Archive for the 'General Archery' Category

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Published by admin on 27 Aug 2012

UPDATE ON MAKING TEXAS AMERICA’S #1 BOWHUNTING STATE

UPDATE ON MAKING TEXAS AMERICA’S #1 BOWHUNTING STATE
by Ted Nugent

A top hunting TV show hostess had the gorgeous trophy buck dead to rights, broadside looking away at 15 yards. She couldn’t draw back her bow.
The #1 gal at the NRA had the big buck in the perfect position for the dumpshot of a lifetime. Couldn’t draw her bow.
Another big bad TV host had put in the hours for the ultimate ambush on a monster whitetail he had been after for years. Grunting and groaning and yanking maniacally with all his might, the bowstring simply wouldn’t come back.
Again this year while rocking across America on tour, more than twenty big strong guys with whom I met backstage to talk hunting and guns and stuff, winced as they struggled to lift their right arms over their heads, complaining how they probably wouldn’t be able to bowhunt this year due to shoulder pain and complications. All of them shoot 70# bows or thereabouts.
Are you kidding me? In 2012 the denial rages on as the vast majority of archery stores in America still have racks full of 70# bows that are much too heavy for 90% of archers, and too heavy and downright worthless for upwards of 99% of wanna be archer/bowhunters to even attempt to draw properly or gracefully or without causing serious shoulder, arm, muscle problems.
Are you kidding me?
I will not give up on fixing this self-inflicted, suicidal policy in my beloved sport of the mystical flight of the arrow.
I am well aware of the army of dedicated bowhunters who are more than happy with their heavy weight bows, and for those who can truly handle them, Godspeed to ya.
But know that amongst you there are many who would be way better off with a drastically reduced draw weight. I have witnessed it time and time again. To the man and woman, they instantly became better archers and much less susceptible to shoulder problems and the curse of quitting.
Again, for the record, Mrs. Nugent, and many, many other successful and pain free bowhunters, kill big deer, hogs, elk, antelope, caribou, bear, moose and all kinds of African planes game including big tough zebra, eland, gemsbok, oryx, waterbuck, wildebeest, kudu, hartebeest and more with bows pulling 35 to 40#.
We have youngsters every year at Sunrize Safaris who cleanly kill hogs and deer with ultra-lightweight bows in the 20# range.
Why this proven fact is so resisted and denied remains one of life’s great mysteries. Meanwhile, the world’s greatest sport fails to grow and the attrition rate goes unabated due to the insanity of the heavy draw bow myth.
Please help me fix this curse, won’t you?
The huge, hard, muscled African Scimitar horn oryx bull turned broadside at twenty yards after a long, patience testing wait. My svelte, dainty, 105 pound wife Shemane effortlessly pulled back the bowstring on her 35# pink Martin bow and sent a 400 grain arrow tipped with a razor sharp two blade broadhead dead square behind its shoulder.
The tenacious beast galloped and bucked madly for forty yards, stopped, turned around once and tipped over stone cold dead about seven seconds later, its lungs sliced to smithereens. Done. It’s over rover. Terminus Eldorado. Goodnight Ellouise. Bye bye baby. The beast is dead, long live the beast.
The big antelope did not have a chronograph in its possession, no kinetic energy meter, and no status quo bureaucrat on call with presumptions to spare.
We celebrated perfect, simple bowhunting by dining on the best dead venison on earth, thank you.
Fact is, no one on earth hears all the horror stories about not being able to find a bow they can shoot gracefully from as many bowhunters or wanna be bowhunters nonstop throughout the year for so many years than I do. Nobody.
I kid you not, for every new bowhunter that survives being sold a too powerful bow and remains a bowhunter there are hundreds and hundreds who give up because they simply don’t enjoy struggling with a heavy bow. Nationally, I am certain that number is in the tens of thousands.
Nah, the archery industry doesn’t want/need any of you wimps who can’t draw 60-70 pound bows. Buy golf clubs.
Are you kidding me?
And horror of horrors, planet earth’s #1 hunting state, Texas, rates dead last in the nation for bowhunters per hunting license sold, and it is all because of the curse described above.
The good news is that Texas is increasing bowhunter numbers at its fastest rate of growth ever, and I am so very glad to report that it is because more and more bowhunting shops are getting better and better at properly setting up bows and also offering slightly reduced draw weight bows. The word is getting out there.
Bottom line is, that I am convinced, that setup correctly with a smooth, graceful weight bow, 90+% of Texas deer hunters will fall in love with bowhunting if they just take their time, demand stealthy gear and put in the necessary practice, which is at least ten times the effort it takes to become proficient with a rifle.
So all you bowhunters out there that get it, please help me spread the goodword. Politely request your favorite bow shop stock lighter weight bows, and encourage the bow humpers out there to reduce their draw weight, and encourage newcomers to go smooth and graceful.
I’m shooting a deadly 48# these days, and the Nugent tribe ain’t eating chicken, I promise you that. Though if I see one, I will shoot it.

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Published by archerchick on 25 Jul 2012

