Archive for the 'Bowhunting' Category

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Jeff-NC on 07 Jul 2013

Unbelievable Bow Shooting! I Bet You Can’t Do This

My dad and I are pretty close and we are always talking and sharing stuff related to golf, fishing and hunting.  So last week he sent me an email with the subject line

“You Ain’t Going To Believe This”

When I opened the email it had the link below and a one line description that read

Bow hunting for doves.

Amazing archery skills

Amazing archery skills

Now I have dove hunted with shotguns and I know just how hard it is.  So I was really expecting to open the link and see a video of a guy shooting 50 flu flu arrows to kill one dove.

Man, I was wrong.  This video is one of the most impressive examples of shooting skill that I have ever seen.  The hunter is Tim Wells and many of you know his talent.  I’ll stop yapping now and tell you that you need to take 3 minutes and watch the video.

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 30 Jun 2013

Bwana Bubba’s Thoughts – On Being Field Prepared!

This article is about being prepared for the un-expected in the field.  

Then again on a well planned trip, you forget an important item that might just save your life!

Many years ago when I was leaving Vietnam after a tour with the 5th Marines and got into the back to the Duce and Half, which was supposed to be heading to the airbase in DaNang a not so funny thing happened.   As most know, since I was heading back to Naval Communications Station in the Philippines I turned in my M-16, 1911 and my M-3 Grease Gun.  The driver a young Marine E-2 just in kcountry forgot something very important, especially when you get lost and drive into enemy country.   Maybe he thought he was in Conus and it was a trip into the countryside?   We came under fire, with the yelling and moving into the driver’s seat, we all survived.   His M-16 and bandoliers’ were still back at the command up on Hill 327!

In the modern day world I do not believe that anyone that goes out into the Great Outdoors should ever be in a situation of being lost and not being able to get back out on their own unless they are hurt and unable to move!  One can be lost of course, but one should be able to recover easily from being lost in the moment!

Yet so many times we hear of kids, hunters, hikers’, cross country skiers, snow mobile riders, and mountain climbers getting lost for days.   I wonder about the mine set of people, except the kids that should have help from guiding parents in the fundamentals of being in the outdoors.

Does one really feel that this mountain has any feeling about you? The fact that Mother Nature determines the out come of weather, one should always be on the ready for anything!  Bwana Bubba

Does one really feel that this mountain has any feeling about you? The fact that Mother Nature determines the out come of weather, one should always be on the ready for anything! Bwana Bubba

Years ago mountain climbers were the direct cause of a National Guard Helicopter going down on Mt. Hood in Oregon, thus costing millions of dollars of equipment lose.

Just the recently there was a young man lost in the rugged Columbia River Gorge in Oregon.  His comment after being found was “I am going right back out”, note that it was raining hard and the area is very steep and heavy timbered with many deep canyons of no return.  Of course he did not have a GPS or any other type of communications that working in the field.  I do not think he had a clue as to the cost, plus the fact he was a flatlander (from the Midwest).

Another one lost on Mt. Hood this week had forgotten this locating beacon.  Everyone said he was a very experience mountain climber.  Mt. Hood as any other mountain doesn’t care how experience you are, as Mother Nature is not forgiving!  The Air National Guard in a Blackhawk Helicopter found his body!  Terrible as he might have fallen and died on impact, but if not maybe he would be telling the story of the climb today!

I am firm believer of modern day GPS products such as Garmin GPS’s that have high sensitive antennas that will work in deep cover.  Many do not realize that many GPS products that don’t have high sensitive antenna or WASS Enabled.  If a GPS does not these features it will not record tracks or even pick up the satellites in deep timber.

Families that take their young children up in the mountains prior to Christmas to look for a tree for Christmas might think about having one of the Garmin GPS or similar products for dogs.  Funny!  Not really, as kids have a habit of moving fast and panic sets in.   Many years ago (1998) in Oregon on such a trip a young boy was lost.  I do not believe he was ever found, so the possibility of him being abducted might be there.  The instance that the parent could not see him, they could have located him quickly.

There are also hand-held 2 way radios that will reach with line of sight for 25+ miles.  Years ago there was a man lost in Oregon and the searchers were able to find him as he had a 2 way radio that he was sending out for help.  It was picked up some 50+ miles away.

