in doing the driving for the gun hunters who come up later in the season.

When purchasing a permit to hunt on their property, a map
and instructions are issued. The detailed map shows
property boundaries and terrain features. Areas of no
hunting are written in, so there can be no error on the part of
the hunter, as to where he can and cannot hunt. Portable
tree stands are preferred, as they cultivate their woods for timber.

I managed to leave work early and get over to my brother, Ken’s, house, a
few minutes past four in the afternoon. He was there already, having just arrived
home from work himself. We left for the monastery a few minutes later,
full of expectation. It was a beautiful fall day, with the sun shining and the leaves in all their
varied colors; the kind of day that makes you want to be in the woods.
While enroute, we discussed what area we would be hunting that afternoon.

Upon arrival, we each headed for our own preselected spot. Ken headed for
an old logging road in an area the deer cross frequently, on their way to a
large lush green field. I headed for a large shaggy bark tree, located in a
small clearing. This tree has a deer run on each side and is used primarily late
in the afternoon. During the day, the deer bed down in a deep gorge nearby.
Toward evening, they head uphill using the runs in the area of my tree,
as they head toward their various feeding areas.

I already had seen does come by on the different afternoons I had sat in
this tree, but I had resisted the temptation to shoot one, waiting instead for
a buck. Over two weeks had gone by and I decided that this afternoon I
would take what came: buck or doe. It was peaceful sitting in this big
old tree, contemplating thoughts serene. Occasionally looking up at the
sky, I’d count the numerous vapor trails left by the big jets on their way
to strange places. I thought to myself, what a life this is, to be able to go out
on a fabulous day like this and commune with nature.

During my reverie, I would look around occasionally. Sometimes I
found even this too much effort, as the sun and warm day tended to make me
feel lazy. A day like this should be enjoyed to its fullest. Looking to my left,
I suddenly was awakened from my lethargy. Standing broadside about
fifteen yards away, was a large doe. Slowly I got up from my comfortable
resting position and carefully inched out on to a large limb. I had my bow
in hand, nocked with a 700-grain wooden arrow, tipped with a Hill broadhead.

Moving carefully into shooting position, I started my draw. The upper
limb of my longbow hit a branch that I hadn’t noticed, so I moved farther
out on the precarious limb. I looked down and noticed I was quite a way off
the ground. I really wasn’t aware of the height, though, concentrating only on
the deer. Starting my draw again, I caught something on the bottom limb this
time and, in trying to carefully extricate the situation, I made some noise
that caught the standing doe’s attention. She looked up casually at first
and as I got the lower limb free, I caught the upper limb on the loose dry
bark of the tree. Exasperated, I tore the upper limb free; anything to get
the shot, but this was too much for the doe. and with a bound, she was into
the safety of the pines.

I couldn’t believe it. After two weeks of continuous
hunting, a perfect opportunity presents itself and I
blow it. I was standing there on the tree stand, mumbling
to myself, when I noticed brown movement coming
down the same trail the doe had used. As the deer
drew closer, I could see horns.
Moving farther out on the limb, I knew what it’s like
to be a tightrope walker. The limb I stood on was only
about six inches in diameter and here I was shooting
a 120-pound longbow that’s heavy enough to down an
elephant and takes two average men and a boy to pull.
What if in pulling the heavy bow I lost my balance and fell?

These thoughts were running through my mind. as the deer approached.
The buck drew broadside to me and stopped only fifteen yards away, about
where the doe had stood. All thoughts of falling from the tree vanished from
my mind. replaced by a dream state, as I saw the buck standing there. Perched
on that limb high off the ground, suddenly cool and methodical, my only
feeling was one of intense concentration as I prepared to make my shot.
With a smooth yet powerful pull the heavy longbow came back and my
fingers released the shaft. The heavy three-eighths-inch arrow hit the buck
in back of the left shoulder just below the center line, completely penetrating
the deer. The buck bounded away into the safety of the pines, only about fifty
feet away.

I gathered my gear from the tree and climbed down. Walking over to where I
had hit the buck, I found my arrow lying on the ground. It was saturated
from end to end with blood. I knew I had made a liver hit, which is always
fatal. Having shot close to thirty deer over the years, many of them with this same
identical hit, I knew my deer would be only a short distance away. Here’s
where experience comes into the picture. Hitting the deer is the easy part; finding
them is another story. I learned long ago that if the shot is good, the
search should be short and easy. Score a poor hit and you’ll be on your hands
and knees all night long looking for blood.

In addition to big game hunting, I enjoy hunting squirrel and pheasant with
the longbow. I have managed to shoot these difficult game species using only
the bow and arrow. Using heavy blunts, I am able to knock pheasants out of
the air. In 1978 I competed in the World’s Flight Championships held at the salt
flats in Wendover, Utah. Shooting a 133- pound flight bow, I came in second in
the professional class with a shot of 890 yards, one foot, one inch. Again in
1979, using a heavier flight bow of 145 pounds, I managed to garner a second
place.

I have been training to break the bow pull record and hope to make an attempt
sometime in 1981. My training includes pulling on heavy bows up to 220 pounds
in weight. This tied in with weight training, has made me, I believe, one of the
strongest archers in the world. I met my brother at the car, and told
him I had made a good hit on a buck, showing him the bloody arrow.
“I figure the buck will be lying some-where in the pines, not far from where
I hit him,” I said.

We stowed our hunting gear and got out the searching and deer cleaning
equipment. We usually take everything so we don’t have to bother coming
back for something we might need. This usually consists of lights, toilet
paper, a sharp knife, small saw, drag rope, a plastic bag (for heart and liver),
and a pencil and string for filling out and attaching the deer tag to the carcass.
By this time, dusk was well on its way, so we turned our lights on and returned
to my tree. I had marked the spot where I had found the arrow, with a piece of
toilet paper. So it was only a matter of minutes to line out the direction the deer
had headed. We then walked into the pines and started looking for
blood. Side by side, we moved forward slowly, scanning to the front and both
sides. I had just moved to my left, when my brother yelled out, “There he is up
ahead. Moving to where I could see, the spike buck was lying on the pine needles.
He appeared to be peacefully asleep, but I knew it was forever. He had traveled
only about a hundred feet before expiring.

I gutted out the deer, placing the heart and liver in the plastic bag I had brought.
With the small saw, I cut through the pelvic bone to better open up the lower
cavity and allow it to air out. After we had drained the carcass and I had cleaned
my hands and cutting equipment, we started dragging deer back into the car.

Driving home with a deer always gives me a certain feeling of elation
that only a successful hunt can <—<<<

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www.Archerytalk.com
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Published by jodimark on 26 Jan 2011

janesville bowmen, beginners archery class

the janesville bowmen archery club in janesville wisconsin, is hosting beginners archry classes now through march, ages 8 to adult my come out and learn the safe and proper method to shoot a bow. we will supply all the equipment you will need to learn its fun for the whole family, men, women, boys and girls. to reserve your time slot call 608-774-7265.

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Published by NYI1927 on 18 Jan 2011

CBC 2011 Sportsmen’s Banquet

I wanted to let people in North Eastern Indiana know about a fantastic Sportsmen’s banquet our church puts on every year.

Our purpose is to share with men, woman, and children our love for the outdoors as well as our passion for Jesus Christ.

This year our speaker is Brad Herndon. He and his wife have done outdoor writing on a national level for 23 years, and do assignment photography for Realtree Camouflage, Nikon, Hoyt bows, Remington Arms, Thompson Center Arms, Cabela’s, and other outdoor companies. He is the author of the book, “Mapping Trophy Bucks.” Brad will share how to use topographical, aerial and plat maps to figure out how to put yourself in the best possible position to waylay deer, and especially trophy bucks.

