Archive for the 'Featured Articles' Category

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Published by KurtD on 28 Feb 2012

Hot Spot Outfitter Spotlight

  

 

 

Hot Spot Outfitter Spotlight– Kansas’s Blue River Whitetails

 

In today’s outfitter swindling of get rich quick mentality coupled with amplifying quantity versus quality has forged a weld on the wallet of several thousand hard working hunters in search for a legitimate deer operation to spend their well-earned dollars. With outfitters sprouting from every nook and cranny of the country – it’s time to separate the wheat from the chaff.

In these difficult economic times we face – hunters looking to find an operation that provides one-on-one attention, reasonable expectations, and a proven track record is an absolute necessity before even entertaining cutting a deposit. I firmly believe that as a “client,” there should be virtually no room for shards of doubt or speculation in the booking process. At the very same token – you cannot expect a 150” buck served to you on a silver platter, that’s just not realistic when hunting free range whitetails. At the end of the day, you must find an operation that is not only genuine, but works with you to provide a fair opportunity to fill your tag and conquer your dream.

My hope is to help guide you in the right direction before throwing your greenbacks into the flames. I want to set the record straight and speak for every hunter in the country stashing their savings for a hunt this fall and give a few outfitters a well-deserved shout out for their relentless ability to deliver incredible hunts year-after-year.

 

BLUE RIVER WHITETAILS

 

I’ve had the great opportunity to hunt at a place that has not only proved successful for me the last five years, but currently maintains a 100% turkey slaying record and a world-class whitetail rate that’s very near. The birds are plentiful, landscape’s spectacular, and the privilege to hunt side-by-side with a hunting guru is truly a blessing.

My Kansas go-to-guy is David Schotte, owner of Blue River Whitetails. Schotte runs a superb family oriented operation and has been doing a successful job putting his clients on both species year-after-year.

Schotte relies on Moultrie trail cam pictures to scarf big buck activity and insight. As we all know, trail cameras significantly reduce hunter error and keep human pressure and activity at the extreme minimum. This is exactly how Blue River Whitetails is able to provide their big buck hunting clients an unheard of, 70% success rate with a 150” average!

The time and efforts Schotte put toward planting food plots, installing waterholes, building brush blinds, and strategically placing cameras all boiled down to that very moment; his clients grinning behind a set of gnarly antlers.

There truly is no greater feeling than the gift of accomplishment coupled with the fruitful passion of the outdoors. Together, they are a winning combination that defines the pinnacle of a hunter’s success. The fond memories of bonding with great company and waking up to a buffet of wild game is a dream come true.

If you are in search of a place to hunt spring turkey or fall deer; look no further than Blue River Whitetails!

 

 

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Published by KurtD on 27 Feb 2012

Straight Shot with Frank Addington, Jr.

 

Straight Shot

with Frank Addington, Jr. First Shot Streak Continues at the Renfro’s

Indiana Deer, Turkey and Waterfowl Expo
Who would have guessed that 58 years ago when Harry Renfro started a sports show that it would continue to grow to this day and reach 650,000′ of exhibition space in six big buildings at the Indiana State Fair Grounds?   This show is easily one of the country’s premier sports shows.  About 15 years ago, they added the “Indiana Deer, Turkey and Waterfowl Expo” to the already successful Ford Indianapolis Boat, Sport and Travel Show.  The main sports show runs ten days and the Deer, Turkey and Waterfowl Expo runs for three of those days.  For one ticket, people can walk through the entire show.

Today Kevin Renfro, his family and staff run a great show.  I am sure Kevin’s father Harry would be proud.  Archery Hall of Fame member Ann Clark used to do her archery exhibition at this event and I think it’s always cool to follow in her footsteps at some of these older, well established shows.  There aren’t alot of the old sports show families still around… I do shows for the Halls, the Cenaikos, and the Renfros and maybe a few others.  But most of the old family shows have been purchased or no longer exist.

What impresses me about the Renfro show is the new Quiet Sports part of the show.  They have canoes, kayaks, mountain bikes, tents, and basically anything without a motor relating to the outdoors.  It’s a beautiful part of the show.  I did some media in the Quiet Sports room and really enjoyed seeing all the booths.   I also admired a Canadian cabin scene complete with water and trees built in the tourism part of the show.  It was awesome.

The Deer, Turkey and Waterfowl Expo was packed all three days.  Saturday you could barely walk the isles.  The exhibitors were all busy and everyone looked content to be at a sports show on a February afternoon.  I did two TV media interviews at the show and five exhibitions on the huge new mainstage.  They called the stage the Big Tine Hunting Seminar Stage.  It was showcased in the middle of the show floor and attracted big crowds at every show.

I had five different assistant’s at the five shows I did.  I joked with the audience that there was no way I could be a trick shooter having that many different assistants.  Saturday evening’s show felt great.   I remember the three baby aspirin shot– I hit it first try.  Then I followed that up with another first shot on the three mustard seeds/three arrows!  That was a great way to highlight a busy day.