Watching The Woods Change -By Randall Schwalbach

Archery World – October 1987
Watching The Woods Change
By Randall Schwalbach
The freedom of exploring wild places is one of the joys of hunting. There’s nothing like the anticipation of going out of state on the big hunt. New country, new faces, new challenges — that’s what turns on bowhunters like you and me. At the same time, however, many of us enjoy returning to a favorite hunting spot year after year. I enjoy roaming a woodlot in central Wisconsin where I started bowhunting whitetail deer 15 years ago. It has become sort of an annual pilgrimage, and come mid-September my thoughts converge on this chunk of heaven I call the Big Hoods.
The Big Woods
What I find most amazing about the Big Woods is that it is in a state of constant change. Not only does habitat evolution/ alteration affect deer movement on a year to year basis, but also new generations of deer acquire new patterns and survival techniques. In order for you to enjoy continuous success at your own “old faithful ,” I’m going to share some of my experiences with this evolution at my own tried and true Big Woods. Did you ever marvel at how fast a tree grows? Just look out your window at that maple you planted in the backyard when your irst son or daughter was born. Amazing, isn’t it! Now, consider that a tree is useful to deer for different reasons during the course of its life, and you’ll see why no woods can ever stay the same. When it is small, a tree is likely to be either (1) eaten or (2) used as cover – or quite possibly both. Toward the end of its sapling status, it serves as a good place to polish antlers and test brute strength. Between this and the fruit bearing stage, say, if it is an oak, the tree as an individual is not highly useful. The point is, the woods are a collection of many trees, either in a process of growth or death, and as a unit the woods are indeed constantly changing – right before your eyes.
When I first started hunting the Big Woods, the northern edge was well defined. It butted up against a 20 acre farm field that lay fallow and consisted of thick canary grass and tall goldenrod, with a few small aspen and birch scattered through. In the past 15 years, however, the oaks and maples of the Big Woods have grown out into the field, producing a “zone” rather than a strict delineation or “edge.” The deer used to cross the 20 acre field rather quickly to go between cornfields and the woods. They entered the woods at the corners and at a few select points along the edge. The sign they left was concentrated at these entrances. Now the deer actually “live” in the field and in the “zone” created by the advance of the Big Woods. The cover is much thicker and there are many more lanes of safe travel for deer. Individual trails, however, are not as prominent, and the sign is less concentrated. I think there are more deer now, but they make less impact.
How has my hunting strategy changed? For starters, I alarm too many deer if I walk
 through the zone between woods and field, which is where my old walking trail is. I now enter the woods from a different side. Because the deer come into the woods from any point along the north boundary, I now have better luck hunting farther into the woods itself, where main trails are still in use and sign is concentrated. For nostalgic reasons, I sometimes sit in my old stands along the “edge,” but my luck there is seldom good. It is important to understand that the Big Woods itself is used primarily for three things: (1) acorns, (2) a rutting area and (3) a lane for quick travel to a major swamp/bedding ground to the south. As the only major highland in the area, the Big Woods is strategic for the hunter with a discerning eye.
There is an annual adjustment in deer movement directly related to farm crop rotation. Although my woods are not bordered by any tilled land, there are fields in three different directions. The field to the west is 100 yards distant and is always planted in corn. Encompassing a half section of land, the corn planted there often becomes primary escape cover as well as a food lot. In alternate years, roughly, there is corn to the north and to the east, within a quarter to half mile of my woods. Because deer seem to enjoy variety just as much as we like to try out different restaurants, they will travel the extra distance between these fields and my woods. This is in favor of the deer, from a biologist’s point of view, for it decreases social pressure and interaction. From a hunter’s standpoint, deer sign spreads out and hot-spots become less of a factor. The deer are everywhere, and they approach the woods from all sides, complicating the matter of placing a stand, particularly in relation to wind direction.
The availability of natural food supplies also changes from year to year. During the fall, one of the most important deer foods to look for is the acorn, fruit of the oak tree Since one species of oak may produce more acorns than another in a given year, pay attention to the different groves of oak in any one woods. Furthermore, mast producing capabilities of individual trees within a species also vary. (See my article, “Acorn Time ’s the Time” in Archery World August, 1986, for the complete lowdown on oaks and acorns. Differences in food supply, remember, affect not only where the deer eat, but also where they bed and from which direction they approach the woods.
Natural events such as a violent windstorm can change deer patterns dramatically. Several summers ago one storm took more than 100 of our big oaks. The deer had formerly been accustomed to a clear view in the mature timber, which they traveled through at a quick walk. When the trees came down, it gave predators (like me) good places to hide. so the deer had to slow down and move through the area with greater caution. ln effect, this gave them more time to detect my presence.
In many instances, downed trees also obscured my vision, making it harder for me to spot deer approaching favorite stands. My father and I used to love one open glade in the late afternoon as the deer approached through the slanting rays of sunshine. This perennial stand suddenly became a poor hunting locale. It remained that way until we got in there with a chain saw and restored some order to the area. Shortly the deer returned to using their old trails with confidence. A further outcome of the windstorm was the creation of a new hunting strategy for me – the pit blind. In a nutshells, the upturned root end of a windblown oak created a natural hole for a hunter to crawl into. A little improvement with a spade, and I had a first-class blind that put me as close as I’ve ever been to wild deer. For example, six inches between my face and the antlered end of one whitetail buck was CLOSE!
Another kind of evolution that can force a hunter to revise his strategy is a change of land ownership. When my father first purchased the Big Woods in the early 60’s, all the adjacent lands were owned by farmers. As they subsequently sold off of small parcels (split off the big farms) to non-farmers, the result was a loss of hunting grounds for us and a decline in the hunting potential on our own land. One person put an old mobile home smack dab on the edge of our property, ruining one area totally. Another routinely invites more people to hunt his land than he actually has room for, producing the added headache of a trespass problem for us. We have made the necessary adjustments for these changes, however, and fortunately we still have excellent hunting at the Big Woods.
Possibly you are contemplating buying your own land for hunting. The best advice I
have for you is to locate an available parcel adjacent to a large tract of land that is least likely to be split up and sold off in small parcels. By the same token, don’t purchase hunting land with the idea that it will provide instant and easy access to other peoples’ lands. Neighbors may be willing to grant you hunting rights on their land, but don’t assume this. Acquire enough land of your own to provide for your sporting needs.
In addition to habitat evolution, food availability and change of land ownership, there is the possibility of new generations of deer acquiring new habits – that is, adapting new ways to avoid you. I believe that due to wide-spread use, the overall effectiveness of the tree stand has diminished significantly over the past 10 years. When I first started hunting out of trees for deer, the results were fabulous. Most of the stands I used were no more than 10 feet off the ground, and deer were always walking right underneath me. Rare indeed were the occasions the deer looked up out of natural curiosity, even after detecting a strange odor or hearing a sound that was out of place. I used one tree in particular over and over, year after year, with excellent success. Gradually, however, the deer became wise to my strategy, forcing me to become more of a specialist at the arboreal ambush. Indeed, trees were still good places to hide, but the deer were starting to check out the various trees as they went about their business. I learned to pay more attention to camouflaging myself with natural materials and shadows, whereas before I had relied upon sheer elevation.
Also, once the deer spotted me in a tree stand, it seemed to make a larger impact on their memory, and the effectiveness of any given tree stand diminished through usage. Today, I still use tree stands, but I change their locations more frequently, and I generally go much higher – 22 feet is about average. For all purposes, I have abandoned the permanent, wooden platform made of 2×4 lumber in favor of the portable, aluminum stand which I can backpack in and out of the woods. The latter are more effective as they can be put in almost any tree. They also create less of an eyesore when I leave, for I take them with me.
In addition to tree stands, I spend more time these days still-hunting and waiting in ground blinds. The end result of all this is a continuous, intensive scouting program to keep abreast of the natural changes in the woods as well as man-made-alterations. We always think to ourselves, “Wouldn’t it be nice if some things would just stay the same forever?” But the truth is, that old hunting spot of yours is bound to change; it changes a little bit every day. Spend some time revising your bowhunting strategies to suit the new conditions and it will pay you off with the one thing that doesn’t change – the satisfaction of making a kill with the bow and arrow.
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Published by archerchick on 25 Jul 2012

My “Dream” Buck by Michael Henson

Archery World – October 1987

My “Dream” Buck by – Michael Henson

 

Well concealed and silent, the westerner stalked his trophy steadily for more than three hours; like a magnet, it attracted more and more deer. Suddenly, his bowhunting partner appeared and spotted the deer, pulled his bow out of the truck and loosed the perfect arrow.

 

I refocused my rangefinder and looked at  the yardage indicator once again.   “Sixty-two yards. I don’t dare move any closer,” I said to myself. Glancing at my watch, I realized that three hours had gone by since I first spotted this record book mulie. My thoughts quickly faded though as my eyes again were drawn to the bedded-buck’s wide 5×5 rack, still in velvet. It moved periodically as he nibbled at the grass around him and methodically chewed his cud.

“He’s gotta be Pope and Young material ,” I thought. Feeding below this buck was a respectable 4×4, approximately 40 to 50 yards away. He was nice, but definitely not the quality of the bedded, larger one. Occasionally, I would also catch glimpses of a 3×3 and a doe who were also browsing a little further downhill. No matter what else was going on, my attention went quickly back to the big 5×5. What a nice animal! In 20 years of hunting deer, with both rifle and bow, I had never been this close to such a fine buck. This truly was a deer hunter’s “dream come true.” But could it come true for me?

 

 

Fallen Log?

 

This whole dream began in the fall of 1985 after I had moved to Aztec, New Mexico, which is located in the northwestern corner of the state. I relocated there on a job transfer from Minnesota, knowing full well I was leaving excellent whitetail country. However, I knew that I was headed for superb mule deer and elk hunting just north of Aztec, in the San Juan National Forest of southern Colorado. After moving there, it didn’t take long for me to meet the person responsible for my being on this particular mountain — his name — Peter Akins. It seems like the good Lord planned our introduction, so when Peter and I met we found out we talked the same language: archery hunting, specifically, the deer and elk dialect.

 

 

Peter himself, has never shot a big-game animal with a rifle. I don’t think he even owns one. However, with bow and arrow it’s a different story. He rarely fails to fill his elk and deer tags. I think he felt sorry for this Minnesota boy, subsequently inviting me to join him and his brothers, Russell and Mark, for the 1986 hunting season in Colorado. I was able to squeeze in my brother Jim, from back in Silver Bay, Minnesota, who ultimately plays a major role in this story. So now here I am, a little over 30 yards from a bedded-down, big 5×5 mulie.