This banquet will include a seminar on turkey hunting, dinner, displays from local vendors, as well as many prizes.

This year we are giving away a Parker Youth Bow for those under 14 and a Matthews Drenalin bow for those 15 & over!

When: Saturday, March 5th from 5-9 P.M. Doors Open at 4:45 P.M.
Where: The Ligonier Rec. Center 502 W Union Street Ligonier, IN.
Cost: It is free! There is a donation taken to offset some of the costs.

Space is limited. You can reserve your spot by calling the church at 260-761-2321 or by signing up at the Rec. Center.

For more information go to www.cospervillebc.com.

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Published by Spring Lake Archery on 15 Jan 2011

New Archery Park Opening in Virginia

New Archery Park Opening in Virginia

Spring Lake Outdoor Club (SLOC) is announcing the opening of a new Archery Park in Moneta, Virginia.  The park is open everyday sun up till sun down and is a function of the Spring Lake Outdoor Club.  The park is located at Spring Lake Farm in the heart of Bedford County.  There are  14 tournaments scheduled in 2011 with two of those being benefits for local organizations. The Park consists of several miles of trails, an extensive warm up area and a shooting tower (opening April ) with three levels to practice from.  The park is open to the public for a set fee per round. Practice rounds consist of 20 -25 McKenzie targets and the tower will include another 5 to 8 targets. Tournaments will start Feb. 12 and the grand opening is scheduled for April 16/17.  For more information go to : Shootarchery.com,  Spring Lake and Info. Page.

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Published by archerchick on 10 Jan 2011

The Tree, Buck Fever and Me~ By Jim Dougherty


BOW & ARROW MAGAZINE’S
BOWHUNTER’S ANNUAL 1979

The Tree, Buck Fever and Me ~ By Jim Dougherty

Does an experience bowhunter ever feel the effects of buck fever? Dougherty still does, and he’s glad that he does!

SOMEONE ASKED ME recently, toward the end of the last season, if I still got leg—wobbling nervous when big bucks and I happened to cross trails.
He assumed that because I had taken quite a few deer, among them some
highly respectable bucks, that perhaps the malady of buck fever was a thing
long gone. I was reminded by the question of an encounter not quite a year
old and used it as the base for my
answer.

It was A morning as clear and stiff as plate crystal when I wormed my
way into a favorite old oak, at the juncture of a bulge in the woods where
it gave way to the yearly Spring urgings of a creek bank. The Tree, and I
call it that with respect, was losing its battle with parasites and age but still
provided cover in a natural cup formed by a uniform four—way separation of
its trunk some eight feet high. From the almost natural fortress it covered
the intersection of four major trails. More important, it was to the thick—set
little bulge that big bucks on many days herded their does with just plain
sex on their minds.

There comes a time within each season when nothing else will do but to
spend the days in The Tree. This time historically has been the middle of November, and I know that sometime, something is going to take place here that I do not want to miss.
With the first breaking of day I was brought to rigid attention by the sound of approaching game, nature’s clattering signal provided by the ankle-deep leaves. It reminded me again how
extremely important one’s ears be- come when hunting from a blind.

My bow was hanging from the convenient broken stub of a once sturdy branch. The arrow was nocked, held in place by an arrow holder, a piece of equipment I consider as important as
the bow itself. I planted my feet firmly, grasped the bow and brought the string to my shooting hand with a positive, carefully controlled move.

The rustling in the leaves grew louder and then, in the morning’s gray gloom,
a round-sided, roly-poly doe slid into view less than ten yards from my hideout. Caught up in anticipation and suspense I slowly let out the breath that I had gulped down involuntarily when I
knew I was about to be visited, relaxing somewhat as I enjoyed the lady searching among the leaves for the bountiful mast crop that recent frosts and winds had allowed to shower the
floor of the woods.

The doe’s glands at her hocks were black and she carried her tail with
those cute come—on little motions a gal uses to capture a guy’s attention. The
lady was not alone, for somewhere on her back track, either very close or
soon to be hot on her trail would be a buck, I started gulping breaths again,
hoping to still the sound of my own breathing in order to better read audibly what might be behind. To my right some thirty yards was a well used scrape, one of four in a
twenty—five-yard square area. All about the creek bed and across the long
grassy flat I crossed to reach the bulge signs of individual bucks were evidenced by the rubs they had made on the little cherry trees and the bigger cedars. It has been said that age classes
of bucks can be determined by these rubs; that the bigger the tree the older and stouter, and therefore more desirable the buck. I do not know this to be fact, but I feel it is true.

On occasion I have watched bucks go through the routine of rubbing and there does seem to be a correlation of tree size to age class or rank in the hierarchy of the resident buck herd. I have not necessarily found this to be true of scrapes. One of the biggest bucks I have ever pursued (unsuccessfully so far) leaves runty little scrapes when his qualities are considered. I know they are his because I’ve watched him do it, otherwise I would never be convinced. Conversely, what he does to a cedar tree is awesome to behold. and I suspect that the mauling they take is often fatal. Cedar trees in my part of the country are hardy rascals, and he picks on the bigger ones.

The doe continued her prowling for nuts, drifting by me lazily without a
care in the world. Only once did she flick her tail quickly and punch up her
head for a long look-see of the area. Soon she was almost lost to my view
although still quite close, the thicket of the bulge and the faint early light
almost swallowing her up. I could mark her location by the rustling of leaves and. in the sharp quiet of the morning the occasional sounds as she chewed up an acorn. She was now to
my right. As the minutes passed I could see parts of her occasionally and noted that she was working with apparent purpose toward the scrape.

Minutes later she was there and her entire personality changed. No longer was she the relaxed lady of the forest. With her entire body stretched taut as the string on my hunting bow she advanced to the scrape, neck fully extended in a line that ran through to her tail, now fanned out and flickering but held parallel with her back. She investigated the scrape with her nose for some time, then quickly squatted and urinated, whether in it or by it I could not tell. The ritual completed she suddenly pranced off into the gloom of the woods, stopping only once before lost from sight.

There was no question in my mind that sometime during the course of this day I would have a chance at one of the four truly good bucks inthis area. Maybe I would not get a shot, but certainly I would see the big one or his slightly smaller brothers; that would be good enough. A chance begins to move in the right direction after game has been sighted.

Such situations do not, as a rule, begin to fall into place for the hunter who haphazardly takes to the woods and jumps into the first likely looking tree. They are the result of patient observation, of considerable scouting and numerous errors in judgment. The Tree and I had met five seasons previous, but before it all fell together I had hunted the area incorrectly on many days before I realized the significance of the thicket in the bulge and all the ingredients that made it a hot spot.

Once in the thicket, visibility is significantly reduced. Game can be in your lap without warning when the wind is blowing lightly, reducing the important sense of hearing. I learned the hard way that being ready was of the utmost importance when hunting here. Do not be misled, a deer can be too close. If you’re caught flat-foot you have to pay the piper.

I replaced my bow on its convenient natural hanger and relaxed, but
only slightly. I could reach the bow with a movement of less than six
inches of my bow hand,—its weight would swing the string to my fingers
and by straightening my knees I could be ready to shoot through any of the
openings by simply turning my feet encased in rubber-soled boots. My bow
quiver was removed to provide total clearance and reduce the possibilityof
unnecessary noise. I was as ready as can be and charged to the bursting
point.

A chunky fox squirrel ran through the overhead branches. At the first
rustle I started,·then relaxed and paid him no further mind. Only last season,
while watching a pair race with incredible abandon and agility through the
same branches a big ten point caught me cold. I had looked down, and he
was there, not twenty feet away. I could not move and, in short, he ate
my lunch. The lesson learned was clear, on those perfect mornings during the rut one’s mind and attention should not wander from the main objective. To do so was to invite disaster.