Sunday’s show was special.  A medically retired special forces medic tossed targets for me and I hit the mustard seeds the first try again! He got my attention and announced to the audience that one of the seeds actually had a crease down it from the field point of one of my arrows!  After the show I met a special little boy who wanted to buy an arrow.  I told his father I didn’t sell my arrows but that I would give him one.  I signed an old, well worn arrow and gave it to him.  The father told me the little boy had recently had had a liver transplant and 20 surgeries.   When he left the little boy hugged me and said, “God Bless you.”   What a perfect ending to a great run of shows.

The Renfro show has always been special to me.  In 2007 Chuck Adams introduced my show.  That was the time then assistant show director Steve Garnell tossed three baby aspirin tablets into mid air and I hit them first try!  I have never done an appearance at the Renfro show without doing at least one first shot show on the baby aspirin.  I left there Sunday with that record in tact.  I look forward to getting back there around 2015.
For more info on this event, visit their show website at:  http://renfroproductions.com/deer-turkey-waterfowl/

 

That’s the latest.  Next up: Shows in Ohio and New York.  Until next time, Adios and God Bless.

 

Shoot Straight,

Frank Addington

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Published by KurtD on 15 Feb 2012

ARE YOU READY TO ROCK? – By Ted Nugent

ARE YOU READY TO ROCK?                                                                                                by Ted Nugent

When I ask myself if I’m ready, I mean am I really ready for anything and everything, all the time. Way before I think about preparing for the upcoming hunting season, I discipline myself to be ready for the day, each and every day when I rise to carpe’ diem! And boy do I ever carpe’ that Diem with a full throttled vengeance. Why mess around. Plan B is for clowns who think Hee Haw was a documentary.

I of course take the absolute best care possible of my mind, body, spirit and soul. I don’t eat junk, remain clean and sober at all costs, and fast food at the Nugent household is represented by teal in the freezer. We know our body is a sacred temple, and sacred temples don’t have toxins or blubber, San Antonio.

By the time I was nine, my wonderful over-disciplinarian dad drilled into our heads that the Boy Scout motto was not only for Boy Scouts, and that not only is being prepared the right and only mindset to have, but being unprepared is downright irresponsible and dangerous. Does anybody other than the Nugent boys still live this way? I hope so.

I lift myself out of bed, go through all the prepatory personal hygiene and fortification procedures, and make sure my pants pockets have all the bare essentials; pocket knife, folding knife, large handkerchief, truck and house keys, chapstick, lighter, folding reading glasses, small flashlight, spare 3V battery, a wad of guitar picks, wallet with ID, credit cards, cash, insurance card, a few business cards, family photos, a couple of bandaids, and a flat, lighted magnifying glass. No bulk, perfectly streamlined.

Then I go to my belt, on which I secure my handgun(s), spare mags, and belt tool.

In my double pocketed shirt I find my ever present small pad, pen, marker and cell phone, my law enforcement credentials and shield.

Okay, I’m ready for anything.

My truck is a whole different story, loaded with the basic survival, emergency gear obvious to those who live the rugged individualism that makes America and Texas great. Registration and proof of insurance, heavy duty work gloves, phone charger, flashlight, basic tools, air compressor, tire gauge, 1st aid kit, chainsaw,  flares, HD jack, jumper cables, rifle with lots of spare ammo, rain slicker, towel, snake bite kit, fire starter, a few MREs, some water and spare sun glasses to just name some of my gear.

You notice my phone, keys, handgun and other basics are on my person, not in my truck. A knife in the truck does not quality as a “pocket knife”. That would be a “truck knife” and will not be handy when away from the truck.

Critically, the same goes for your handgun. Everybody at Luby’s that fateful day had their guns in the truck, and only a fool would dare fail to learn from that lesson of life and death. I personally choose life.

Also in my truck is a full tank of fuel. I have taught my family that when the fuel gauge gets to the half way mark, fill er back up. With the lessons learned over so many years, a full tank of gas or diesel can make all the difference in the world when things go bad. And for those not paying attention, things do indeed go bad, and for the truly tuned in, things are more likely today to go real bad now more than ever. There’s a fuel gauge on your dash for a reason. Take a look at it often.

I hang out with some mighty rough and tumble hombres, hard-working ranching, outdoors types that fancy themselves plenty ready to rock. Unfortunately, many Texans are not really prepared adequately, more often than not, leaving everything “in the truck”.

Cellphones are small so as to be convenient to keep on our persons, on hand for when family and friends may really need to get ahold of us. And of course, they should be charged up each night while we sleep.

Same goes for that lovely little belt tool. I use mine dozens of times each and every day.

And handkerchiefs? I cannot believe how few men carry a clean handkerchief with them at all times. I consider it an essential.

As you read this little ditty here in our favorite outdoor publication, we are gearing up for spring turkey season, but I got my turkey hunting gear all reviewed and ready way back in January. In the springtime, I am actually getting ready for the fall hunting season, reviewing all my archery gear and making certain all my hunting gear is in perfect order way in advance so I don’t lose a precious minute when the season is upon us.