 

Every time he moves a muscle or turns his head, my pulse quickens. Who would ever think a deer chewing it’s cud could get you so excited! I thought to myself, “Couldn’t I sneak my arrow by those broken trees, partially obscuring his body? This might be my best chance. The wind might change, or simply quit due to an approaching thunderstorm.” But a wee small voice said, “Patience. Just wait — let’s don’t blow it .” So I again relaxed, resting my 65 pound Golden Eagle compound in a small loop on my camouflaged pant leg.

 

Blow it?

I almost had already. Earlier, around 11:00 a.m. I was still hunting back toward camp, where I was to meet Jim for lunch at noon. It was a perfect day. A slight breeze in my face from below, and the aspen leaves overhead making a slight rustling noise in the background. During the preceding night a much needed rain shower made the walking almost noiseless. I had just moved out of some dense, dark spruce and pine trees into an area of open, mature aspen. I was slowly working my way down to a gravel road, where I would quickly walk back to camp. So far, this morning had been unproductive. I had seen neither elk nor deer, so when I looked downhill and saw a horizontal form approximately 100 yards away, I didn’t think too much about it. My first impression was that it was just another fallen log, but was it? There he was. Moving ever so slightly as he browsed on the lush green foliage. What a magnificent rack! My first thought was, “How in the world am I gonna get close enough in this open aspen for a decent shot?”

My problem compounded immediately when I noticed a 4×4 mulie bedded down a short distance away from this big one. He was a little closer and it was much more open for a possible shot. Then the 5×5 decided he wanted to lay down. “Great,” I thought, “two sets of eyes, open cover and considerable distance to make up. Tough odds.” Somehow though, step by step, using my small 8×35 binoculars, watching closely and keeping as many trees between us as possible, I closed to within about 60 yards. That was as close as I could go, and the only shot possible was at the 4×4. Instead of being patient, I attempted a shot, my arrow hitting a tree on the way. WHAM! I just new I had blown it. The deer jumped up, and trotted away. Then they stopped, looked around for what seemed forever and started feeding again. “I can’t believe it! Just be cool, Mike” , I told myself. Both bucks moved slowly away and got almost out of eye contact. Moving slowly in their direction about 40 yards, I realized there were now four deer. Here’s where they apparently picked up the 3×3 and the doe. Now four sets of eyes.
Moving ever so quietly, one step at a time, I was able once more close to about 60 yards. Then it happened again. First the big 5×5, then the 4×4 – they both lay down. By this time I had lost sight of the 3×3 and doe. Apparently, they both moved downhill toward the gravel road about 100 yards below me. After about 10 to 15 minutes, the 4×4 got up and began feeding away from me with the 5×5 still bedded down. This turned out to be the best thing that could have happened. With the 5×5 looking downhill at the other deer’s activity, I was able to move behind the big boy. I continuously checked the distance with my rangefinder just in case I needed a quick shot.
 Two broken trees, bent over almost touching each other, made it difficult to try a shot. I told myself, “Patience, Mike – just wait.” By now a little over three hours had elapsed. Jim, I knew, would be wondering where I was since I hadn’t made it to camp for lunch. What a surprise and shock when the sound of a diesel engine coming, turned out to be Jim driving my truck on the road below. “He must be looking for me,” I thought. “Now what’s he doing?” I couldn’t believe it, but my truck stopped. “There’s no way he can see me up here, and for all he knows, I could be six miles away.”
 I didn’t find out until later but here’s what took place…Driving around the corner, Jim saw the 3×3 buck standing about 10 yards off the mountain road about 75 yards away. Jim stopped the truck, slid over to the passenger side, got out and walked to the back of the truck, opened the topper and got out his Golden Eagle compound. Peeking around the corner of the truck, he couldn’t believe what he saw! The buck was still there trying to figure out what was going on. Guessing the distance at around 75 yards, and knowing he couldn’t get any closer without spooking him, Jim drew back. Releasing his 2117, XX75 arrow, the 140-grain, 4-blade Rocky Mountain broadhead flew perfectly, hitting behind the 3×3 buck’s front shoulder.
He ran 50 yards and then piled up. Now remember, I had no idea what was going on. I couldn’t hear or see anything except my truck way down there. The only thought in my mind was about my deer getting spooked – for both buck’s ears were up, as they looked downhill. Then it happened! Apparently when Jim’s deer took off after being solidly hit, the big 5×5 stood up. Still not knowing what just took place down below, I reacted instinctively and came to full draw. The 5×5 and 4×4 were now standing together, butl still didn’t have a shot because of four aspen. “Come on, make a move. I can’t hold it much longer,” I thought. Then, just as I was about to relax, the 5×5 moved just enough to give me a shot. Shaking as I released my arrow, it went just underneath him! But he didn’t move, and he was still looking downhill. I couldn’t believe it! In one motion I nocked another arrow; came to full draw, and sent my Rocky Mountain broadhead on its way. This time it was perfect.
The arrow hit him solidly behind the front leg, he barely moved. He managed to walk slowly though about 20 yards; then stopped; wobbled and fell; rolling over twice. I couldn’t believe it! But there he was – a trophy of a lifetime. Saying a quick prayer of thanks, I hurried down the mountain to see what Jim was up to. Was he surprised to see me coming! Each of us had quite a story. No way could either of us easily comprehend what had just happened. I didn’t know what he was doing, and he didn’t know what I was doing, nor even where I was. Unbelievable as it was, we both filled our deer tags within about 60 seconds of each other. Somehow, we each helped the other without even realizing it.
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Published by fasst on 28 Jun 2012

Levi Morgan Featured AT Chat!

                                                                Levi Morgan Featured Chat. 6/27/12 9pm EST

 

Bowmaddness–                Hi Levi, Have you archery hunted in PA this year if so have you had any luck?

Levi Morgan– I hunted in Greene county PA this past season with no luck…hunted public ground and it was tough…I killed a good one there a couple years ago though

Double S- Thank you Levi for all the things you do for the great sport of archery. That’s all. pass

Levi Morgan – Man I appreciate that….It’s been good to me

Ghost23– Levi, what is your greatest accomplishment in archery?

Levi Morgan– My greatest accomplishment in archery ……wow….that’s a good ???……It would have to be winning Louisville!

Ohio Mossy Oak– … Ohio Deer harvest numbers and deer/vehicle accidents have been on the decline for multiple years and many hunters are saying they are not seeing the deer they used to, and that herd numbers may be down overall .Not buck numbers, but in general……. I know you hunt and manage land in Ohio. Have you noticed anything of this sort? And how do you feel about increased cost for both Resident an non-resident deer hunters equally, and decreased antlerless bag limits?

Levi Morgan– I definitely feel that deer numbers overall are down in Ohio…but not buck numbers…I think it is due to the liberal rules on doe harvest jumping in the last couple years….I wish the tags wouldn’t go up as well….

PAbowhunter86– Levi, how many shoots do you attend each year?

Levi Morgan– around 15 or 16….its alot but I love competing ….all those are in a 6 month period

SierraMtns– Hey Levi, Any pointers for someone wanting to compete. I have done a couple 3D shoots. There seems like some many different types of competition. How did you get started?

Levi Morgan– I agree and think that there are way too many venues in this sport…..but I would say pick the one that you feel more confident in and the one that you can best practice for!

Levi Morgan– My dad was a huge hunter….and he introduced it to me….