Persons that are going mountain climbing on such treacherous places such  Mt. Hood, Mt. Lassen, Mt St. Helens or any other place with glaciers and changing weather at moment’s notice should have a locating beacon at all times with them.  You can rent them on most mountains or just buy one.  It is not required in the liberal state of Oregon.  A few mountain climbing organizations’ feel it infringes on one’s right.  Thou it is ok to bring out a team to find the lost souls and maybe lose a person in the search or equipment.

Have I forgotten about the cell phones, which have become so good with GPS and long lasting batteries?   One can always have a solar cell and recharge the phone when there is some sun.   I know it all about the weight when climbing, hunting or hiking right!?

For some it all about the money, yet how much does a pair of cross country skis cost, the outfit, the Weatherby rifle, and the mountain climbing goggles?   Yet again is about being macho or just knowing you are the best.   I feel the same way, but I know from being turned around a few times, that it better to be safe and make it back to camp then spend the night out.  I have spent the night out in bad weather, not due to being lost, but because the conditions would put me at risk in treacherous rimrock of the John Day River Canyon!

Years ago while hunting in the Snake River Canyon I came out on the ridge road two hours after dark fell upon the Snake River and wondering where my horse was located.  It was such a relief for me that Czar whinnied and I was able to get to him quickly.  I never carried a GPS in those days, as they were new and I only packed a compass.  I could have walked out as there was the ridge road, but how about Czar.  A GPS in hand I could have plugged in the waypoint where I left Czar while I was elk hunting.

My thoughts are the following and if one ever wanted to hunt with me and I don’t have many hunt with me as I do not want the responsibility of them!

The equipment with the following attached is required!

1)      Cell Phone – GPS capabilities if you not going to have a GPS.

2)      A two way handheld communications device, similar to Motorola’s.

3)      GPS – Colored with mapping capabilities – GARMIN is preferred.

4)      Mapping to go with the GPS, such as Hunting GPS Maps that will give you private boundaries.

5)      If in treacherous mountainous areas a locating beacon is required.

6)      Some extra batteries for devices that are not using lithium batteries

7)      Your own toilet paper!

In closing with just the GPS, one can back track to their original starting place and if the GPS has Topographic mapping, one could possibly figure out a direct route back if the terrain is manageable.

Don’t leave home with just your clothes, the basics and your bow or rifle!

Bwana Bubba

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 03 Jun 2013

Bwana Bubba’s Last Minute Oregon Blacktail Buck

Blacktail Buck in the Unit in 2013!
Blacktail Buck in the Unit in 2013!

THE SHOULDA –WOULDA – I DID BUCK

This hunt took place on the last day of the archery season in Oregon and it was my last and final effort to harvest a Blacktail Buck after a great deal of hunting during the season.  It also would be the first time I exposed my young daughter to an animal of majestic qualities to her dead to look at and touch!

An extremely large buck just stood there looking at me, probably wondering why anyone would be down in a hole like this!   This deer hunt was the end of a long Oregon deer season for me.  Earlier that season, I spent four days at Hart Mountain in southeastern Oregon looking for one of the famous big mule deer bucks that dwell there.  My vacation time had been changed and I was not able to hunt the first part of the season with my group.  So getting that early jump on a big velvet buck was gone.  I’d seen as many as 14 bucks in a group at one time prior to the season.  Truly the big bucks had been stirred up by earlier hunters and were keeping their distance.