I will be rocking my royal keeshker off all summer long, but still shooting my bow and arrows every day to stay on my A game. Like a fighter jet pilot who must be ready at a moment’s notice, I like to manage my life to always be ready so I never have to scramble wildly at the last minute. Being prepared is good. Not being prepared, lame. Be prepared.

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Published by KurtD on 15 Feb 2012

THINK DEER – by Ted Nugent

THINK DEER                                                                                           by Ted Nugent

You can’t really close your eyes and read this, so instead, concentrate as you read and pump images of deer into your brain. Envision all those stunning beasts you have been so blessed to encounter over so many hunting seasons, and burn that beautiful picture deep into your cranium. Imprint it on your psyche, make it an actual element of your being. Now, doesn’t that feel good.

I am typing this little ditty in my Ranch King deer blind on a cold December afternoon, and I have eight whitetails in front of me right now, all within twenty yards. I sit spellbound.

An old matriarch doe is crazy alert, two doe fawns and a very handsome button buck with huge pronounced nubbins could care less as they nibble away. There is a yearling doe, a yearling three point buck, and a fat stud of a three year old eight point beast. They own me.

My heart is racing rather predictably, and I only keep typing because I am trying to convince myself to not shoot the handsome eight pointer.

Steady Uncle Ted. Steady as she goes.

For all the right reasons, I should kill that old doe as part of my Texas Parks and Wildlife Managed Land Deer Permit plan. We figure eight more does gotta go off our ground, and she’s an old gal that would be perfect to take out to better the herd. We shall see.

I really love hunting, ambushing and killing deer, love watching and videoing them, love being a natural part of their world, love grilling and eating them, really love sharing their sacred flesh with the regional Hunters for the Hungry program and the families of the US Military, but what turns me on the most is the intelligent, stewardship system by which we manage deer and all wild game for healthy, thriving populations and properly balanced conditions. By doing so, I can forever enjoy and celebrate all those other ways that I love deer.

I just looked up again from my laptop, and now there are ten deer. Another shooter doe and a scrawny spike horn buck arrived, and they are all bulking up on feed in the cold weather. They constantly look around and flinch at every bird, every breeze, and for many unknown reasons. What an amazing creature. I would propose that for millions and millions of us, our lives would be dramatically less enjoyable without deer. I know it has always been a powerful force of joy, inspiration and awe for me and my family.

The two big does just stood up on hind legs and went into that flurry of cartwheeling punches with their front hooves. That is some violent behavior right there, and any one of those cloven hooved blows could kill you outright. I am sure that while we are all conveniently tucked away in our cushy homes throughout the year, whitetail deer are knocking the living bejesus out of each other, including killing each other at a much higher rate that anyone really understands.

The button buck is way out of his league haranguing the old girl, as the rut is up and down for the last couple of months. I am real tempted to kill the puny spike and forkhorn, but at only one and a half years of age, their first set of antlers in no way provides a meaningful indicator of their genetic potential. Have you ever noticed that once we decide to not shoot a particular animal, that they pose perfectly broadside with their leg forward for the longest periods of time?

I just gulped a deep breath of freezing air, for a dynamo buckaroo just arrived on scene to take any deer hunter’s breath away. This majestic stag has ten perfectly defined points on his tall, wide, sweeping rack, and represents the kind of monster buck I would never have dreamed of coming in contact with growing up in the Midwest deer woods.

This incredible beast has no idea that a blood thirsty venison addict is only fifteen yards away in this dark blind, with a bow and arrow and razor sharp broadhead and the tags to go with them.

He noses the does and the other bucks give him lots of room, and with all the commotion, you couldn’t ask for a better opportunity to get to full draw on such a great deer. But I just gaze, video it all and type away, for though this buck’s antlers are very impressive and highly desirable, I can tell by his trim neck, brisket and body that he is only two and a half years old, the very definition of a quality deer management specimen to let walk.

I am so proud of myself. I am learning, and his presence literally increases my excitement just knowing such quality bucks are around. It wasn’t that many years ago that I would have killed him in an instant, but like so many other hunters these days, I know I can get all the venison I need by killing the right deer and letting the right deer grow to their potential.

Shooting light is gone now, all the deer have moved off, so I put away my vidcam, attach my quiver back on my bow and get ready to shut down my laptop, absolutely thrilled beyond words that I am a deer hunter. I head home with my soul filled with allthings deer.

Tomorrow in another day, and tomorrow is another deer. I will now fill my belly with some scrumptious backstraps and keep the spirit of the deer alive in everything I do.

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Published by KurtD on 15 Feb 2012

TEXAS TEN – by Ted Nugent

TEXAS TEN                                                                                 by Ted Nugent

 

I never really stop hunting. It is indeed a cherished, time honored lifestyle for me. A wonderful, totally alive, day by day celebratory outdoor lifestyle of great, deeply appreciated, heartfelt gratification. Self-sufficiency. Rugged individualism. Hands-on conservation. Private land ownership. Property rights. Privacy rights. Experimenting in “self-government”. We the people resource ownership and stewardship. The right to keep and bear arms. Live free of die. Don’t tread on me. Surely the ultimate American Dream the way I see it. Independent. Free. Self evident truth, God given right’s. Pursuit of happiness guaranteed. Perfect. You can’t do this in France.