SierraMtns– Cool…thanks

XFBrian– Do swackers really work like they say or is it just tv???

fasst– lol

Levi Morgan– Man if there is one product that I truly believe in…it is swacker I have no issues at all with them…from the design to toughness they are no doubt my favorite bhead….just stay away from the shoulder bone….the only deer I have lost was from a shoulder shot…but if u hit a deer just right in the shoulder with any bhead u r screwed….no need to hit that far forward with that big of a cut

XFBrian                – lmao thanks for your time

XFBrian                – and CONGRATS on the baby

YoungTNArcher– What is the longest shot you have taken at a target? What is your longest shot while hunting?

Levi Morgan–  200 at a target…….I don’t know if I should answer this but oh well…..120 on a mule deer!

Levi Morgan–  thanx xfbrian

YoungTNArcher– Did you hit the mule deer?

Levi Morgan–  Smoked it….but very controlled situation

buckeyeguy2299– BESIDES NAME THAT GAME:)…WHAT IS YOUR FAV HUNTING SHOW ON TV? AND WHAT ABOUT IT DO YOU LIKE?

Levi Morgan – Its Name The Game Jason…lol…and I would say the Drurys stuff…they are awesome hunters and I’ve been watching them since as long as I can remember…I’ve learned alot from them

buckeyeguy2299–  GREAT …….HAVE A GOOD NIGHT BUDDY AND TTYL

ferretboy–  First off, pleasure meeting you again and now my question: Many purists dont consider 3d real archery, we all know that you’re one of the best in the world at that game, how did it feel shutting down the naysayers by having such a huge indoor win and how proud were you to put that one into your vast and growing list of accomplishments? And congratulations on both the Championship and the new baby.

Levi Morgan–  3d is the toughest venue of archery….thats why so many great shooters dont shhow up….u actually have to think and plan…and manage…..and shoot…and judge….Indoors was awesome for me because I never practice that stuff and because people said the only reason I won was because of my yardage….you cant win a 3d on yardage alone

youngbuck98–  oh ok

Levi Morgan–  Indoors are tough because they are so easy everyone can compete…

Levi Morgan-  if that makes sense…lol

youngbuck98–  levi what method do you use to judge yardage?? do you look at the target or go bye the ground

Levi Morgan–  I use a little of both young buck….but mostly target

ferretboy–  total sense, i shoot both and perform better in 3d, for some reason i feel less stress, thank you for the answer

geezer047–  Hey, gonna be hot this weekend if you and Sam need a cold drink of water stop by Koty’s truck. Charlie

Levi Morgan–  Haha…no problem man…I may make Sam stay home in this heat…not good for being 7 months along

hrtlnd164–  Levi, which would you rather have. A 180" buck or another World Championship…(and you can’t say both).

Levi Morgan–  Definitely a 180” buck…easiest one yet…haha

Levi Morgan–  heck a 160

hrtlnd164–  I’m with ya there

ironarcher–  Oh I’m not sure.. ok I guess I didn’t really understand the answer about judging yardage..

ironarcher–  or maybe I missed it haha

Levi Morgan–  I look at the target and study it for detail while taking alot of other things like lighting, terrain, etc. into consideration…if I’m still not confident I will check it with the ground to see if I get something different

ironarcher–  got ya thanks Levi

jrm81–  Who are some the guys that you just flat out enjoy shooting with in 3D and indoors? Also in your opinion, who are some of the up and coming archers that we should keep our eye on?

Levi Morgan–  Guys Like Darrin Christenberry, Nathan Brookes, Danny Mcarthy, Ken Lance, Chance B, and so many I cant name em all…….and a couple up and comers are Garrett Ayresman from WV that kid is awesome…..and Ty Adkins to name a couple….and Jeremy Elliot

masonbanta–  Did you just decide one day to start shooting the Pro stake or did you work your way up to it over the years?

Levi Morgan–  I’ve shot since I was 6 years old and worked my way to a win in the mens open class in the ASA when i was 13…I quit for a couple years and when I came back I was hungry to be the best of the best so I jumped right in

masonbanta–  Thanks Levi and good luck this weekend.

Levi Morgan–  thank u

rdraper_3–  Can’t really think of any questions right now. I’d just like to say congrats to you and Samantha and good luck in Marengo, OH

Levi Morgan–  thanks so much…really appreciate that

scott*devin–  ohh sorry, Levi do you like the Mathews monster series bows?

Levi Morgan–  Yea I do man…I have had my ups a downs with them by my ups have been amazing…..I love them especially for hunting….but I’ve also won 3 Worlds with a monster 7

sugice–  levi, first it is a pleasure to meet you and I really enjoy your show, now what was your most exciting hunt and which state has presented the most challenging hunt of your career and why?

Levi Morgan–  most exciting was the double double droptine from my dads farm in Ohio…no doubt that’s the most exciting hunt of my life…..most challenging is spot and stalk muleys in the Missouri river breaks of Montana….but that’s also one of my fav hunts….

sugice–  thank you, good luck this weekend and congrats to you and Samantha. If you ever get up to Maine look me up, I've got some great hunting land available.

Leviticus–  Awesome…..MOOSE????

sugice–  absolutely!

sugice–  bear and some big bucks

sugice–  got my permit for a bull this October

Levi Morgan–  awesome

20ftup–  you bought it

tarheelmr7–  what target/lighting/terrain scenarios trick you the most? Can you pick one scenario and give a tip on how not to get my butt kicked by the yardage?

Levi Morgan–  Tarheel—-The one that gets me the most is if the lighting isn’t consistent…if its dark the targets look farther and if its bright the targets look closer…..so if it has been overcast all day and I’m calibrated for that, then all of the sudden the sun comes out and the target is bright…if I’m not careful I will shoot him in the knee…lol

Levi Morgan–  …see ya’

fasst–  lol

tarheelmr7–  thanks man. I’m gonna pm you. Hope to see you this weekend

Levi Morgan–  no problem

youngbuck98–  do you think a c4 is a good bow for target shooting or should I go with the apex 8, either one what would be the length on the front and back bar and how many weights to balance it out good, i shoot b-stinger premiere xl bars

Levi Morgan–  29″ draw and under I would go with c4…over that I would go apex 8….both good target bows….I would start with a 30″ front bar with about 4oz and a 12″ back bar with about 13-15oz

fasst–  I am going to run thru the names that haven’t had a chance to ask a question yet, before we double up. Levi only has a few more minutes slated for the chat!

youngbuck98–  ok thanks man,

Levi Morgan–  no problem

3Dblackncamo–  hey levi, what are your goals in 3D archery right now and how do I get you to Big Pine for some local 3D! good luck in metropolis

Levi Morgan–  I want to win shooter of the year for 3 more years in ASA and help make the organizations better…I’m gonna try to make it out at some point i enjoy shooting out there

AdvanTimberLou–  Levi, congrats on winning Louisville, I was there and see what I thought was the word “manimal” on your shooter belt, what is the meaning behind that?

AdvanTimberLou–  It could have been my bad eyes too, you guys shooting inside outs all day was cool to watch! 🙂

Levi Morgan–  Thats a nick name that Greg Poole gave me…he had that quiver made for me….he says im not all human and that I have to be at least half animal…lol…so he calls me the manimal

fasst–  lol

Fortyneck–  Hey Levi, thanks for your time, In your opinion what peep/sight housing/pin size combo is best suited for hunting at longer distances? Also do you have a favorite older model bowhunting bow that stands out with exceptional accuracy and/or shootability for those that can’t afford the absolute latest equipment.

AdvanTimberLou–  After seeing you shoot, you’re not human! Congrats again and congrats on the future addition!

JHENS87–  sounds like poole

Levi Morgan–  I would go with a 1/8 peep and either a .10 or .19 for pin size but if u can see smaller then I would say go for it….and for an older bow I loved the switch backs

GoosebyFLuFLu–  How long do you plan on shooting professionally? Also do you plan on shooting until you no longer are able to or until is no longer is fun? Thanks for taking the time to answer everyone’s questions.