I found myself seeking a buck to take home on the last day of the late November hunt in the Santiam Hunt Unit in Western Oregon, just west of the National Forest Boundary in the BLM. It seems on the last day we (empty-handed) will do some strange things. The trip in itself was similar to my earlier trips in which I covered innumerable miles looking for greener pastures.  I must have traveled 800 miles in three days only to find myself hunting in dense forest 30 miles from Portland, Oregon my home. On this trip, I was by myself, my partners having had their fill of hunting for one season. With the heavy rain & wet snow coming and going, I’d just about had enough myself. Then by mid afternoon it started to snow and by 3 PM there was about 4 inches of fresh snow on the ground. I was glad I’d missed a 60-yard shot at a small buck I should have not taken with the wind blowing.  The small buck seemed to be playing king of the mountain standing on a ledge overlooking a deep canyon.  If I’d hit him, he surely would have taken to the canyon below – what a pack out that would have been.
So, like any other sane bowhunter, I went down into the canyon. I decided to walk the naked alders and fir trees, which seemed to surround the small creek that wound through the canyon. I noticed some large deer tracks in the snow and told myself they must belong to a big Blackie.  I hadn’t covered more than 100 yards when I just about stepped on a deer. I was so busy stepping over downed limbs and following the tracks that I didn’t even noticed the deer bedded under a fir tree.  The most beautiful Blacktail I’d ever seen jumped up and ran out 30 yards and turned broadside to me and gazed back at me. Not taking time to count points, I was already at full drew with my Martin Cougar Magnum, set the 30 yard pin on the buck’s chest, and let fly. One would have thought I was shooting with fingers, ah I was shooting with fingers.  The buck was no longer just standing, he’d flat busted out of there. He moved so fast I just shook my head and wondered if I’d missed. I went to the spot where the buck had been, no blood. Now the snow was really coming down and the wind had picked up in the canyon. My heart pounding in my chest, all I could do was follow the tracks in the direction he’d gone.  I started to notice some foamy blood spots and walked about 80 yards on the blood trail, stopped, and looked around. There, in the ferns just below me, was the butt of a deer.  He must have taken one last leap in this last breath! The broadhead had done its job; my shot was a bit high barely missing the heart. I was able to find a small road out of the canyon, thus was able to drive my truck with chains forward and aft down into the canyon.  The buck was a heavy load to pull up into the bed of the truck, especially since I was wet, tired and the snow being everywhere.
My Columbia Blacktail had one of the most beautiful basket sets of horns a person could want, a very symmetrical four point with eye guards. He scored officially at 129 7/8 P & Y Net (Pope & Young).  Never wait so long to get an animal scored!  If he had not had a small chip off of the G-4 on left side, it would have made the B & C (Boone & Crockett) book along with the P & Y book during that time frame. Now in B & C is at 135 to be listed.  I’ll bet that a great deal of hunters do not know that you can list your Archery harvested animals in Boone & Crockett also if it meets their standards.  Double the pleasure of being in both Books! Sometimes it pays to do the unexpected at the last minute.  

Hmm! Now I will check out the head!

You can see from the expression on my daughter’s about her thoughts of seeing a dead animal lying on the ground. In the future I found she would not want to harvest an animal, but would get involved with the field dressing of animals on trips that I took her on.  

Rebecca wondering what the heck dad!

Have fun hunting!  Bwana Bubba 

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by admin on 01 May 2013

THE MOST IMPORTANT AND EXCITING SAFARI OF ALL

THE MOST IMPORTANT AND EXCITING SAFARI OF ALL             by Ted Nugent

The huge, gnarly grizzly bear was pretty much hidden in the jungle-like thicket of the tree covered knob only 30 yards away. Four year old grandson Caeden crouched beside me, shaking with excitement as we ever so slowly creeped slightly closer, one very careful tippy toe baby step at a time.

Staying in the shadows, we kept the wind in our face, and used every trick in the book to sneak into bow and arrow range of our stunning, wary trophy.

Finally, we were within 20 yards when the beast stood on its hind legs, and in one lifetime learned graceful swoop, my arrow was off and zapped the fury monster right in the pumper, and little Caeden and poppy jumped for joy! The smile on his little face, and mine, would provide an immeasurable joyous spiritual muscle memory explosion forevermore.

Ok, it wasn’t a real grizzly bear, but we consider any good sized groundhog in the garden or front yard to be every bit as worthy and thrilling a trophy as a genuine Alaska coastal 10 foot brownie. We know how to live!

When in doubt, whip it out, we always say. So after a wonderful morning of grandpa and grandson suburban adventure, bird life, flora and fauna identification education fun, it was only natural for young Caeden to alert me to the meanderings of big small game in the nearby shrubbery.

He learned much that beautiful spring morning, eyes wide with instinctual fascination at allthings wild. Like all kids, and grandparents too, we spend extremely valuable time together in the great outdoors fabricating makeshift bows and arrows and spears and slingshots and forts and ambush hideaways in preparation for the monumental Big Day when he can join poppy in a real deerblind ready to kill a real deer. It is who he is.