I was mid-point in shifting my weight for comfort when I picked up the unmistakable rustle of a deer traveling purposefully through the leaves.
From left to right it was coming, and my mind and body knew instinctively
it would be a buck.

What a buck he was. Like a thoroughbred bird dog he came at that purposeful trot, bulging neck low to the ground as his keen nose coursed the trail of the doe. He was the fourteen-pointed King of the Creekbot— tom, albeit two of the points branched from the long tined number two
point making him less than perfect in the score department, but symmetrical nonetheless. His mind and attention never wandered. He coursed the trail in a mile-eating gait, his heart and head
full of lust, and he went by The Tree so quick that my bow, while up, never rolled over the eccentric hump, he was past, leaving me at an awkward half-draw. Such moments are the height of excitement, and anxiety. What happened over the next twenty minutes was the epitome of all things that make bowhunting a most rewarding, and frustrating, pastime.

Within scant seconds the buck had passed from sight, hardly hesitating at the scrape. With a crashing commotion the doe hurtled into view coming in my direction, stiff legged, tail twitching with a provocative air designed to drive the most aloof of bucks wild.
The fourteen pointer was not aloof — he was in full, love—struck pursuit. Where the rest of the deer came from I do not know but, as though the commotion in the forest was a signal, another fine buck appeared on the scene and amidst the chaos two yearlings
bounded about, dashing in and out of the thicket. For fully ten minutes all the deer raced in a circular pattern through the thicket, around The Tree. The second buck was a dandy twelve point, less than perfect in conformation, although I am not a perfectionist when it comes to twelve point bucks.

But my eyes and heart were set on the bigger buck. There were lulls in the race when all involved stopped for a breather, all save yours truly poised in The Tree, bow up and half out, drawing hand firmly in place, turning slowly on the quiet rubber soles to follow the big buck’s course.
The two bucks never clashed, the smaller staying close but never totally entering the race. The big buck had served notice once, stalking bullishly to a scrubby little oak he quite literally demolished it amidst much growling and pawing. Three times his trotting pursuit of the fine old doe brought him within mere feet of my spot. The bow at full draw became a physical enemy itself, but a clear good shot was never quite offered.

I became aware of the increasing rustle of trembling leaves on The Tree
almost subconsciously. The branches that swept out from my spot reached
as far as ten feet, sloping down from years of age toward the ground. As yet
the old girl had not given up all her leaves to the urgings of Fall. As I became aware of the almost violent shaking it occurred to me that, as yet on this crisp clean morning, not a breath of air had stirred. The stirring was caused by the involuntary trembling that began in my knees, relayed down my legs to the soles of my feet perched less and less firmly on the main branches that gave birth to the now offending vibrations. Much worse, that same shattering vibration was racing
up through my chest in a violent attempt to strangle me.

Now the battle took on new dimension, a war with nerves and the fickle
racing of the doe. Would she lead the buck to a clear path for my arrow before I was reduced to inept shambles.

Buck fever, if that’s what you choose to call it, takes many strange
forms. In answer to the question, my story is stark answer, I am not immune
to such emotions and hope I never am. Big bucks, be they muleys or whitetails, blow my composure more than any other wild thing. The fine line between being able to remain somewhat
functional and totally wasted is in direct proportion to the length of time I am faced with the target before I have to react.

I spend countless hours developing a place to lie in wait for a big buck
whitetail. If he shows suddenly and I am ready then the odds are on my
side; if he diddles and dawdles in his approach the odds slip dramatically to
his side of the ledger. Ihave tried all sorts of tricks in an attempt to climb
into my mind and sort it out when such an event is in the making. I talk
to myself, I close my eyes, I ignore the buck, I try never (it’s impossible) to
look too much at his headgear. None of it really works, for in the framework of your head, banging kettle drums and cymbals sound the clanging message that He is coming. I am reminded of a darn nice Oklahoma buck my number two son took this past season. We placed his stand
after patient observation of a thicket the bucks were using. On the second morning the snapping of a twig advertised the approach of game and Kelly turned to peek over his left shoulder.

A matronly doe was being prodded into the thicket by a buck with headgear far better than Kelly had ever had close. His heart leaped up between his ears and it seemed to become unusually warm. He solved the problem by relying solely on his ears, never once again looking.
“No way was I going to look at him again,” he said. As the rustling in the
leaves grew louder Kelly drew his bow, and when all seemed right and the
strain of sixty-five pounds began to tell he pivoted, found the buck’s chest and popped him all in one motion at fifteen feet. The buck collapsed on the spot. So, too, did Kelly.
In The Tree the shaking of the leaves did not abate as the buck tried to close with the doe. She would allow him to come close, then dash off on a wild plunge through the thicket. Huffing, puffing and growling deep in his chest the buck would follow, stopping occasionally to shake his head or hook a low hanging branch. Eventually the pattern shifted, the big deer were gone, the two yearlings still pouncing about trying to figure what were the changes that had taken place amongst
the old folks. I suspect the yearlings. fawns of the year actually, belonged to the doe. They would be pushed aside until after the courtship was consummated, and then perhaps they would
all join together until the following Spring when new responsibilities would cause her to chase them off to fend for themselves.

The incident was over for now. For almost a half hour I had one of the best whitetails I’ve ever seen within twenty yards. I had witnessed an interesting, exciting ritual among our most
popular and elusive game animals. For the entire time I was at full, muscle-straining alert, and I had been subjected to a satisfying attack of the malady called buck fever.

Satisfying? Sure it was. I was dishrag limp and feeling more alive than I had in months. Hunting, for man, is a natural and emotional thing. We are the ultimate predator, but we are human and should experience emotion unlike the dispassionate killing for survival as done by a coyote or cougar. I marvel at the man who tells me he feels none of the tremblings in knees or the shortness of breath, and I feel sorry for him.

Yes, I still get leg-wobbling nervous when big bucks and I cross trails. I did the following morning when I caught the twelve pointer mid—stride and watched him go down in ten short yards. Sometimes the ol’ fever gets me. and sometimes I beat it. I hope it
never changes. <—<<

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Published by archerchick on 07 Jan 2011

WHITETAIL BASICS ~ By Charlie Kroll


BOW & ARROW HUNTING
OCTOBER 1989


WHITETAIL BASICS ~ By Charlie Kroll

Still-hunting is the purest form of the sport, but becoming a lost art.

HALF A CENTURY ago, when I first began hunting deer, the longbow,
wood arrows and single—blade broadheads were the only available choices
for an aspiring bowhunter. Hunting from elevated stands was illegal and still hunting, a ground—blind ambush or a group drive were the options of pursuit.
Still-hunting was then, and remains today, the purest form of the sport, placing the hunter and the hunted on more equal footing than drives or ambushes.

Today, however, still-hunting is all but a lost art. Why do I bring it up? Simply because
I believe it is to the advantage of the novice to give it a try. By doing so, one can learn more about what makes his quarry tick and about the balance existing between instincts and reasoning than
in any other way.

We all are taught that basics win sporting events. In football, it’s the basics of blocking and tackling. In basketball, it’s the basics of dribbling, passing and follow-up and in track and field,
it’s timing and pace that separate the winners from the losers.

Success in hunting also depends greatly on basics, but of a slightly different sort. The basics I refer to here are those governing the actions of the game, i.e., knowledge of animal senses of sight, smell and hearing and how critically these are employed. It is really difficult for the beginner to realize how honed these senses are in deer. The best way to find out is to devote some time to the one-on-one still-hunt, which is simply the attempt to discover game while slowly easing through the coverts, followed by a careful stalk to get within reasonable arrow range.