Levi Morgan–  thanks lou

Fortyneck–  Thanks, BTW Manimal…great show

Levi Morgan–  I’m not real sure…I’ve got a little boy on the way and I can already tell that archery is taking a back seat…as it should….I am going to pray about it as time goes on and we will see what the Lord has in store…good question

GoosebyFLuFLu–  Thanks!

fasst–  good answer!

Levi Morgan–  thanks fortyneck

JHENS87–  Whats your hunting setup for whitetails this year? Any sidebar, lens, longer front stab normally seen in target shooting?

Levi Morgan–  I will be running same as usual for me…mr7 with a 15″ front bar and a 10″ back bar…..7 pin CBE tek hunter but no lense….also gonna use the Helium some I like that bow….especially in blinds

JHENS87–  nice, thanks

Levi Morgan–  no problem

NY911–  Levi – not so much a question, but a comment – thanks for taking a stance with the shenanigans at recent tournaments it really shows how you (and the other Pros who spoke up) care for the future of the sport. Your voice alone equals 100 of ours. Keep tearing it up and good luck on the future addition!

Levi Morgan–  Thanks…I want to do all I can to help these orgs out with rules and decisions…there is a small group of us pros that are starting to work together to get things changed for the better..

Wazz13– Outside of your Pro Hunter’s, what would be your go to arrow for hunting? What would be you goto arrow for 3D?

Levi Morgan–  I would go with a velocity 300 for hunting and TRiple xxxs for 3d

Wazz13                –   Thanks Levi, best of luck and God bless.

archerdad–  nothing just here to observe… congratulations on your good fortune levi the baby and the winnings

Levi Morgan–  thanks guys

hitman846–  In your travels, have you ever had a fan or someone you don’t know tell you “Dude, you should hunt with me for a few days at my place” and took them up on it?

Levi Morgan–  yes and no…not really that spur of the moment but I have had people email me with an idea for a hunt and within the month i was there…not to say I wouldn’t if the circumstance was right….haha

hoytbullrider–  Whats your best advice for a younger shooter , like myself, to get into 3d and indoor when only having a hunting rig (mathews monster) competition against the guys with bows setup just for 3D/indoor , sorry if its a wild question

Levi Morgan–  that’s a good question….I wouldn’t be scared to take my hunting rig to a tournament….that bow doesn’t know its not a tournament bow….while its probably a little more critical and maybe slower and doesn’t have all the bells and whistles it will more than likely still shoot awesome….just think of it this way…if you can beat them with a hunting set up then imagine what u could do with a tourney rig…..

Ohio Mossy Oak–  I wouldn’t mind getting in a follow up if he has time. Or maybe I can just hit him up on facebook?

hoytbullrider–  thanks

Ohio Mossy Oak–  On my last question regarding Ohio deer an tags etc. Did you say you’re in favor of a reasonable increase in cost for Residents an non-resident deer hunters?

Ohio Mossy Oak–  Also..I feel if you own over 50acres even as a non res you should pay less being a property owner…Just wanted to say that

Levi Morgan–  I obviously would rather the price not go up when I think of myself….but if the state is using the money to put back into conservation then a little raise would be ok with me….I agree with u on the landowner thing…I’ve been saying that for years…haha

 Levi Morgan–  not that it matters to them what I think

GoosebyFLuFLu–  Before I leave I wanted to thank you again for taking the time to answer my question and others as well.

Mathews122–  Levi do you have any idea what would be the best 3d tournament bow for a person witha 26 in draw

Levi Morgan–  no problem man. I wish we were all in a room so I could answer in more detail

Levi Morgan–  id say Mathews prestige

Ghost23–  What has been the best archery advice given to you, and how did it affect you as an archer:?

fasst–  OK Folks, let’s all give Levi a big hand for taking the time to host this chat!

JHENS87–  Yep thanks again Levi, been a very good chat

Mathews122–  Thank you

Christopher67–  Thank You

hoytbullrider–  thanks

Double S–  A Big thank you Levi!.

geezer047–  THANKS Levi, see you this weekend. Charlie

PAbowhunter86–  Thank Levi Congrats on becoming a dad no feeling in the world can compare!

20ftup–  Thanks Levi stay cool

fasst–  And Levi, please be sure to tell Greg that I was serious in my last text to him a little while ago!…..lmao

fasst–  levi, can you answer one last question for us please?

Levi Morgan–  Thanks guys I really enjoyed the questions

Levi Morgan–  yes sir

fasst–  go for it Ray

ferretboy–  Thanks a lot Levi Morgan

JHENS87–  Good luck, and try to avoid this 100degree heat your coming into as much as possible haha

rdraper_3–  What would you like to see improve in the IBO? I’d personally like to see the Pro’s shooting on the SAME courses as those in lower classes. I’ve only been in it for 2 years and really like it and plan on going to MBO next year, I’m currently in MBR but the only thing stopping me is the whole adjustable sight thing. I’m deathly afraid I’d forget to adjust it and miss a target.

Ohio Mossy Oak– Thanks alot levi. Getting insight on the deer herd here, from a highly managed ohio land owner like yourself means alot..An re-affirms many takes on the deer herd…Good luck this weekend. And god bless your an yours<

zakseppala– what would be the one tip you would give for someone looking to improve their shooting

rdraper_3-  Thanks for letting me get it in there Travis

Levi Morgan–  O wow ray?…thats a long list…lets see….pros shoot on sight….a legit awards ceremony….a qualification to get ur pro card….a shoot off….20 targets per day….a speed limit….etc etc etc

Levi Morgan–  Thanks guys and good night

rdraper_3–  Thanks Levi

Ohio Mossy Oak–  Speed limit !! YES! I love it

archerdad–  thanks for your time levi

Christopher67–  Thanks Levi

AdvanTimberLou–  Thanks again Levi and all the shooter of the year titles won’t mean a thing when you become the title of dad! Enjoy every moment of it! God Bless you and Samantha!

ferretboy–  Another class act, I have really enjoyed the last two featured chats

 

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Published by Laporte Archery on 09 Jun 2012

2012 Laporte Archery “Bow-Trap” US Demo Tour From June to August

Laporte Archery would like to introduce you to a new archery sport; the Bow-Trap!

We are organizing an introductory tour in the states of Virginia,West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North & South Carolina from June to August with a possible extension to September.

 

You can request from us a free initiation day for your Archery club or shop by email or by phone.

You will find bellow some YouTube video links.

The Archery Trap is unique and extraordinary! This is the first automatic trap in the world capable of offering aerial and moving targets.The machine is called the Phoenix and is designed for fun and competition.The Game is called Bow Trap and can be enjoyed by all ages and abilities.The Rules can be as creative or as formal as the occasion demands.

 

The initial market response has been remarkable and is proving that this is the most exciting new development in Archery for decades, as it offers a whole new dimension to the sport.

 

Archery and clay shooting make compelling partners, with Archery able to offer the following:

 

Ø  A totally environmentally friendly activity – the targets are non-toxic and re-usable and the arrows are easily collected after.

There is no noise, no pollution and no permission required. 

Ø  The machine can be set-up in 5 minutes, enjoyed for hours and then packed away without leaving any trace of having been on-site

Ø  Bow Trap is suitable for all ages and abilities and will attract a whole new client base

Ø  Can be enjoyed indoors,outdoors or at night under floodlights

Ø  Offers the ideal activity to accompany Summer Barbecue’s

Ø  As you already have the infrastructure and suitable land, your investment is restricted to the machine and archery accessories only.