 

The supremely enjoyable daily routines of checking my trapline, killing varmints, choosing and planting foodplots, running irrigation, positioning new deerstands, constructing groundblinds, upgrading old ones, checking fences and gates, filling waterholes and feeders, trimming shooting lanes, practicing with rifles, handguns, shotguns and bows, arranging and upgrading targets and ranges, training dogs and introducing new people to the joys of shooting, watching and studying wildlife and constantly strategizing ambush zones for my hunting clients, and more, are all chores and enjoyable outdoor activities that I really look forward to each day. Rocking my brains out nearly 100 concerts per year pretty much keeps me busy throughout the summer any way you cut it, so these wonderful activities which I live for in between rockouts do indeed keep me bright eyed and bushy tailed in a constant, energized way. When the actual official hunting season shows up in the fall of the year, my state of mind doesn’t need too much adjusting back to my natural predator mode and spirit. In fact, with the amazing year round hunting opportunities for exotic wildlife in my new adopted homestate of Texas, there are not any “No Hunting” days in my life. How cool is that? Godbless Texas, Godbless America and Godbless the beasts all!

 

Back in my ancestral homegrounds of Michigan, the seasonal changes are palpable. The air tastes different. Dramatic change is tangible. The planets do indeed realign and there is a mystically altered pulse in the wind. Ya gotta love that. Meanwhile, in the great Republic of Texas, one must routinely check the calendar so see if summer will ever end. Texas is hot. Usually hotter. For an old dyed-in-the-wool Michiganiac, it is a bit of a psychological adjustment to deal with all this blazing sunshine and brutal heat. But as a guitarplayer-cum-U.S. Marine, I can improvise, adapt and overcome with the best of them. And I do. There is no Plan B. It is time.

 

So it was, as the blistering fireball in the LoneStar sky grilled my inner being, nonetheless, the calendar read October and my spirit insisted on liftoff. All that dedicated boot time on my hunting grounds had kept me abreast of whitetail activity, and this day I chose a tall ladderstand nestled deep, and hidden within the green embrace of a tall pine tree overlooking a winding, rocky creek course amongst the thorny screen of greenbriar, assorted impenetrable tangles and relentless juniper. A line of huge, towering pecan and live oak trees made up the forest before and behind me, and with the gentle southwest breeze, my confidence ran high. It is always a roll of the hunter’s dice, but we had a full on backstrap mojo going on this day. I could feel it. You never know, but we always hope.

 

After a long wait, the eye-candy parade of beautiful, sleek, healthy does and fawns ghosted from the shadows as the sun dipped lower. Some of the whitetails were red, some brown, others slate grey. A few of the fawns still showed remnant spots, confirming that the breeding does indeed continue well into winter. Momentarily, a small forked horn, a spike and a fat, muscular, slick six joined the group. My elevated ambush hideout gave me a perfect viewing position to watch the group of 20 plus deer carryon undisturbed, and again provided me the greatest joy that is being a hunter. To be on the inside of their natural world has a powerful healing and calming effect on me, and I studied each animal in detail through my Yukon binoculars. Mutual grooming, prancing, kicking, nipping, licking, head butting, sparring, browsing and constantly examining their surroundings with an uncanny alertness entertained me completely. I love every minute of such encounters and it represents a prime allure to the great outdoors lifestyle. The critters never let you down and there is never a dull moment.

 

Early season bucks tend to hang out in bachelor groups, and the slight glint of bone through the scrub materialized into antlers as five stud boys emerged from the tangle down below. The first two were handsome 2-3 year old eight pointers, followed by a 3-4 year old 9, then another young eight. It was the arrival of massive, tall, wide, light colored antlers that got me. With a dandy set of impressive antlers towering over his distinctive, Roman nosed face, one hog of a mature buck strode up the creek embankment and waddled into view. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that Texas whitetails are small, for this old granddaddy of a buck was every bit as fat, muscular and heavy as a Kansas or Michigan brute up North. I could tell by the deep chest and brisket, and the fat belly that I had before me a 7+ year old trophy. Now the slight trembling began.

 

Slowly lifting my binocular, I examined this fine buck carefully and realized that I knew this old boy. I had encountered him in this same grove late last season. His distinctive white legs and exaggerated white facial markings clearly identified him as my old buddy. My bow was already at half mast, Scott release locked onto my bowstring, and my mind made up.

 

The does and fawns and younger bucks backed away as the old boy strode toward the small piles of Wildlife Innovations Buck bran I had put out as an attractant, and now my inner predator ballet was going into the gutpile pirouette hyper two step. I dance divinely.

 

A slight screen of leaves on a young cedar elm separated my arrow from his vitals, so I had no clear shot. It doesn’t take much interference to deflect a speeding arrow, so I held tight. As goes bowhunting, the big boy kept his forward shoulder toward my position for a long while, and life around me ceased to exist. It was just his ribcage and my broadhead that existed, nothing else.