It takes some personal experience to fully comprehend the extreme acuteness of sight in an animal that can hardly distinguish a man at rest from a stump, yet can detect the slightest motion a hundred yards away across tree trunks, logs or brush and when every branch is swaying with the breeze.

To avoid the senses of sight and hearing requires not only reasonably quiet underfooting, but also acquired skill and care in moving, aided by eyesight almost as keen as that of the game.
When you begin to comprehend the sharpness of the eyes against which you are matched, you are still about as far as ever from understanding the nose of the deer. The idea that the animal can detect your odor a quarter of a mile away when no breeze is blowing is often rather astounding to the novice. Still more so is the idea that the slightest taint of human odor reaching that keen nose causes instantaneous reaction.

When a deer is alerted by sound or sight it may pause to assess the possible danger. But when man scent reaches its nose, it is gone; right now! It generally costs the beginner, as it did me, many bitter days of frustration learning that he cannot trifle with the nose of the deer.

Therefore, your first care in still hunting should be to constantly be aware of the direction of the wind, however light it may be. Pay attention fo the old adage of hunting high ground
early and low ground late in the day to take advantage of the thermal flows.

Cross currents may at time enable you to work within bow shot of a deer, but you can’t really rely on it, especially if the current tends to shift about, as it often does in hilly country. Use of a cover scent may be of help, but it is my studied opinion that if a deer can smell anything you have on, it can detect the human odor as well.

lt is almost as hard to realize the acuteness of hearing of a deer. Probably more deer are lost to the tyro through this than any other cause. The great majority of those that elude hunters, escape unseen and generally unheard. It takes long to learn that you cannot afford to crack even the lightest twig, or even let the softest snow pack too fast beneath your foot. You can hardly move
too quietly in even the wildest of cover.

There is a lot to be said for observing just how unalarmed deer move while
feeding and imitating those movements when some ground cover noise is unavoidable.
If you are in dense cover where you suspect deer are skulking or hiding, do not be misled by the fact that at such times they do not seem to mind noise. When deer hide it is because they know
what you are, but believe you cannot see them.

Some hunters believe that a day of blustering wind is a good one, providing you keep facing into it. It has been my experience, though, that such a day is a poor time to still—hunt because the
animals are highly nervous with watching and listening. The best type of day for this activity is a dull, overcast day, possibly with intermittent light drizzle, following an all-night rain.

One of my greatest bowhunting achievements was made years ago on just such a day, when I managed to get close enough to a feeding whitetail to completely unglue it by a tap on the
rump with the tip of my bow.

Incidentallly, if hunting on such a day, stick pretty much to the lower ground levels. Moisture causes air to settle and there is less chance of it carrying a message of danger than if you
were on higher ground. Of extreme importance to the still- hunter is that he sees the game before it sees him. Given two creatures in the woods, each in search of the other, the greater advantage lies with the one that happens to be still when the other one is moving within sight range. The best
time for this with deer is when they are feeding and moving, for they are nearly impossible to approach when bedded.

This is why early morning and evening are good, as then the deer are moving and feeding. Just after daylight is the best hour of all, as the animals have alternately fed and rested all night
relatively undisturbed, they are then as relaxed and unwary as they ever get. To take proper advantage of this, you absolutely have to be in their travel area, between feeding and bedding
grounds, before dawn breaks. I f you have to hurry to get there before daybreak, you might as well forget it. You will then have to go against the first law of the still—hunter: a snail’s pace.

You cannot movefast and you cannot move constantly and expect to see animals before they see you. Yes, there are certainly other considerations to be noted in order to achieve success. Among these are appropriate dress of a camo pattern blending with the general type of terrain hunted and of soft, noiseless finish; proper attention to camouflage of the face, hands and bow, some knowledge of current food preferences and knowledge of such signs as mbs, scrapes and
in-use trails.

Next to the difficulty of comprehending the acuteness of a deer’s senses is that of understanding how one looks in cover. Your ideas might come from seeing deer in a zoo or park, or from pictures. But you are almost certain to start out by looking for an entire deer, whereas you might better be looking for almost anything else. ln the woods, you seldom see more than part of a deer, at least to begin with. Concentration should be on horizontal lines and on color patches or spots out of place, plus slight movements such as that of an ear, nose, antlers or tail. To succeed at this
you need to do considerably more looking than moving.

When you are moving in cover, every step you take opens new avenues of vision. You must curb the tendency to see what’s over’ the next rise. If you don’t travel slowly you won’t see any-
thing there except perhaps the sight of a white flag waving goodbye. Again, the name of game is seeing the quarry before it sees you. Deer have good peripheral vision, but it is possible to approach one broadside, providing that you move slowly, directly toward it and only when its head is down. In such a final attempt to close within arrow range, avoid direct eye contact, concentrating instead on the spot you want to hit and remembering that whitetail usually signals a lift of the head by first wiggling its tail a bit. Of course, an approach from behind is the best one when possible, especially when the animal is moving into or across the wind.


It sometimes happens that a novice has the luck to run into a “foolish” deer or two on his first hunt. If he is successful, he will begin to think there is nothing to it. Then, of course, he may hunt
for several years with no repeat of his original success. Any bowman matching himself for several seasons against the whitetail deer will not only acknowledge the acuteness of their sensory defenses, but may come to believe that they have a sixth sense on top of all the rest.

Yes, still-hunting is the toughest way to go, but remember, if a kill every time out were the most important part of hunting, you wouldn’t be reading BOW & ARROW HUNTING. The still-hunt
is the most exciting, the most challenging and when success is finally achieved, the most satisfying adventure the lands beyond the pavement have to offer. <–<<

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Published by archerchick on 06 Jan 2011

Decoying Pronghorns ~ By Bob Humphrey


BOWHUNTING WORLD
October 2006

Decoying Pronghorns By Bob Humphrey

Is it possible to lure one of the fastest and wariest of game animals into bow range, even without cover?

Before my Wyoming bowhunt last fall, my only experience with pronghorns was chasing them around Yellowstone National Park with a camera. I quickly learned just how sharp- eyed, wary and fast they were. Even my basic stalking skills and telephoto lens weren’t enough to get me close enough for a decent photo. Thus, I was pretty skeptical about the whole idea of luring them into bow range with a decoy. Still I’d heard enough stories about how effective and exciting the technique could be; so when the opportunity presented itself, I jumped.

My first chance came while bowhunting on the Medicine Bow River Ranch in southeastern Wyoming. Accompanying me were fellow outdoor writer Joe Byers, Ken Byers, of Byers Media and Mike DiSario and Teddy Burger, of Outdoor Expeditions International (OEI)- our hosts. Joe was was the only one of us fortunate enough to draw a non-resident “goat” tag, but was kind enough to invite me along to man the decoy.

It also didn’t take long for us to locate a likely band of goats. After formulating a quick plan of attack, Ken dropped Joe, Teddy, and me off behind a knoll, then drove on. The habitat consisted of low rolling plains , with topography providing the only cover. “We need to get as close as we can before we put up the decoy” advised Joe. And that’s exactly what we did, sneaking within a couple hundred yards of the herd, which consisted of a dozen or so does and three bucks. Once we were in position, Joe gave the word. Here goes nothing , I thought., as I hoisted the decoy, a Renzo’s two-dimensional buck silhouette into position.

The sharp-eyed goats immediately turned their heads in our direction, but I didn’t give us the reaction we’d hoped for. The bucks held their ground while the does, seemingly more antsy, slowly started walking away. Then the largest of the bucks made a feint in our direction, and my pulse quickened. Could this actually be working? I wondered.