Ø  With the Laporte Safety Arrow (available for indoor and outdoor use), the sport becomes completely safe for everyone to enjoy.

The machines are simple in design, user friendly and safe to operate. They are portable with a 12V battery that can launch 5000 targets with a single charge.

It offers a range of trajectories to suit all archers from beginners to professionals.

The Targets are available in 13in and 10in diameter and are re-usable with each target capable of withstanding over 500 strikes with the Flu Flu arrows and indefinitely with the Safety Arrow.

Targets are waterproof and washable. They are orange in colour, making them suitable for all backgrounds and television.

 

The target density is designed to stop Flu Flu arrows and allow for easy extraction. Bows that can be used include Long, Recurve and Compound bow with draw weights of up to 50 lb.

 

The machine comes with a 2 Year Guarantee.

 

The Phoenix is available as a complete “Ready to Start” Package – including targets, bows, arrows and arm protectors. This offers the added commercial benefit of hiring out the equipment.

The return on investment for the Phoenix is very attractive and expected to be inside 6 months.

 

Wherever the Archery Trap is being used you can hear the laughter, see the enjoyment, feel the pleasure and sense the spirit of competition between the participants.

What better environment can you create for your customers?

 

Please go to the following links to see the videos of the machine.

 

-Events: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBdVsFq3lIY

-Indoor Archeryhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K82gRPYM6C0

-Laporte Trap Demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5na-ICHj1vg

The Phoenix Trap Presentation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p14bsKRK_3c

X-Tests: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXU3nP0tj4E

 

Best Regards,

 

Alain Cluber

Laporte Archery Representative for the USA

Office USA : 1 (276) 644 0094

Email : alain@laporteamerica.com

Website : www.laporte-archery.com

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Published by mlgunkel on 05 Jun 2012

Distance Compensating Bow Site

I am a math teacher in a small high school in Alaska and we began exploring a concept this year for an idea I had a while back.  The general thought is – if you make a laser site and have it mounted above the arrow can you align it to approximate the trajectory of the arrow?  If you can, how far would it approximate that trajectory?  We took that idea a step further and said, if we add a second laser to start approximating the trajectory where the first one leaves off we can really extend the range of the site.  In fact multiple lasers could be used to approximate the trajectory as far out as desired.  Multiple lasers would project multiple dots on the target but the lowest dot would always be the one to use.

We did in fact develop the theory behind this and built a working prototype.  It works.  The students won best of show at the local school wide district science fair.

It only took two lasers to approximate the trajectory on a Bowtech Allegiance out to 50 yards with a maximum 2″ of error.  The following video is of us testing the site shortly after we set it up.  The first clip show 5 shots at random distances out to 50 yards and the second clip shows popping balloons at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 yards on a bright sunny day.

If you are interested in the theory behind the development we established the following procedure:

This procedure includes a fair bit of math – that was of particular interest to me as a teacher using this as a learning project – but this can be automated with the computer and the initial setup of this site is actually quite simple, fast and effective.

Procedure

Since the flight of an arrow follows a decaying parabola, its trajectory can be approximated with a quadratic equation in the form of y=ax2+bx+c where y=drop and x=distance from the target.

  1. Record arrow drop from three distances covering the effective range of the bow by shooting groups of arrows from each distance and recording average arrow drop from aim point.
  2. Create three different equations using the known x and y values, with x=distance from target and y=arrow drop from aim point.

Y1=ax12+bx1+c

Y2= ax22+bx2+c

Y3= ax32+bx3+c

  1. Solve for the unknowns: a, b and c.  Do this by using a graphing calculator and setting the numbers up into a matrix and transforming the matrix to reduced row echelon form.
  2. Once coefficients a, b and c are solved for they can be plugged into the quadratic equation ax2+bx+c.  This will create the quadratic equation that predicts the arrow trajectory.
  3. Use Excel and the quadratic equation to graph the predicted arrow trajectory.
  4. Once graphed, use lines of best fit over different ranges to follow the trajectory of the arrow with an acceptable margin of error. Ultimately, these will be the lasers.
  5. By using multiple lasers, or lines of best fit, we should be able to approximate arrow trajectory out to the effective range of the bow. Multiple lasers will project multiple dots on the target, but the bottom laser dot will always be the approximating arrow trajectory.
  6. Construct a laser mounting apparatus that can be mounted onto a bow and which allows lasers be adjusted in elevation as well as fine tuned left, right, up or down. This laser mount must be rigid enough to maintain its position on the bow while sustaining the shock of repeated shots.
  7. Take the first line of best fit and find the equation of the line in slope-intercept form. B, or the y-intercept, will be the distance between the laser and the arrow.  Mount the laser at this distance above the arrow.
  8. The line of best fit will cross paths with the arrow trajectory at two places on the parabola.  Solve for the x values, or distances, where this occurs by setting the equation for the line of best fit and the quadratic arrow trajectory equation equal to each other and solve for x.
  9. Site the first laser in at the previously solved for x values by shooting a group of arrows at the two distances and adjusting the laser accordingly. After this step your bow should be striking your aiming point at the two distances.
  10. The next laser can be aligned without shooting the bow at all.  The two lasers will cross at a specific distance. This distance can be solved for by setting the equations of the lines of best fit equal to each other and solving for x.  Simply adjust the top laser so it is on top of the previous laser. Ultimately, at these two distances you will see only one dot.
  11. Repeat the previous step to align any additional lasers.

Now you can test-shoot the bow from essentially any distance that your bow is effective to and see if the lasers allow you to shoot within the predicted margin of error at these distances.

The following is the actual implementation of the procedure on the test bow (Bowtech Allegiance) with the real numbers and generated formulas.

Step 1: Record Arrow Drop.

 

Distance from Target Arrow Drop (Inches)
Group 1 15 Feet or 5 Yards 0.4375 Inches
Group 2 60 Feet or 10 Yards -5.3125 Inches
Group 3 150 Feet or 15 Yards -46.8125 Inches

 

Step 2: Create Equations.

 

0.4375=a(32400)+b(180)+c

-5.3125=a(518400)+b(720)+c

-46.8125=a(32400000+b(1800)+c

 

Step 3: Using spreadsheet program utilizing rref solve for a, b and c.

 

a= -0.0000171467764060

b= 0.00478395061728

c= 0.1319444444444440

 

Step 4: The quadratic equation predicting arrow trajectory is:

 

-0.0000171467764060x2+0.00478395061728x+0.1319444444444440

 

Step 5: Use Excel to make a graph of projected arrow trajectory using the previously found quadratic formula.

Step 6: By graphing trajectory over shorter distance ranges and using line of best fit on Excel, we were able to come up with a combination of two lines of best fit that approximates the projected arrow trajectory from zero out to 50 yards with an error of + or – 2 inches.

First Line of Best Fit:

 Second Line of Best Fit:

 Step 7: We were able to use 2 lasers and have a margin of error of 2 inches and were able to approximate an arrow strike point out to 50 yards. The top laser mount location is 25 inches above the arrow.  With a top laser mount of 33 inches we, we were able to approximate arrow strike point out to 60 yards.

 

Step 8: We chose 1 inch extruded aluminum display rail since it was readily available, rigid, lightweight and laser fixtures could be mounted anywhere along its length. This was mounted to the bow utilizing the bow’s standard site mounting holes.

 

We modified a generic green laser pointer to use as our laser sites. To allow for windage and elevation adjustment of lasers we mounted one end of the laser on a horizontal threaded bolt and the other end of the laser on a vertical threaded bolt in an aluminum square tube.

 

For our power source we made a battery pack using standard plumbing supplies and screwing it into the stabilizer-mounting hole on the bow. The bow was used as the ground and we routed one positive wire through a momentary push-button switch on the bow handle up to each laser.