 

With a graceful swing of his long neck and head, he took a step to his right, bringing his bulky chest clear of any obstruction, and the mushy 55# CP Oneida bow flexed back smoothly on its own. I zeroed in dead on the crease behind his left foreleg, and the next thing I knew, big white feathers were dangling out of his armpit as he and all the other deer exploded at once. Angling forward as he had turned, the zebra colored GoldTip shaft had surely sliced through his ribs and into the life pumping heart of the old beast, his sagging hindquarters telling of his imminent demise. Big Jim swung the SpiritWild vidcam from the now departed buck’s vaportrail, onto my now smiling, giddy face for the whole word to share, and I was one happy American bowhunter to say the least.

 

We captured on tape all the glory and joy of this wonderful, perfect hunting connection, then filmed the short, quick bloodtrail and recovery to the heartshot monster. Everytime we collect these wildlife gifts, a Nuge party erupts in the forests and wildgrounds of the world, knowing and celebrating the thrills of being so intimately functional as a beneficial, positive participant in this natural tooth, fang and claw world. Every exacting nuance and detail of the pre-event, anticipation, encounter, shot preparation and intense action is relived and articulated as clearly as possible, so that the viewer of our Spirit of the Wild TV shows and videos better understands the depth of spirit, form and function of the real world that we are living and documenting. Life and death is it. It is perfect. Shame on those who pretend otherwise. Rejoice to be a player.

 

For the Best of Spirit of The Wild DVDs or Ted Nugent Hunt Music CDs, contact tednugent.com or call 800-343-4868. Dealer inquiries welcome.

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Published by admin on 06 Feb 2012

Aspirinbuster Visits the Chicago Outdoor Sportsman Show

Straight Shot
with frank addington, jr.

Frank Sinatra once sang that “Chicago is my kind of town…” Now that I have attended the 2012 Chicago Outdoor Sportsman Show I can also say that after 27 years on stage, Chicago is finally my kind of town too! I’d wanted to work this market for a long time and it never worked out. I’d heard Fred Bear, Ann Clark, Dick Mauch and others talk about the famous Chicago shows but I had never been booked to perform there. I came close in 2011 but it didn’t work out.

It looked like I wouldn’t have a chance to do the show when I heard that there would not be a 2012 Chicago show. However, an east coast based company called MET group stepped up and started to organize a show in three months time! I was booked to perform along with my friend Jeff Watson and his huge bruin, Brody the Bear. There were many other features there of interest to sportsmen including seminars and demos, 3-D archery, and other activities.

My sidekick for the weekend would be one of the show’s employees Jimmy. He’d never thrown for me or even seen the show. I told him what we’d be doing and it was showtime…. he did a super job that first night and I hit the baby aspirin shot second try! I told him he was hired and that I wanted him to throw the rest of the weekend. Saturday morning the audience and Jimmy was amazed when I hit the three baby aspirin/three arrow shot first try! Then we followed that up with three mustard seeds and three arrows–and hit that first try too! Never underestimate the help a good assistant is. There is an art to tossing targets and some people have it and some don’t.

They captured one performance and we have that on video you can see here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEvSZPfbYZ0

I really enjoyed doing this show. Folks asked lots of questions and I remember doing some outdoor radio shows to promote this event. We had good crowds and this show did very well to have been organized in such a short period of time. If you want more information, you can visit the MET Group’s website for this event at :

www.chicagosportsmenshow.com

Special thanks to MET Group, Jimmy, the audiences, show staff and everyone that came to the show. I had a great time and look forward to coming back! The Rosemont Convention Center is a short distance from O’Hare airport which was also handy. Ole’ Blue eyes was right, “Chicago is my kind of town.” Great to be in a town where so many of my archery heroes have performed!

That’s the latest. Coming up: Shows in Indianapolis at the Indiana Deer, Turkey, and Waterfowl Expo and then on to Ohio for the first annual “Eastern Ohio Sportsman Expo.”

Thanks for reading. Until next time, Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank

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Published by admin on 12 Dec 2011