The tense buck stared in our direction for several minutes, then glanced back
toward the herd, which had moved off a considerable distance. He glanced back
once more in our direction, then turned and trotted off after the herd. Strike one.
Our second attempt met with similar results. Strike two. “They’re just not in the
mood,” opined Joe. “We need to find a more aggressive buck. So off we went
once more. The ranch was overrun with goats, and it didn’t take long to find yet
another band.

The next group contained several does and one big buck. I wouldn’t know one from the next,
but I could tell by doe’s reaction it was a real good one. Even
better, he and several does were bedded near a pump station that provided ideal
stalking cover. Again we crawled as close as we could, Joe got ready to shoot, and l
propped up the decoy.

This time the reaction was much more what we had hoped for. The bedded buck
sprang to his feet and took several deliberate steps in our direction. But the does,
unnerved by his sudden movement, again started in the opposite direction. He held
his ground, then started slowly toward us, eventually covering l00 yards. Once again however,
the allure of the does prevailed over our decoy, and the buck turned and trotted
away. Strike three.

Joe did eventually manage to take a nice buck the following day, while l was
off hunting mulies. Though l wasn’t able to witness it, my experience from the
previous day was enough to whet my appetite for another try. Before I went back,
however, l wanted to learn more. So l consulted someone far more experienced.

Decoying: There’s More In It
“There’s a true art to decoying, regardless of what you’re after,” says Steve Bailey, of Renzo’s Becoys. “There’s a lot more to it than lust sticking a decoy in the ground. This much l’d learned already. What l wanted to know is what that “lot more” is; and
Bailey was eager to expound. “When decoying pronghorns,” he began,
“the first thing to consider is when you will be hunting. Prior to the rut you use a decoy
not so much as a stalking tool, but as a confidence decoy, around food sources and waterholes. In the early season,
I’m not looking for the same response as during the rut.
All I want is to give the animal a little curiosity, or make them feel more comfortable
and keep their focus away from me.” That all made sense. Pronghorn are social animals,
having others of their kind around might put them more at ease.

The next step, according to Bailey, is to decide the decoy’s intended purpose. “Do
you want it to be a billboard, or more subtle? You can set your decoy as a billboard,
out in the wide open where it can be seen from miles away, or just to get their attention
when they’re closer. Every situation is different, but if you’ve got animals visiting a
waterhole regularly, the subtle approach might be better. In either case, Bailey cautions
that it’s very important not to block entrance or exit routes—the way they want to come and go.
“I don’t want to spook them, so I may use a more subtle approach, with a decoy bedded or tucked into the brush”

The Rut
Decoying during the rut is when things can really get exciting, and it calls for different tactics. “What you get is a very aggressive buck that may cover a lot of ground, especially when he’s trying to drive out a rival or younger buck from the does he’s herded up. He may run in from a half-mile away,” says Bailey. Now you want your decoy to be a billboard. First you’ve got to locate a likely candidate. In general, Bailey looks for aggressive bucks that suit him in terms of size and age.

During the pre-rut, he looks for bachelor groups where bucks are either sparring or seriously fighting. “These bucks are probably a little more vulnerable,” he says. Later, during the rut, he looks for satellite bucks, which can be equally vulnerable. But he cautions not to be overly aggressive. “Use a decoy that’s smaller than him, or use only does. He’s probably been beat up a little and may be wary of a larger buck” He also advises against targeting mature bucks, at least for beginners. “An older buck with a big group of does is usually the hardest to decoy or pursue in any way. He’s not gonna wander too far from them or let that group get too far away.” This seemed to explain at least part of our failure in Wyoming.

Once you’ve located your intended victim, you can attack in one of two ways. Rather
than putting the decoy out right off the bat, Bailey prefers to stalk in as close as possible,
then go with the decoy. (At least we got that part right! “Once you do,” he says, “you don’t necessarily want to walk straight in and be too aggressive. Parallel him while slowly closing the distance. Often they’ll watch and study until they get tired of watching.”
That’s when things can get real interesting, according to Bailey. “It’s pretty hair-raising
and can be very dramatic. They may charge to within 10 or 20 yards then slam on the brakes, leaving a trail of dust behind ’em and making you wonder if you want to run or not.”

Circumstances often dictate how you set up and position. “When there’s sufficient cover, I’ll set up to draw the animal past the shooter and toward the decoy. It takes his radar off the shooter,” says Bailey. That’s not always possible, however, and in some cases the decoy is your cover. “When bowhunting in the open,” he recommends, “I’d have two guys and two decoys. This conceals them both and gives the illusion of more animals, for confidence. Bailey points out that movement can often be helpful. “One of the neatest tactics you can use is to mimic things going on in the wild. Use a doe and a buck decoy. Have your hunting partner or guide run one and you run the other, mimicking a buck running a doe.”

The Two Dimensional Advantage

Naturally, Bailey is partial to his Benzo‘s silhouettes, and with good reason. “The concept of our decoys is simplicity,” he relates. “Sometimes it doesn’t take much, and it doesn’t have to be three dimensional. You can use multiple decoys and take them into areas you wouldn’t have considered before. He also noted that it’s easier to sneak into decoying range with a two—dimensional decoy. “I just lay it down and go prone until I get myself out l there. Then I can push the metal rods into the dirt and the decoy is free-standing.”

Keep A Buck Call Handy
In addition to movement, you can sometimes boost your decoys’ effectiveness by
calling. “I use a call that simulates bucks being aggressive toward one another,” says
Bailey, “sort of a squeaky little snort-bark sound.” However, he advises caution. “I
don’t want to throw all my eggs at ’em at once, so I’ll save the call for last.” He notes
that a buck may charge, but only come part-way, then wander or race back to his
herd. “lf he’s not coming close enough, then I start calling to him.”

Long-Range Proficiency Helps
You also need a bow set up for Western hunting. “lt’s big country, it’s open,” says Bailey. “A decoy may only help you close the distance to 60 yards.” That calls for a fast, flat-shooting bow. Pronghorns aren’t particularly tough or thick-skinned, so you can also speed up your outfit by going to a lighter broadhead-arrow combination. More important is practice.

The goal of decoying is to bring a pronghorn into effective bow range, which out West may be more than you’re accustomed to. “Most guys are looking for a 20-yard shot. They practice at 20 and 50 yards and that’s what they’re used to.” If you’re going to try this
he recommends practicing until you’re proficient out to 50 or 60 yards. “It doesn’t take that much to fool a pronghorn,” says Bailey. “You just need a good decoy, some common sense, and a little knowledge about the animal.” He also notes that decoys won’t work all of the time. “It’s all about attitude. You gotta catch
the animal in the right mood. Sometimes it’s only a matter of a day, or even a few hours. When they’re in the right mood and everything is right, the decoy can totally fool them.” He also cautions it’s infectious. “You get to the point after a few successful stalks where if you don’t have your decoy, you don’t want to go.”

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Published by archerchick on 06 Jan 2011

Colorado…Where The Big Muleys Come To The Hunter! ~By Ed Welch as told to Roy Hoff


BOW & ARROW
October 1977

Colorado…Where The Big Muleys Come To The Hunter!
And Where An Easterner Finally Realized His Western Dream
By Ed Welch as told to Roy Hoff

THE ONLY ADJECTIVE in my limited vocabulary that can adequately
describe my l975 bow and arrow deer season at John Lamicq’s is outstanding!
We, the “Boys From New York,” scored four for six during the two weeks of our hunt.
After two rather dry years for myself at Lamicq’s, dreams of a record muley finally
materialized. For background music, my bowhunting experiences date back to 1946
when I arrowed my first whitetail at ten yards with a fifty-three-pound homemade recurve. Since that time, I have scored on over fifty whitetails in both New York and Pennsylvania.