Caeden learned critical lessons about the very exciting higher level of predator awareness, the sneaky fun of stealthy stalking, the intimate relationship with the critters, the wind, the sun and the importance of our own natural sensual radar.

Re-living my own youthful adventures vicariously through him all over again, I celebrated the incredible joys of every such experience with all my kids, grandkids and the many young people over many, many years that I have been moved to guide into this greatest of lifestyles.

I have the image of every introductory moment burned boldly into my psyche, and such memories are a very powerful source of my overall quality of life. Theirs too.

All hunters know the pivotal life and death importance of turning youngsters on to the outdoor lifestyle and the stimulating discipline of aim small miss small everything. Never underestimate the power of little hunts, small adventures, any and all special moments together in the wild.

It doesn’t have to include a grizzly bear kill, or any kill whatsoever. As long as we share our own genuine excitement and passion for the overall experience beyond the pavement, pointing out those little things that originally turned us on and steered us into this most gratifying hands-on conservation fun.

Heck, simply teaching a little boy or a little girl how to properly and safely whittle a stick into a marshmallow roaster prong will do it everytime. It is in our DNA.

As we all painfully witness the desouling of America into a nation of electronic game zombies and dependent softies, many of us are convinced that our rugged individual capabilities as epitomized by the hunting lifestyle will ultimately determine the survival of The American Dream and the self-sufficient American way of life.

So take the time to organize a fun outing with the kids in your life. Teach them the basics of archery, marksmanship, wildlife lore, sustain yield resource management, the stewardship realities of wildlife habitat production of clean air, soil and water, and quality of life itself.

Teach them to waste not, want not, to put more back in than we take out, to respect their own sacred temple and how being clean and sober is the ultimate natural healthy high. Teach them that ultimately as goes the health of Ma Nature, goes the health of mankind. All it takes is a little time and effort in the wild.

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 18 Mar 2013

Bwana Bubba’s Thoughts – Hunting Equipment – Blacktail Deer Hunt

Oregon needs to get in the 21st Century on Lighted Nocks & Expandable-Mechanical Broadheads

Sweet Baby James’s Oregon Blacktail Hunt of Woes!

Though this is not a long story about a successful so to speak Blacktail Buck hunt in the late season 2012 archery hunt in Oregon, it is about absurd hunting regulations on bow hunting brought upon by the minority to the majority.

When I get into the story you the reader will understand where I am coming from on my logic on hunting regulations that should be changed to improve the experience of hunting.  Much like taking away anchored putters from golfers as technology changes!  As I write that might not happen for pro-golfers…  In their case they still got to get it in the hole!

Sweet Baby James, as his peers called him in the days of his professional boxing is a very good friend of mine.   This past year I got permission for him and his brother to hunt a few days on a small place in rural Oregon in the Willamette Valley to bow hunt for Columbia Blacktail Deer on the late season archery hunt.   His brother was successful in getting a deer for meat and made a great 12 yard shot on the deer.  James would remain un-successful until the last week of the season.

Readers should know that the Columbia Blacktail deer is one of the hardest to hunt and I do believe they are even more nocturnal that the elusive Whitetail deer.  In the Pacific Northwest low light comes earlier than some areas with the heavy brush cover and deep canyons.   Oregon is a mountainous state and Blacktail deer range from 10,000 feet to sea level.  I sometimes feel that the canyons can range the same in footage.   Those that have never hunted in the habitat that Blacktail frequent with the creepers on the ground, blackberries, thistle and deadfall are in for an experience.

As I said before many know James as Sweet Baby James, the professional boxer from Oregon, who has fought clear to Madison Square Gardens, knowing the likes of Ali.  He came from a background, whose father was a world ranked Archer, who should have been in the Olympics 1968, but because took a prize of 73 bucks, he later would be turned away at the Olympic Trials thus not allowed to shoot for the United States of America.   Hmm!  A great deal has changed over the years in that aspect.  He was a good friend of Fred Bear and shot Fred Bear traditional bows before the compound came out.  So growing up with a father that expected the best from his son, James became a great fighter, archer and hunter himself.