CHECK CHECK DOUBLE CHECK CHECK AGAIN

CHECK CHECK DOUBLE CHECK CHECK AGAIN

by Ted Nugent

Alright, I better write this while I’m still seething. I am so angry my blood boils, my eyes are bloodshot, I twitch, turning beet red, lips pursed so tight it hurts, fuming, seeing red, snarling, forehead furrowed deeply with a full body scowl to scare the devil himself. Did I mention that I am really, really angry?
The first word in this piece is alright. Well, nothing is all right, I assure you. Anything but.
Being that I fancy myself Mr. Cocked Locked and absolutely ready to ROCK, Captain Detail, Mr. Smarty Pants Know it all master of allthings shoot, hunt, ambush sniper world, it is with great pain, humility and consternation that I am compelled to share with you how Mr. Murphy can sneak into our psyche no matter how dialed in, prepared or attentive we may otherwise dedicate ourselves to be.
Personally, at this point in time, I suck.
Okay, in the real world of meaningful priorities like God, family, health, country and freedom, my painful evening on deerstand last night doesn’t really qualify as all that upsetting. We miss. Get over it. Yet here I am, head hung and forlorn like little Teddy just lost his favorite puppy dog.
Here’s how it unraveled; Throttling onward nonstop with much gusto for my truly inspiring 2011-2012 hunting season, I had a wonderful meeting with my SpiritWild Ranch hunters as the rain poured down on our little chunk of Texas hunting heaven. Everyone was excited to be at our special camp with the barometer and temperature plunging, making for some optimal critter encounter conditions.
Master guide Paul Wilson organized the guys to head out for their killer blinds, and I decided to return to my Ranch King portable tucked into a nice jungle of cedars and tangled blowdowns on the edge of the big hay field.
With rain pelting my snug little coop, I smacked away on my laptop writing more invigorating celebrations of our beloved hunting lifestyle, not really expecting shooter beasts to arrive in the pouring rain.
Next thing I know, a highly desirable, elusive “Alberta” whitetail 10 point is smack dab in front of me eating corn at the Hang Em High feeder before it even went off. YIKES!
I’ve never had a shot at this particular buck that looks like he belongs in the forests of Alberta, Canada, and I was about to implode with excitement at the opportunity before me.
I carefully turned on the SpiritWild vidcam, silently set down my laptop, reached for my bow, then zoomed in on the trophy beast.
He was joined by his girlfriend, then out of nowhere, a spotted axis doe poked her head out of the scrub into my little clearing.
Axis! Axis deer are so incredibly elusive on SpiritWild Ranch that we are lucky to get a quick glimpse at them but few times each year. I knew that if a doe was here, the herd must be close behind.
One by one, the majestic Chital deer emerged, including monster stag after monster stag, right there in front of me, within 20 yards. I captured all their antics as they jockeyed for position until the biggest baddest buck went broadside.
Like a million times before, I picked a spot, gracefully drew back my arrow, and let er rip for a gimme trophy of a lifetime.
And ladies and gentlemen, the winner of the embarrassing NumbNut of The Year Award goes to, (drumroll) Teeeeeddddd Nuuuuuugent!!
My orange Lumenok told no lie as it zinged six inches under the huge stags brisket. At about 18 yards ya all!
I’m here to tell you I was supremely aghast. With my Robin Hood sniper arrow routine going so beautifully all season, how can this possibly be?
As the sickness in my stomach began to subside, I nocked an arrow in the garage, took aim at the Big Green target at 15 yards and sent two arrows touching each other, SIX INCHES LOW!
I cradle and protect my bow with tender loving care each and every day. How the sights could have gotten that far off from one day to the next will forever be a mystery. But since I have written and raved about it so many times over the years, I may want to obey my own rules of bowhunting and take a “feel” shot before each hunt, and I think I shall.
It’s not only an archery thing, but as we all know, each year somebody at many camps somewhere will experience the heartbreak of a bad shot for inexplicable reasons. Inexplicable that is until we admit that we all know things can go wrong, so we really oughtta plan on them and do everything in our power to keep them from happening.
Under most conditions, there will be an opportunity to take that pre-hunt test shot with both bow and or gun so we can be certain everything is tight, sighted in and in order before that long awaited moment of truth on the beast.
Mr. Murphy is a predator, an indiscriminate, soulless, uncaring predator, and as his prey, we best be aware that he is ubiquitous, so check, check and double check, then check again to keep the punk at bay.
I’m on my way to my stand now, and I just took a shot to be sure I am ready. ZI am ready, and vow to always be ready forevermore.

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Published by admin on 22 Sep 2011

Archery’s loss Heaven’s gain… Dick Lattimer passes

Straight Shot
with frank addington, jr.

Archery’s loss Heaven’s gain… Dick Lattimer passes

I got sad news this evening via email from my friend Dick Mauch. It seems that we have lost another member of our archery family with the passing of Dick Lattimer around 3AM on the morning of Tuesday, September 6, 2011. Dick was a great man and did so much for the sport of archery. Most everyone knows how close Dick was to the late Fred Bear, whom he worked for over 20 years. Although he handled advertising and PR for Bear, he and Fred seemed to me to have a close knit bond like a father-son relationship. He helped usher in the boom in archery the sport had in the 1970’s by promoting the Bear campaign, “Become a two season hunter.” When you saw Fred at a public event in the 1970’s until his passing, Dick was usually at his side camera and notepad in hand.

In addition to a career at Bear, Dick was also heavily involved in AMO, and authored at least four books, one on space, one on Jesus, and the two books, “I remember Papa Bear” and “Hunt with Fred Bear.” He was also involved with the Archery Hall of Fame and other archery related organizations. Although I never met her, his emails to me often mentioned his wife Alice, who survives Dick. We had a running joke because I often did summer shows in Florida, and Dick & his wife would be in Indiana for the summer and then in the winter when I did the Indiana show Dick and Alice would be back in Florida. I would often tease Dick for avoiding me and my show. It became a running joke. Dick had a great sense of humor.