After this rather impressive record, and with confidence at a high level,
my bowhunting partner Ben Swan and I decided that 1973 was the year to
hunt with John Lamicq in “Colorful Colorado.” Swan took a nice buck in 1973,
drew a blank in 1974, and scored again in 1975 with a typical four-by-four.
My first Colorado muley came suddenly on the second full day of our 1975 hunt.

Nelson Harrington, Swan and I were planning a stalk near upper Four-A – which is a section of high-timbered ridge — early in the afternoon of the second day of the hunt. lt was August 18, with temperatures in the eighties. My plan was to still—hunt just below the rim of the ridge, meeting Harrington and Swan under an out- crop of rocks at about 3:30 p.m. part way along the hogback.

They, in turn, would hunt the opposite side of the ridge to the prearranged spot. Having hunted this area in previous years, l was alert for bedded deer just under the rim, It seemed as if I had
hardly begun my stalk through the sage and scrub oak when I raised my head to scan a long, narrow, grassy area directly on top of the ridge. To my surprise, heading toward me at a
trot with nose to the ground was the largest-antlered and biggest-bodied mule deer I have ever seen!

I suddenly realized that I was standing in the open and entirely exposed to this monster. Not only did I feel inferior and inadequate to cope with such an animal. but it was also immediately apparent that I was standing directly in the middle of the very same deer run he had chosen. My only recourse was to drop down onto one knee and try to hide myself behind a small blow-down consisting of one three-inch-diameter branch of aspen with no leaves.

Imagine my feelings when he continued at a trot, pausing only long enough to raise his head and test the wind. Fortunately, the wind was in my favor so on he came! At fifteen yards the impossible happened. He stopped. raised his head and decided to change direction ninety degrees.
His new course took him directly behind a small pine tree, screening him entirely from my view. Now was my chance! Raising on one knee, I brought my forty-four-pound custom recurve to full draw and held at his approximate point of reappearance. It seemed like ages, but probably only a
second or two passed when he stepped from behind the pine tree, offering me a perfect lung shot.
As my arrow left the bow I knew I had him. His heavy antlered head swung in my direction with his eyes and facial expression appearing to ask, “Where in hell did you come from?” The arrow buried itself in his huge body directly behind the scapula, penetrating completely through the lungs and exiting between the first two ribs on his right side.

With an excited lunge, he bolted over the edge of the ridge and down the canyon wall. Suddenly, all was quiet. Needless to say, I was shaking like a leaf with the excitement and anticipation of finding my once-in-a-lifetime trophy. After taking a moment to calm down, I descended the canyon wall and scanned the area for the direction he had taken. A short walk brought me within
sight of him, sprawled precariously in the middle of a large scrub oak which had retarded his plunge toward the bottom of the canyon.

After taking pictures, I glanced at my watch – exactly 3:30 p.m., August 18. I had finally realized a life-long ambition – to hunt Colorado and successfully take a trophy mule deer.
The remainder of this story is rather anti-climactic. As any dyed-in-the-wool hunter knows, when the kill is made, the work begins. After completing the field dressing, I made my way to our prearranged spot, only to find Harrington and Swan heading in my direction. Their stalk had been
fruitless, but as they approached me, I could contain myself no longer. The excited look on my face together with my bloodied hands had them begging for the story.

As we made our way to the kill, I still found my good fortune hard to
believe. The deer had fallen in a tangle of scrub oak on a steep shale slide,
making it nearly impossible for three people to drag it up to the, top of the
ridge. In addition, my pickup was still about two miles away, parked near
Lamicq’s narrow dirt road. With the deer, estimated at about 250 pounds, field dressed, we had no recourse but to quarter it and backpack it out. Three trips were necessary to gain the top of the
canyon with the cape and meat. After arriving at Lamicq’s and more picture taking, the story was told again. Some friends of ours from Florida, Cecil Hatcher and his family,

were overjoyed at our success as their luck so far had been rather lean. The next day required a trip to Colscotts Locker Plant in Grand Junction to package and freeze the meat and a stop at the taxidermist to make final arrangements for mounting my muley. The next week was to see a repeat of this story when Swan connected with a fine, typical four-by-four. His story will be arriving by mule deer, as well it should, because that, as you know, is the “name of the game”! <—<<

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Published by archerchick on 06 Jan 2011

Ground Attack ~ By Jeff Murray

BOWHUNTING WORLD
October 2006

GROUND ATTACK – By Jeff Murray

When it comes to getting close, your tactics toolbelt should include blinds.  No longer the cumbersome contraptions they once were.  Today’s innovative blinds are proving their worth with top guides and outfiitters.

According to recent Pope and Young records, about three-fourths of all
whitetail entries involve treestands. But as much as I love a “height advantage”
I find myself land-lubbing it more and more each year. In fact, I’m just about convinced
that the portable ground blind—which used to be an oxymoron I0 years ago—is as
effective as the portable treestand.

Have I lost my mind? Some of it. I know I’ve lost my narrow-mindedness, not to mention
a few staunch opinions. And I’m also losing some habits, such as fighting with treesteps
in my sleep; dreaming about falling out of trees, and nightmares about swaying in wind
and rain from dark-dawn to dusk-dark.  My new outlook is fueled by two key factors.

First, the latest portable designs are, well. more portable than ever. And second, we’ve
learned a lot about ground pounding from a decade of hardcore experience. We’ve
learned for example that blinds are ideal for turkeys. But blinds are equally deadly on
pronghorns, mule deer and elk. We’ve even learned that whitetails are susceptible to the
right blind at the right place with the right tactic.

Need proof? How about the 200—inch 5×5 buck that Mike Wheeler guided New Jersey
bow hunter Aaron Moore last year.   If that deer isn’t big enough for you, consider the 2003 monster (38 points, 307 5/8
harvested by 15—year-old Tony Lovstuen.
Yes, it was taken from a ground blind.

OLD VS. NEW

The first portable blind I hunted out of was an Invisiblind that Mark Mueller asked me to
field-test. Erection and disassembly were a little time-consuming, no doubt, but it was a
leap in the right direction. Mueller figured out back then that camo netting goes
with portable blinds like peanut butter & jelly sandwiches go with kids. He relied on the
netting mainly for concealing hunters inside and the ability to shoot broadheads through
the material. But the netting proved to serve another important purpose .

In 1995 I first heard about Double Bull Blinds and I got my hands on a lightweight
model the following year. This blind date was made in heaven. The pop—out hubs
locked rods in place that, in turn, stretched the walls of the tent-like structure neatly
into place. In seconds l was up and running and down ‘n’ dirty bowhuntin’. My new blind
was a constant companion in turkey country, and I was madly in love with it.

Shortly thereafter I discovered the “coiled” spring steel concept. Today, anyone can stow
away, say, on Ameristep Doghouse portable, even if an airline ticket is part of the hunt; the
blind’s dimensions are a mere 2×24 inches. And blinds keep getting better and better.
Double Bull now offers the Matrix, a 360-degree viewing and shooting blind that has all
the bells and whistles. Not to be outdone,  Ameristep is promoting the Brickhouse Half-
N-Half that features two complementary camo patterns on opposite sides, just in case the
scenery calls for flexibility. Underbrush incorporates  3-D leafy material that blends naturally
with surroundings and moves in synch with Natures wind currents; the Bowhunter spans 5×5 feet and weighs—what else?—5 pounds.
Then there’s a series of Excent (carbon-activated fabric lined) models from Eastman Outfitters to help deal with scent buildup.