It is now Tuesday evening and he is in the treestand about 2 ½ hours prior to the end of shooting time.  He had not been in the stand for very long when from the northern sector of the property he could see a big Blacktail Buck working its way through the maze of vine maple, blackberries and ferns, at 40 yards he could see the buck was the Odd 3 X 3 that seldom entered this area.   Over the course of 6 months I would say the Odd 3 X 3 has been on camera about 20 times in this area.  The buck seems to be on a mission and a direction he was heading for in hindsight would be the deep canyon leading to another property.  The buck did not stop; thou he was walking down the trail to the flat, James made the decision to take the shot at 18 yards with focus and direct eye contact on the boiler room.   The arrow tipped with a 100 grain Thunderhead hit the buck hard a bit back from the heart, which appeared to be in upper lung area.   He could see the arrow hanging out on the opposite side of the buck.  The buck in an instance dug with his hooves and vaulted into forward motion with head down and not missing a step.

James could hear the noise of the buck on the gravel road and anticipated the buck would come around his backside and he would see movement in the trees…

James waited some 30 minutes before leaving the treestand to look for the buck with about an hour of light left to find his trophy Blacktail Buck.   He finds one speck of blood in the dirt, but nothing in the gravel.   There are no tracks to follow as from both sides of the road there is nothing but blackberries and heavy brush.  He felt the buck had entered back behind him and headed into another creek bottom to the east.

I get phone call James while I am down at the coast asking for help, “sorry James but I am long ways away” “did you check to the west of the road”.   Of course it started to rain when he got out of the treestand and there is not going to be any trace of blood to follow.  With no tracks or blood trail and heavy cover James still continues to look for three hours with a flashlight and no help.  Without an extra set of eyes it most difficult on your own to find a downed animal while in panic mode.   If it was legal in Oregon to have a lighted nock on your arrow, James might have seen the travel of the deer through the brush.   More likely if the arrow had fallen out he could see the arrow from an elevated point near the area if he could have used a lighted nock in Oregon.

The next day James looks for more than four hours, but if there was any blood it would be washed away by the rain.   A very distraught hunter not being able to find a big buck that should have gone a very short distance from the hit! If it had been legal in Oregon, an expandable-mechanical broadhead might have help greatly on stopping the buck or leaving a blood trail at the gravel road.

Over the course of months and going out to the farm, this included me to look for the buck’s remains, along with looking for drops we never could find the buck, but still knowing he went down on the property since he was hit hard.

Just recently after going through the winter and the deer moving through the farms or lands in the area, they have made many worn trails.   So this past week in March 2013, I told my son that James’s buck headed to the west canyon a normal route for him to escape.  So with our minds intent on finding the remains, we ventured out.   In know less than 100 yards from the treestand Jr., finds the arrow.  Noted the brush is bare foliage and the blackberries have no leaves on them.   The arrow is completely intact right along the game trail.   Next thing was to scan and split up with me working the lower eastern edge of the canyon and Jr. going to the flat on the western edge of the canyon.  He spots something about 150 yards away, then loses sight and said it must have been a deer.  I tell him to continue to the spot as it is probably what we wanted to find. Low and behold it is the Odd 3 X 3 Blacktail buck.   The coyotes had taken care of the deer and closure was made for all that have hunted the place.

Recovery of the rack is illegal in Oregon, so it will stay until it skull denigrates or grows into a tree ornament as it mends into the V of a tree. Thus only pictures are taken for remembrance of the hunt.

I know myself if I had been shooting an expandable-mechanical broadhead, I might have made a fatal hit on the buck I shot with the arrow passing through the buck and not hitting a vital in front shoulders.  Ok!  He has survived the winter and will be bigger next year as I have vendetta to harvest him.

From my understanding OPS Game Officers have talked and feel that there would be greater recovery on big game with expandable-mechanical broadheads and lighted nocks.   Over 44 other states allow lighted nocks.  All but three states allow the use of expandable-mechanical broadheads.  Oregon, Washington and Idaho have an issue, it is said by some that crossbow users are the problem, but in Oregon they are not allowed…

Did I mention that in Oregon you can use any arrow or broadhead for Game Birds though?  It is said that light nocks and expandable-mechanical broadheads will lead to poaching!  Give me a break, only the stupid would poach at night, thinking they might get away with it.  Poachers are going to do what they do until they get caught.  In Oregon the O.S.P. Game Officers are very talented and educated.  It may take a while but they run a high successful rate on catching the big game poachers.  Poachers should have a clue by now because there are so many trail cams on private and public property out there that the bucks and bulls have names.