 

The lasers were mounted onto the bolts by soldering a nut onto a ½ inch copper pex crimp fitting and crimping it onto the laser.

 

Step 9: The equation for the first laser line is y=-0.0137x+4.028.  The laser should be mounted at four inches above the arrow.  Mount second laser at 25 inches above the arrow, the equation for this laser is y=-0.0384x+25.132.

 

y-intercept=4.028=distance laser is mounted above the arrow.

 

y-intercept=25.132=distance laser is mounted above the arrow.

 

Step 10: Find where the first laser crosses at both places on the parabola.  See below.

Step 11: We adjusted the laser fairly close at 8.7 yards and then adjusted it to be right on at the next distance: 21.2 yards.  A quick check showed that the laser was right on at 8.7 yards as well.

 

Step 12: We solved for the distance that the laser crossed.  See Below.

 

We then aligned the lasers as to make one solid dot at 23.7 yards.

 

Step 13: There were no additional lasers.

 

Step 14: We tested the site by shooting arrows at random distances out to 50 yards, and all the arrows were within the predicted margin of error (+ or – 2 inches in elevation). See video. Further testing was done to demonstrate both the accuracy of the site out to 50 yards and the visibility of the green laser on a bright sunny day by shooting balloons at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 yards. See video.

 

I would certainly like our students to receive feedback on your thoughts about this concept.  We did file a provisional patent on the idea.  I can be contacted at mlgunkel@gmail.com

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Published by admin on 21 May 2012

PREPARE YOUR HUNT NOW by Ted Nugent

PREPARE YOUR HUNT NOW by Ted Nugent

Once we got the foodplots in, we took down more than forty treestands and goundblinds all across our sacred hunting grounds. Springtime isn’t just about house cleaning, turkey and bear hunting and planting crops, and in my case, greasing up the rock-n-roll machinery for a new year’s full throttle rockout, it is also about maintenance and getting a jumpstart on September even before summer rolls around.
We have found over the last fifty plus years of hardcore hunting, that quality control is always way easier, effective, and much safer than damage control. Even if we didn’t guide hundreds of hunters each season and just managed all our hunting for ourselves, there are some very simple, pragmatic basics that will vastly increase the ease and quality of our upcoming hunts with just a little bit of forethought and adequate elbow grease.
We like to take down all our treestands each spring so we can examine the chains and straps and ratchets to be sure everything is in tip top safe, quiet working order. We have all seen how chains grow into trees and straps deteriorate over time, making for some very dangerous, life threatening conditions that there is simply no excuse for.
Plus, I have to tell you; even the slightest change of location for that old stand will greatly benefit our ambush effectiveness come fall. I have found that by moving even a few short yards, critters are far less likely to nail us, and I crave every minute advantage I can squeeze out of my stand location.
A little lube goes a long way on hinges and nuts and bolts. Also by disconnecting a stand from the tree, the chance of squeaks and game alerting little noises can be eliminated. Do it.
We wipe down our Double Bull Blinds to eliminate any corrosive mildew or mold, then make sure they are bone dry before storing them in a dry, protected area.
Sometimes a little heavy duty needle and thread work will suture up some rips and tears, fortifying our pop-up blinds for a more cozy hide-away.
Where legal, now is the time to put out those mineral licks and supplemental nutritional attractants that will keep the critters coming all summer long.
Primos Swamp Donkey blocks, Red Spot mineral bags and apple and corn flavored salt blocks have worked wonders for our MI and TX properties. My buddies around the country have shared the same glowing reports as well.
Raking small clearings and finding such natural clearings in the woods or along edges are great places to broadcast WildGame Innovations Throw and Grow seed, or a homemade concoction of rye, wheat, oats, clovers and alfalfa blends to enhance game areas during the off season. It is always amazing to watch my little pockets of emerald green deer heaven spots take shape as time goes by.
As much as I crave my hunting time, I must admit that I get nearly the same kick out of doing all these different activities in my hunting areas in between seasons. I always find sheds, the occasional mushroom, leaks, wild asparagus, wild berries and wild scallions while doing this fun outdoor work, making for a great day afield everytime. And the kids and grandkids love every minute of it too.
Don’t wait till the end of summer to scramble, do it as far in advance as possible so it can all be accomplished with no rushing around.
And remember too, that groundblinds and treestands should be set back up a good month or so before opening day so that the critters get acclimated to these foreign objects way in advance. It is also beneficial to do so well in advance so we don’t intrude on our hunting areas any more than necessary too close to opening day.
And don’t forget those scent stations. I discovered long ago that mock scrapes have a very positive effect when kept going all year long. And I have also found that it doesn’t matter what kind of deer scent I use. Doe, buck, estrus, doe in heat, dominant buck, fresh, old, natural or synthetic, by keeping a scent station stinky all year, it seems like every deer in the area just has to stop by for a sniff, a rub and a pee. The consistent familiar scent seems to calm them down and give them confidence that all is well.
The exploding phenomena of trail cameras has been an eye opener to all hunters, and if you got em, use em. I’m not a nut about them, but I do set them up here and there occasionally to see what is going on and it is always fascinating to view the critters that frequent my favorite hunting spots when I’m not there.
Stretch that spirit we all so crave as long as possible. Scouting and familiarizing ourselves with our sacred hunting grounds has always been a big part of the hunting lifestyle for everyone I know, so get out of it all we can to maximize the joys we derive from our wild time. The only thing better than wild time is more wild time.

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Published by Casey Stutzman on 17 May 2012

Real Fitness for Bow Hunters

Here are some great additions you can make to your workout routine to keep your most deadly weapon in tune and ensure it is ready to perform during the moment of truth.

 

Choose athletic exercises

 

Simple or single joint exercises do not teach the body how to move better.  Hunters are athletes and need to train as such, choose exercises that have multiple joints moving simultaneously and require focus and concentration to perform.For example a bicep curl is very will not help a hunter move better, an exercise like a squat & row on a TRX suspension trainer or with a resistance band will have much more value.

 

·        Resistance band squat row

 

o  Loop a resistance band around a stationary object and grab both handles.  Begin standing facing the anchor point with your elbows driven back and your wrists touching the lower portion or your ribs.  Simultaneously squat and reach your arms towards the anchor point until they are straight then stand and return to the row position.  8-12 reps

 

Balance training

 

Simple balance training will challenge your nervous system and strengthen your brains ability to communicate with your muscles which will have a direct positive effect on your reaction time and reflexes.  Another added bonus is you gain better body awareness and control makes your shot routine more consistent and effective.

 

Balance training exercises;

 

·        Simple – single leg balance with eyes closed

 

o  Stand on one leg in an athletic stance and close your eyes.  Stand on a BOSU balance trainer or other unstable surface to increase the level of challenge.  Hold on each leg for 20-30 seconds, this is a great exercise to do between strength or conditioning sets as active recovery.