GETTING GROUNDED

Blinds offer several distinct advantages. Most are strategic, but the one topping my list
is psychological: l’m addicted to eye-to-eye combat, with game being clueless to my
presence. I feel like the Invisible Man inside a portable. Other advantages include:
*Extreme portability (no treesteps, no ladders, no safety belts).
*Surprising scent—control (top models sporting a roof and four walls confine scent
with remarkable efficiency).
*No trees, no sweat (set up where you want, not where a tree says so).
*Deke out turkeys and deer with a well-placed decoy.

*Hunt aggressively while relaxing (ignore wind, rain, snow; relax in a folding camp chair or recliner).
* Hunt trophy elk and pronghorns near waterholes without a pick and shovel.
*Make a mule deer’s frontline defense- acute eyesight—his Achilles’ heel.
This is all possible if you follow the rules. Start with no flappin’. lf your blind flaps in the breeze, it will spook game. Period. So
make good use of tent spikes, but also make a discerning purchase and eliminate models
that are loose-fitting and baggy. Another bugaboo associated with ground blinds is the Black Hole Syndrome. Deer are
especially spooky when confronted with a small, dark object. Perhaps its because critters such as fox, coyotes and wolves prey out of
dens. Regardless, the best antidote is camo netting. Because it reflects sunlight, it replaces dark shadows with greens, browns and grays.
“I remember the day we finally saw the Iight,” recalled Brooks Johnson, of Double Bull
Archery. “We got a tip from Mike Palmer, a custom bowyer from Texas with a ton of experience
hunting whitetails from the ground. He told us about the netting, and over the years we’ve
continually improved ways to eliminate the dark openings on our silent windows.
Ironically, after removing black from the setup, the next critical step is adding black-
today, all Double Bull blinds are jet black inside, as are the carbon-fabric-lined models
from Eastman Outfitters and Ameristep. “If a bIind’s interior is camouflage material
and you wear camouflage clothing,” adds Johnson’s partner, Keith Beam, “you’re fine
as long as you don’t move. But the instant you draw your bow, deer will usually spot
you. We learned that from twin-blind setups we filmed out of. Nowadays, we always wear
black inside—we even customize the upper limb of our bows—because black against
black is virtually invisible. You’ve got to experience it to believe it ”
To that end, Double Bull offers a complete  line of “Ninja” accessories, including a black
head cover and a black fleece jacket. When  the weather is warm (a little greenhouse
effect can really heat up these blinds), a   Scent-Lok Base layer long-sleeve top is ideal.
This ultra-lightweight polyester garment  contains scent-eliminating activated charcoal
plus an anti-microbial bacteria fighter.   “You get a great one-two punch,” says veteran
bowhunter Tod Graham. “Invisibility plus  personal odor elimination. But you still need to
go the extra mile, scent-wise, on the outside [of  the blind]. For example, when hunting out West,
cut some sage brush and place it on the roof.   In farm country, fresh cow pies will do. In deep
woods, cedar and pine boughs are great.”

SETUPS FOR BLIND LUCK

How you set up a blind is as important as  where you place it. What works for one
species likely won’t work for another. Let’s start with turkeys. l recently asked Ameristep’s
Pat McKenna if their blinds helped beginners with gobblers. He sent me a stack of testimonials.
Consider that 15-year-old Ashely Cole   shot her first big tom with her father on a
Wisconsin hunt; Justin Temple scored on   his first tom in Michigan; Mike Gaboriault, a
disabled Gulf War veteran from Vermont,  followed suit. These turkey success stories
seem to have no end!  Set up a blind where turkeys are likely to pitch off a roost, and
return to it toward evening (where legal hunting hours apply). Or, find a travel route
connecting loafing and feeding areas. You’ll see for yourself if you watch a little TV and
let Ralph and Vicki Cianciarulo (Archers Choice), Mike Avery (Outdoor Magazine), or
the Scent-Lok gang take you along for the ride.   The antelope, according to guide and
outfitter Fred Eichler, is the perfect big game if species to take portable blind—hunting to
the next level. “From 10 years of antelope  guiding, l’d say you get the best of both
worlds—a good challenge, yet good odds if you do your homework.”
Eichler offers these tips for the prairies:

*When setting up a blind on a water hole or cattle tank, first determine the side
with the most tracks along the shoreline. To further tip the odds, pile up some
sagebrush on the opposite side to discourage antelope from drinking there. Even an
arrow in the mud with a flapping sock can redirect antelope to your side of the pond.
“*Wind can be a factor, but antelope usually rely more on their eyes than their noses,
especially where there is little human activity.  Although Eichler has harvested antelope
on the same day he’s set up his blind, its usually best to give them time to acclimate to the
setup—as much as four weeks, if possible.

Whitetails are the big leagues of the ground attack game. Start by mastering the
“50/100 Rule. Interestingly, in dense cover where visibility is limited to 50 yards or less,
it’s critical that the blind not be recognizable.  The best tack, according to outfitter extraordinaire Steve Shoop, is building a brush
pile during the off season, then sawing a hole inside and placing the blind within. This hides the blind, all right, but also gives deer
a chance to get used to the brush pile.

Popular TV host Jay Gregory tried blind-hunting last year and arrowed a fine whitetail. “If you’re lucky enough to
hunt an area with cedars, try this,” Gregory says. “Prune just enough boughs to wedge your blind up against the tree trunk. Then
place the boughs on top and in front of the blind. The scent of the fresh [cuttings] seems

to help, and cedars are usually thick enough to obscure the blind. I shot my buck on the
same day I set up my blind!”
Now for the “100” part of the 50/100 Rule.
Ironically, deer tend to ignore a blind when they can spot it from 100 yards or more.
Apparently, they eye it over and, if nothing moves and no scent alerts them, they consider
it a part of the landscape much like, say, an abandoned truck or tractor in a field. ln fact, wherever man-made
structures are common, ground blinds are ideal, according to a noted whitetail guide like Wheeler. Zero in
on windmills, abandoned buildings, farm machinery, center pivot irrigation stations, old tires, hay bales, silos, fences, gates—you
name it. “Deer are already used to something  different in their area,” Wheeler maintains, “and a blind just seems to fit right in.”
Elk are particularly vulnerable to a discriminating blind setup. A few years ago,  Nebraska buddy Doug Tryon shared a secret
mountain-top burn in southern Colorado where elk fed predictably on the lush vegetation. But they showed up only when the wind kissed
their noses, and it was impossible to get below them. So I came prepared and tucked a portable
blind into a clump of junipers. Blind luck!  Cows meandered within feet, and a raghorn wandered with in 10 yards. Soon a nice bull
showed up and took the whole herd with him, but here’s betting he’ll be there again this fall ….

Levi Johnson, from Winnette, Montana, guides elk for Flatwillow Creek Outfitters
considers a ground blind a top tactic for arrowing big bulls:
“Once our bulls gather cows,   there are too many eyes and  noses for the average hunter
to deal with. But setting up over water, especially on a  hot September afternoon,  can simplify a complicated
hunt. ln 2005, Mike Huff  and l watched a nice 300- class 6X6 steer his cows
into a steep draw where the wind was all wrong  for a morning hunt. So we backed out and returned in
the afternoon, set up our blind on a waterhole at the end of the draw and, in the scorching
100 degree heat, watched the bull jump into the pond with a cow and calf next to him.
They were clear up to their bellies when I shot the bull at 45 yards.
“Last fall, I set up my blind near a different waterhole on the second evening of archery

season. I’d tried in vain to hunt this waterhole with a treestand, but the wind was always giving me away. Well, I heard what sounded like
hooves pounding turf, and when I peered out of my window I saw about 20 cows and a big 7×7 heading straight for me. I let all of the elk
drink, and the bull was within easy bow range when my arrow found its mark.”