Just watch the Outdoor Channel and you see that on every program.

Sort of funny while looking for the buck, we see the landowner and talk about who has access.  She had told us she allow a couple of guys that do business with her they could come out and get some ornamental plants, but said to them “oh we have cameras all over the property”, one of them said “Hmm, I hope you didn’t catch us by a tree..”  They were surprised that the land had surveillance…

Technology in archery or bow hunting has been improved, but the principal of archery and bow hunting remains the same.  You have to be able to hit the target with your talents.  The recovery of game should be in the balance for the hunter, thus I feel that using light nocks and expandable-mechanical broadheads with lead to greater recovery of game.  I am all for a change here in Oregon, as well as everyone that are known in my circles.

Oregon, Washington and Idaho should get out of the dark ages and move forward to the betterment of the sport.

I did do a quick P & Y field measurement on the buck.  To bad he was odd!  He netted out at 92 after setting in the brush for 4 months.  He had 15 inches of penalty with the odd rack.  He has nice symmetry when viewing straight on, most interesting buck…  You would need 95 to make P & Y for Columbia Blacktail!

In closing how many of us can shoot out to 40-50 yards and hit the target, yet miss an easy 20 yard shot?

This is a picture of the Odd 3 X 3 in the velvet.  He would be arrowed within 5 yards of this spot!
This is a picture of the Odd 3 X 3 in the velvet. He would be arrowed within 5 yards of this spot!
This is how the buck was found some 300 yards line of sight from the target area
This is how the buck was found some 300 yards line of sight from the target area

Bwana Bubba aka Cobra

Here he is after rubbing off his velvet in the area!
Here he is after rubbing off his velvet in the area!

 

 

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 04 Mar 2013

Bwana Bubba’s Thoughts – Advantage of Single Pin Moveable Globe Sight

Bwana Bubba’s Hunting Advantage

A quality single pin moveable bow sight!

As you can see, the pin is easy to see and when looking through the peep sight, you have great viewing and the eye is directed to the pin!

As you can see, the pin is easy to see and when looking through the peep sight, you have great viewing and the eye is directed to the pin!

Over the course of some 50 years of shooting bows, from the first re-curve to my latest bow, which is the fastest that I have ever had the privilege to shoot,  I’ve also had a number of bow sights during this time span that worked well with the technology of the bows that I was using.

Let’s talk about the past for a few moments with shooting a bow and how it all started in the 20th Century for me and others of the same age bracket.

The first of course was the arrow or arrow tip itself, which I shot from a traditional bow.

I learned from a single pointed object and angle of the shaft to shoot instinctively and became quite accurate up to ranges of 40-50 yards.  There was one time during my early Navy days that I was at a small caliber range giving instruction to other sailors on how to shoot rifles and gun safety.   I had my Martin Re-Curve bow, 30” Port Orford cedar shaft and 125 grain glue on target tip with me and told my Commanding Officer that I could hit the 10 ring on a 22 caliber 50’ target which was set out to 20 yards.   I think the bet at the time was a dollar!  To everyone’s amazement I hit the 10 ring dead center.  That was the only shot I took, as we were there for instruction of shooting rifles…

Time to get to the point and that is many of use learned how to shoot instinct and were very accurate in doing so and estimating yardage to hit a target or game.

While I was still shooting my Martin Re-Curve I once attached a multiple pin sight to see what it was about.  I drilled holes into the side of the bow and attached the sight.  Using my anchor point I did find it to be accurate and easier to use.

Soon in the late 70’s came the compound bow into my life and I was quick to buy one.  I do remember that my first compound was the Martin Cougar Magnum.  The Cougar was the state of the arc in bows.   That was the first time that I had met Chuck Linde of Windy Linde’s Bow Shop in Portland, Oregon on 82nd Ave.  He had racks of them in his shop and everyone that I knew wanted the Martin Cougar Magnum, even my cheap skate cousins bought them…

It was a lot faster than my Re-Curve, so the Re-Curve was put in the rafters.   By now I had multiple pins on my new adventurer in the art of harvesting Deer, Elk, Coyotes and Pronghorn in Oregon.