In the coming days I am sure there will much written about this fine man. He is an archery Hall of Fame member and did so much for our sport. I am reminded of the story about the great western actor Ben Johnson. Johnson won an Oscar for his role in “The Last Picture Show” before John Wayne won his Oscar for True Grit. Yet even while Johnson had an Oscar, and at the time Duke did not, Johnson often had roles that had him playing John Wayne’s sidekick. One reporter once asked if that didn’t bother Johnson being such an accomplished actor and yet playing second fiddle to Wayne, Johnson is supposed to have replied, “Somebody has to hold the horses….” That was Dick Lattimer. He never seemed to mind helping shine the spotlight on Fred Bear, Bear Archery and the sport of archery. He was always behind the scenes, running a camera, video camera, or banging out words on a typewriter. In my book Dick was as good as they come.

I thanked him a just a few years ago for not running me off as a kid when I would bug Fred at shows. He could have and yet never did. As a matter of fact, I still have an envelope of photos Dick sent me of Fred and I at an event. He mailed them to me a few weeks after the show. During the event, my parent’s and I had attended a big fancy private party Fred hosted in Atlanta during the SHOT SHOW. We stayed till the end and walked down the hall as Fred and Dick left the party. I snapped a photo of the two of them walking down the hall together, the hero and his trusty sidekick. Now days I view them both as heroes. I see that it was Dick who often was behind the scenes helping steer the media and image of Fred and Bear Archery.

His eulogy “It was quiet in the forest” that he wrote and read at Fred’s service was one of the most beautiful eulogies I’d ever seen. Although I didn’t attend the service, he sent me a big packet of stuff shortly after Fred’s service which had a copy of that eulogy in it. He was thoughtful like that because he knew just how much I loved and admired Fred. Dick was often selfless and always thinking of others. Anyway, perhaps that’s a fitting end for our friend Dick, because once again the crow has come to tell us of the death of that giant Bear’s great and trusted friend. The Forest is again quiet.. So long Dick, we’ll miss you. Thanks again…….. our sad loss is now Heaven’s gain.

Frank Addington, Jr.

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Published by admin on 29 Aug 2011

Straight Shot
with frank addington, jr.


The Aspirin Buster tour rolls on..

A variety of shows and events have made summer 2011 a busy time for me. I hope that you have enjoyed your summer. As we all anxiously await fall for obvious reasons, college football and hunting season, I took a few minutes to reflect on recent shows and events. Summer 2011 has had lots of great events…

July 15-17 I was in Alabama for the 28th Annual World Deer Expo in Birmingham, Alabama. This is one of the largest shows of it’s type in the country and I enjoyed a return visit to this venue. Bob Coker and I did some media Friday morning early, including a visit to a local Birmingham radio show. Here’s video footage of that media appearance, visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dc1BMeUlFM We also did a TV news appearance while at this venue. Bob runs a great show and if you are an exhibitor this is a good opportunity to see lots of folks in one weekend, he gets a great crowd at this event.

July 28-30 I was in Coudersport, PA to perform shows at “Denton Hill” or ETAR, the Eastern Traditional Archery Rendezvous. This is dubbed one of the largest traditional archery events in the country and people come from far and wide to this event. Held at a ski resort, there are archery ranges, vendors in tents, practice ranges, the famous blanket sell where people lay items on blankets each evening to sale or trade, and lots of other fun activities. I don’t often do many “archery only” events like this so it was nice to spend a weekend among traditional archers. I met some new friends, saw some old friends, and had a great weekend. Saturday night’s 8PM show was my favorite. A little boy asked to shoot 20 arrows at once. Although I only had 12, I loaded all 12 on the string and popped a balloon with them. This was a new shot and the audience liked it so much that I have done it several times at shows since. The grand finale that night was a mustard seed. I had four spotters come up from the audience, put a black background on my net so we could all see the seed, and Jake Chapman tossed the seed into mid air. I hit it first shot! I dedicated the shot to my friend the late Rev. Stacy Groscup, who often performed at Denton Hills.

August 5-6 was the big DEERASSIC CLASSIC event in Cambridge, Ohio. This is the event that draws 15,000 plus people. I performed twice on Saturday, once in the afternoon and the grand finale was Saturday evening at 7:20PM, just before the big fifty fifty drawing took place and then country singer Josh Thompson performed. As I walked out on stage Saturday night, it looked like a sea of people. They video the show and broadcast it on the grounds with jumbotron screens. After hitting the three baby aspirin tablets, I announced to the crowd that we were gonna attempt the mustard seed shot. Conner put up a dark background on the net and did a practice throw. His next toss went up and again, FIRST SHOT! That was a great way to close the show. This is a one of a kind event that I often have heard called the “Woodstock of hunting.”