Johnson’s keys to hunting elk with ground blinds;

*Since elk don’t seem too bothered by blinds, don’t waste a lot of time brushing them in. In fact, you can hunt out of a blind
the day you set it up over a waterhole.
*Always stake your blind down no matter the weather. In Western states like Montana, it can be calm one second and a tornado the next.
*Open only the windows you intend to shoot out of, and leave the others shut tight; the less light inside the blind the better.
Stay calm and wait for a good shot.  When Johnson’s friends watched the video of last year’s hunt, they wondered why it took
him so long to shoot. The longer you let a bull relax at a waterhole, the better the results. Be patient. Resist the urge to leave the
blind for any reason. Stay put and stay tuned.
Mule deer, like the one whitetail expert Tod Graham is posing with above, can be had
for the right price The price is mainly scouting for details. “Glass fields early and late to
locate a worthy buck, figure out his bedding area with different winds, and take good
notes Graham says. “Once you see a buck use the same trail twice, you can kill him
with a blind. The third time’s the charm.  “I don’t worry much about cover, because
it usually doesn’t exist in good muley country.

Just put your blind where you can get off a good shot—even in the middle of a field.
Mulies must think it’s a hay bale the farmer has relocated because they don’t veer
around it. I remember telling this to my guide in Alberta last year. I’d suggested we
set up my portable blind on the downwind side of a wild oat field where a big buck

was hanging out with a bachelor group of six other bucks. The guide chuckled at my suggestion, but l got the last laugh when he
helped me drag 195 inches of muley antlers back to his truck.”
Drew H. Butterwick, Double Bull pro staffer and host of Art of Deception (Men’s Channel), loves bowhunting black bears out
of a portable ground blind. “Close contact is why we bowhunt, and a blind can put you in the heart of the action,” he says. “But blinds
are superior to treestands for bear hunting. It is easier to intercept ’staging’ bruins that
hang back from a bait as darkness  approaches. And you get a 360-degree view that usually allows you to see under tree
branches that would otherwise obstruct  your vision from an elevated stand. l also believe you can do a better job of judging
bears at eye level. Last and maybe not least, mosquitoes and blackflies can be kept to a minimum – the shoot through camouflage
netting on my Matrix model acts as bug netting.”

Final footnote; While bears don’t associate blinds with danger, they are inquisitive creatures and could do some
serious damage if you don’t remove the blind after each day’s hunt.

lf an African safari is on your crosshairs, Butterwick recommends stowing away a  portable blind in your luggage.“A moveable
pop-up blind offers many more options than pits and fixed setups,” he says. “The wind is always shifting, and swapping sides of a
waterhole really increases the odds. Portable  concealment can mean the difference  between no shot and a record-class animal.”

THE ART OF BLINDSIDING:
HOW TO SHOOT

Tod Graham hunts exclusively from ground blinds and has blindsided more than 20
Pope and Young whitetails. Learn from his proven shooting tips;
*Practice drawing your bow inside the blind to gauge how much clearance you need for bow limbs and arrows.
*Always double-check the gap between  the window opening and your sight pins. If you don’t rehearse the draw, you could end up
missing the window and shooting the wall.

Visualize where the shots are most likely to occur; you’ll probably be right more

times than not. Position your chair carefully; Graham likes to shoot at a 45edegree angle to the window.
* Practice shooting arrows out ofa blind, including through the netting, especially if you aren’t used to shooting from a sitting or —
kneeling position.
* Always use a rangefinder if time permits; depth perception is affected by the netting.

For ideal blind placement, avoid a rising and setting sun in your face. Also, setting
up in the shade improves your ability to see through netting.
Use a bow holder, such as the one Double Bull Archery markets, to keep your bow
in a handy position. (You may have to be quicker on the draw from the ground than
from a treestand)
*Practice shooting from inside the blind at different distances, angles and times of
day. Be sure to dress in hunting garb.  The dark interior of a ground blind reduces the amount of light available to your
sight pins. You may need a larger peep and possibly a light (check local regulations).
•Blinds can often accommodate two hunters. Practice together ahead of time to avoid the proverbial Chinese fire drill.

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Published by archerchick on 05 Jan 2011

Calculating Kinetic Energy and Momentum


BOWHUNTING WORLD
October 2006

we receive many questions about figuring kinetic energy and
momentum in arrows. Below is information about the formulas for calculating kinetic energy and momentum, their relationship, and the derivation of these formulas. There are only two basic
formulas: one for kinetic energy and one for momentum, although there are
probably many ways to write them. Each formula has several constants that are required to make them usable in a form where the values are expressed in terms we are familiar with. Conversion to grains for the arrows and from the British gravitational units of poundals to pounds-mass are a part of that.

Determining An Arrow’s
Kinetic Energy
The basic formula for kinetic energy is:

To use the weight of the arrow in grains, Our usual unit of measurement, it is neccessary to convert from poundaIs to grains
in the formuIa, therefore:

Note: The acceleration of gravity
(g) varies with latitude. As latitude increases, “g” also increases. 32.16 feet
per second per second corresponds to about 40 degrees latitude, which is a
reasonably good average for the United States. Gravitational pull is higher at the
poles.

Therefore:

Dimensionally masses are measured
in poundals and velocities in feet per second. A poundal is defined as the
force which, if applied to the standard pound body, would give that body an
acceleration of one foot per second per second. One poundal equals 1 /3 2. 1 740
pound-force (lbf). These dimensions are stated in the British “absolute system” in which the basic dimensional units are: one poundal, one foot, and one second. Therefore, the basic unit of
momentum is one poundal-second.

When momentum is expressed in the British gravitational system (the system in most common use in the United States), the basic unit is one pound-second. One pound-second is equivalent
to 32.1740 poundal-seconds. Work or energy is expressed in foot- pounds in the British “gravitational system,” or as foot-poundals in the British “absolute system.” Again, the acceleration of gravity enters the picture so that: one foot-pound = 32.1740 foot-poundals.

Unfortunately the term “pound” is used ambiguously to define both “force”
and “mass” in most instances. To distinguish between these two usages, the term “pound- force” was coined to apply to the pound when it is used to express force, and the term “pound-mass” was designated to apply to pound when it is used to indicate mass.
Simply stated:
“A load that produces a vertically downward force because of the influence of gravity acting on a mass may be expressed in ‘mass’ units. Any other load is expressed in ‘force’ units.”
The kinetic energy of an arrow in flight is a function of its mass and velocity squared, as shown in the formula outlined above. It has the dimension of foot-pounds. The momentum of the same arrow is also a function of its mass and the single power of its velocity. Momentum
has the dimensions of foot»seconds. The difference between kinetic energy and momentum is a function of the velocity divided by 2 and, of course, the change in dimensions from foot-pounds to
pound-seconds. lf kinetic energy of the arrow is divided by “v/2,” then the result
is the momentum of the arrow. For example: An arrow with a weight of 450 grains and a velocity of 230 feet per second will have a kinetic energy of 52.8718 foot-pounds.
Dividing 230 by 2 yields 115. Dividing
52.8718 by 115 gives a momentum of
0.4598 pound-seconds.

To calculate momentum directly the following formula can be used:
momentum = wav/225120 Ib.-secs. 1
wa is arrow weight in grains {
v is arrow velocity in feet per second. y
For example: An arrow with a weight Y
of 450 grains and a velocity of 230 feet per
y second will have momentum equal to:
450 x 250/225120 = 0.4598 pound-seconds.
To Calculate momentum directly the following formula can be used.

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