 

·        Advanced – Lateral bounds with stick holds

 

o  Start on your right leg and explosively bound to your left landing on your left leg covering as much distance as possible.  After landing on the left hold for 2-3 seconds trying to maintain your balance before going back to the right.  Do 8-12 reps

 

Core stability

 

we often think of shoulder strength and core stability as two different things, fact is that they are very interconnected; a stable core equals a stronger shoulders

 

Core stability Exercises;

 

·        Simple – 10 second Planks

 

o  A plank is holding a push up position.  Perform short intense 10 second reps with 3-5 sec rest between.  Make sure your toes are pulled towards your shins, your quads (front of legs) are tight, glutes (butt muscles) are tight, abs are braced (like you are about to take a punch) and shoulders are tucked back and down (towards your back pockets)

 

·        Advanced – Bird Dogs

 

o  Begin in the plank position on your elbows. Keeping the body as stable as possible lift your right arm and left leg a few inches off the ground and hold 1-2 seconds.  Return back to the start and repeat on the other side.For a greater challenge begin with a plank on the hands.  Do 8-12 reps

 

 

Cardio target shooting

 

Next time you are out at the range take a jump rope or hit up some jumping jacks for 45-60 seconds right before shooting a couple groupings.  This will elevate your heart rate and force you to get it and your breathing under control before you shoot.  This will help mimic that excited state most hunters get when they see a deer and will improve your accuracy in those situations.  It will also help strengthen your shot process by making you really concentrate on your breathing in your pre shot routine.  Bow hunters are often also pressed for time; this is a great way to stay up on your fitness while still getting in time to prepare with your bow for the season.  I also like to hold plank positions before shooting or before I start my jump roping.  This will tire out my shoulders and core, at first it might have a negative effect on your accuracy but after a while you will find that you are more sold and stable in full draw and are able to hold the position much longer without shaking.

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Published by Casey Stutzman on 17 May 2012

What should a Bow Hunter look for in Gyms of Fitness Programs

If you are a serious bow hunter than you are serious about your fitness (if not see artice on “why athletes make better bowhunters”).  Whether you are just getting into fitness to improve your hunting skills or you are looking get the most out of your current workout program, here are a couple simple suggestions to steer you in the right direction.  There are TONS of fitness offerings, finding the ones that can be the most beneficial for hunters can sometimes be tricky, use these suggestions below to find what is right for you.

·         All the skills we talked about don’t happen by sitting on machines, find workouts that take place standing and allow participants to “move in space”.  Bow hunters should be looking for more functional fitness offerings, which should not be hard since that is the new buzz in the fitness industry.  Look for places that offer things like TRX, Rip trainer, work with resistance tubes, BOSU balance trainers, medicine balls and performance/athletic training.  I am a huge fan of Kettlebells but make sure you find a place that offers a progressive program for various levels.  Kettlebells are wonderful but are a skill in themselves and take time to master.  I am not a huge fan for Crossfit but feel it can be beneficial for bow hunters if you are able to hook up with a good Crossfit trainer.  Be very careful picking a Crossfit gym, to find the right one for you do your homework and talk to people in your area. Many of the popular Crossfit exercises and workouts require mastery of some basic skills before attempting; when you turn 16 you don’t hit the track at Daytona right after getting your license, find a location that has a progressive system for getting new members involved.   Look for a Crossfit gym that does not have beginners doing any Olympic lifting and encourages short strength workouts and rest days not just met cons day after day.

·         If you are already active take your training to the next level by getting off the machines and incorporating exercises on items like the BOSU balance trainer and TRX suspension trainer into your workout, you can find great TRX trainers and gyms at www.trxdirectory.com  Try doing your cardio by running or bike riding outside for some new variety.   Participating in more performance based workouts will help you increase your athletic machine and vastly improve your bow hunting.  These workout are also fun and very engaging making time at the gym very enjoyable.  A simple way to do this on your own is adding reaction components into your exercises. To find a great local performance trainer look for professionals that hold a Combine360 certification you can find them at www.combine360.com

·         Look into myofascial release techniques to help improve posture and recover from long and numerous sits in the stand.  Lots of personal training studios and specialty fitness business are now offering classes and sessions on the foam roller, some even offer body work by trained professionals.  This is also something you can do on your own where ever you choose to workout but it will take some research.  One of my favorite companies that deliver great MFR products and education for athletes is Trigger Point Therapy www.tptherapy.com

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Published by admin on 01 May 2012

Ignorance of the Law is No Excuse

by Ted Nugent

Not a day goes by where an American outdoorsman doesn’t confide in me that due to the increasingly complex, illogical hunting and fishing regulations across the nation, that it would not surprise them that they have unintentionally violated a game law at some point in time. Other outdoorsmen routinely express their frustration about regulations that serve no purpose and cannot possibly be explained in terms of wildlife management.

America is increasingly drowning in just such strange, goofy regulations and requirements. As logic crusader John Stossel recently exposed, our federal government releases roughly 80,000 pages of new regulations each year–confusing, ambiguous, weird illogical regulations that serve no meaningful purpose other than to feebly attempt to justify bureaucracies already off the rails. It’s way past bizarre.

The “you don’t need to read it, you just need to sign it” health care bill argued before the Supreme Court was almost 2,000 pages long of extraordinarily complex rules and regulations. Sarcastically, Supreme Court Justice Scalia stated that reading the bill was a violation of the 8th Amendment’s cruel and unusual punishment clause.

Regrettably, state hunting regulations have also been ravaged by the over-regulation beast. In Alaska, the hunting regulation book is 128 pages long. The Alaska trapping regulation is 48 pages.

Alaska is not alone. Numerous other states have seen incredible expansion of their hunting regulations over the past few decades. In Texas, the summary of hunting and fishing regulations is 85 pages. The hunting regulations in California are roughly 140 pages long.

Even with an increasing mountain of often confusing and complex hunting and fishing regulations to abide by, sportsmen have a legal and ethical obligation to know and abide by these regulations, no matter how goofy they may be. I have said this for decades and will continue to do so as we fight to make them sensible.

I have hunted in Alaska for almost 40 years. It is a spectacular, beautiful place that offers incredible big and small game hunting cherished by sporters from around the globe.

In 2009, I returned again with my sons to Alaska to hunt black bear. What I was unaware of is that the specific region where I hunted had a new and unprecedented requirement that a bear hunting tag was considered to be “filled” even with a non-lethal hit on the animal. For sixty years, every “tag” regulation in every state and Canadian province has declared that you tag the animal upon taking possession of the animal.

The first arrow I shot on that hunt was obviously a non-lethal shot where the arrow literally glanced off the animal’s rib, as seen clearly on stop action video. The bear leapt, stopped, looked around, and slowly ambled off, confused but unhurt by the disruption. After diligent effort by my son and me, we were convinced that this bear was alive and well. We then continued our hunt and ultimately killed a beautiful black bear.

I filmed the entire hunt including the first non-lethal arrow and put it on my television program Spirit of the Wild on Outdoor Channel for tens of millions of viewers to witness. Airing the hunt on television proves beyond all doubt that I had no willful intention to violate any hunting regulation.

Was I negligent in not knowing the Alaska bear hunting rule for the specific region I hunted that year? Absolutely. For my negligence, I have been charged with a violation and I pled guilty. To the best of my knowledge, I am the only person ever charged with violating this new, unheard of law. Lifetime AK hunters, guides, outfitters, even the resident judge at my hearing were unaware of such an unprecedented regulation.

While I disagree with Alaska’s requirement that a tag is considered to be “filled” even on a non-lethal hit, that was the requirement at the time of my hunt. Had I known of that requirement, I would not have hunted that region because I fundamentally disagree with it, and I certainly would not have hunted another bear.

I have promoted the grand, honorable hunting lifestyle all of my life and will continue to do so. Hunting, fishing and trapping are the epitome of true conservation.

What I also pledge to American outdoorsmen is to work to repeal onerous, unscientific, counterproductive rules and regulations that make no sense such as the seven states where hunting is banned on Sunday, making 50% of the season illegal for the average hunting families in those states. Idiotic laws such as these are a hindrance to real conservation and the critical need for recruiting new hunters. Such arbitrary laws serve no scientific purpose that benefits the management of wildlife value whatsoever.

The outdoor lifestyle cannot be preserved for future generations of sportsmen by constructing such a labyrinth of confusing, unscientific and oftentimes counterproductive regulations and rules. Reversing this trend is my focus.

While I have never intentionally violated a hunting regulation, ignorance of the law is no excuse, and I am truly sorry, and have paid dearly. There is even less of an excuse for ignorant laws.

 

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