August 20-21 I joined my friend Bud at the Wheeling, West Virginia Cabela’s for a weekend of exhibitions there. I did two Saturday and two Sunday. This show was challenging weathewise, Saturday we had extreme heat and sunshine and then Sunday had high winds. We moved the show under the main entrance and had some great audiences over the four performances. I hit the mustard seed at every show, and this is getting to be a popular shot. I did two radio interviews, Chris Lawrence mentioned the show being at Cabelas on his statewide “WV Outdoors” show, and a TV news station captured the mustard seed shot on camera while I was in town. Cabela’s fed me well and I had a great time at this event. This is their third largest footprint in all the Cabela’s, at 175,000′ ft. They also have a million ‘ ft. distribution center nearby so Cabela’s has had a big impact on the economy in Wheeling, WV.

August 27-28 I will be performing at Festival in the Pines in Eau Claire, WI. I have performed in Eau Claire many times at the Northern Wisconsin Deer Classic but have not performed in Eau Claire in the summer. I am looking forward to this event. After that I head back to Nebraska for more shows and then on to other places for appearances through November. I’ll take December off to be home for the holidays before the January season kicks off another year of shows. So it goes in the life of a traveling archery showman. We are currently working on the Winter 2012 schedule and will try and post some dates/locations soon. I am looking forward to working with the Renfro family again in Indianapolis in 2012, they have a great show and I always enjoy performing there.

I’ve now added the 12 arrow shot and the mustard seed shot to our programs in most places. So far the audiences love the new shots. They are both challenging but then again so is a baby aspirin from behind the back, right? That’s the latest on the “HAVE BOW WILL TRAVEL” tour. Visit www.frankaddingtonjr.com for more information on my show. You can video footage on page 2 of the website.

Seeing is believing, see you at the show!

Until next time, Adios and God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.
The Aspirinbuster

Photo is on stage at the 2011 DEERASSIC CLASSIC event.

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Published by KurtD on 18 Jul 2011

It’s All About The Memories By: Ted Nugent

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MEMORIES
By: Ted Nugent

Growing up in the new musical whirlwind of Chuck Berry, Bo Diddly, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis and the thrilling new bowhunting world of Fred Bear was very, very exciting. Inspired by these masters of rock-n-roll, I attacked my guitar and musical dreams with a passion fire the likes of which I had no control over. And as far as the mystical flight of the arrow went, I was long gone, addicted, hooked, in love L-U-V, bow and arrow crazy.

Driven by the love and discipline of my incredible parents, I practiced my guitar with a vengeance and shot my bow and arrows every day. I literally could not get enough of either of these passions, and pursued them with every ounce of my being. It was a fascinating, wonderful way to grow up in America, and my memory bank bursts at the seams with glowing, powerful images of family joy and happiness with guitars, guns, bows and arrows.

But as jam packed as my memory bank is, unfortunately the family photo album is a little sparse on snapshots from the old Brownie automatic camera. We have a few dazzling photos of our wonderful family doing all sorts of fun stuff in those early years of the 1950s and early 60s, but I sure wish we had taken the time to take more photos.

As I think back to those annual excursions Up North for opening day of bow season in October, my mind reels with graphic details of the gas stations with bows and arrows and guns and ammo on display. The firestorm of colors in those Michigan hardwoods is as if they are silkscreened on my soul.

I can see my hero Fred Bear sitting next to me at the counter of the Grayling restaurant eating our cherry pie and sipping big glasses of milk together.

How I wish we had captured those incredible memories on film.

We don’t have photos of us catching little blue gills at the woodland lake. No photos of the little log cabin on the beautiful Titabawasee River, gathering wood, hauling water, frying bacon, roasting marshmallows, shooting our bows and .22 rifles.

There are no photos of my first squirrel, my fist deer, my first rabbit.

I would have never imagined I would grow up to be a professional outdoor writer or New York Times Best Selling author, much less the American rock-n-roll guitar guy. No one could have ever guessed I would dedicate my life to promoting our honorable hunting heritage and Second Amendment rights. Photos of my early years living that life sure would have come in mighty handy for such a career.

And even if such a career had never taken shape, I would really love to be able to show my kids and grandkids photos of the old man in action as a little boy who cherished my outdoor lifestyle from the very beginning.

So here’s to everyone out there who loves the great outdoors and thrills at taking our kids, grandkids, family and friends hunting, fishing, trapping, shooting, camping, boating and exploring.

Do yourself a favor and always bring along a decent camera with plenty of spare batteries and memory cards. Take that extra time to stop and document what I believe to be the most cherished lifetime memories of all; families having fun living the outdoor lifestyle.

Capture those life forming moments when we are celebrating the outdoor life we all so love. Get a photo of the young boys and girls with their first fish, their first bulls-eye, a first burnt marshmallow or a hot dog on a stick over an open campfire. Document those glowing smiles, not just for the happy, forever memories, but also to share with other friends, neighbors and classmate just how much fun all these great outdoor activities are for everyone fortunate enough to live them.

By sharing such photos with others, I am convinced the joys will be contagious and a darn good tool for luring more and more families into the shooting sports, and we can all agree just how great that always is.

You and your entire family will be happy you did.

Guns; check. Ammo; check. Bows and arrows; check. Tent; check. Stools; check. Canoe; Check. Fishing poles; Check. Tacklebox; Check. Bait; Check. Camera and batteries; Check. Happy

 

 

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