Sometime in the later 80’s I stepped up on my Martin bows and went to a sight that could handle a much faster bow.  It was also at the time I quit shooting fingers and went to a release!  I remained very loyal to the manufacturer of the bow sight, a good friend of mine Mel Stanaslaski.   The pins were set-up to be rotated at an angle to the bow, allowing vision of closer set pins for the speed of the bow.  It was a rock sold machine sight with pins that we would use radium glow in the dark paint.

In 2010 and 2011, I would find myself hunting for Blacktail deer in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, having found a land owner that would allow me and my son to hunt his property for deer.   So many years I would drive by the place on my way to my job that was 54 miles from my home.   I never realize the amount of deer between the job and my home in rural Oregon.   Go figure!   It only took one evening just prior to dark, to realize that this one place held more than 15 bucks in just one area.

In the past I was always hunting in Eastern Oregon for Mule Deer and Rocky Mtn. Elk in more open area with more light.

Low light and not having lighted pins made it most difficult to get on the deer fast enough and judge which pin to use in quick time frame.  Blacktail deer do not hold still very long and are on the move quickly.  I kept using his sight until I received my new 2012 Martin Onza 3 bow from Terry Martin.   It was time to move up to a lighter, short and faster bow with 85% let-off.   I do have to say it is the fastest bow, but more important is very accurate and smooth to shot with no vibration on release of an arrow.

I now decide to go to more modern fiber optic 5 pin bow sight.  The sight was recommended and I had a budget for outfitting the new Martin Onza 3 bow.  I had it dialed in from 10 yards to 80 yards, using the 60 yard pin based on holding approximately a foot above a target’s center to make the hit at 80 yards.   This was done with ease and confidence!

Now this was on a target and setting me up to make the shot.  It was not in the field with a live animal, this test would come in 2012 a couple of weeks into the Oregon Archery season.

Ironic that during the 2012 hunting season, it was also my first time to use a tree stand.  Considering that the projected set-up range for harvesting a deer would be at 25 yards, I was dialed in and the sight worked very well in the low light just prior to the end of legal shooting time.  The real test of my skills would come on a day I was bored with the tree stand and I did a spot and stalk shot and estimated the yardage and did not use the pin for 60+ yards, but used the 40 yard pin as it was a different color and became a focal point on the animal which was later measured at 63 yards.  I instinctively judge the yardage to be more than 50 yards and put the 40 yard pin above the deer’s back at approximately 4-5 inches over his back.

The point being I was able to focus on one pin as it stood out, I knew what it was set for, making it easy for me to make the shot.

As some of use get older it can be difficult to always make the right call on pins as they blend in with low light.  In the State of Oregon lighted bow sights or pins are not allowed.

Another thing that happens when hunters get older the eyesight does change on most.  Some have to have bi-focal, tri-focal, reading glasses, wear glasses for correction near and far.  Then there are those that have to take off their glasses to see up close, causing with rifle sight and bow sights some conflicts when using.  We just get slower and I have seen it on the new outdoor channels when hunters are getting ready to make a shot and it takes forever.  Reality it sometimes takes longer to get it done!

I would have to say I have found an answer that will help many with the problem caused by the aging of the eyes.

At the first of the year I contacted the Number 1 bow sight manufacturer on the recommendation of an old hunting partner who the year before had decided he needed a change.   I asked in the form of a letter about their movable sight.   At first I thought I still wanted multiple pins on the movable sight.   I am very thankful that a left handed multiple pin sight was not available.   I thought to myself of the hunt that I had in 2012, said to C.H. “a single pin is what I really want.”

Thus a new Optimizer Single Pin Movable Sight shows up at my home.   The sight is very easy to set-up on the bow with two (2) screws holding it on the bow and two (2) screws holding the fiber optic surround scope on the bracket.  Another big deal with the Optimizer is that the quiver bracket attaches to the sight bracket and the screws were in the Optimizer packaging.  Outstanding!  One more thing to think about is the fact that only two (2) different Allen Wrenches attached the Optimizer to the Onza 3.

The sight can be sighted in old school by marking the shooting yardages on the bracket as you shoot the normal yardages that one is shooting.  Or you can use the patent scientific sight-in system that company gives you in the package with sight-in tapes and final yardage tapes.  One would shoot the bow at 20 yards and dial the bow in, then work your way out to 60 yards and dial the bow in.  With the sight-in tape you would subtract the numbers on the tape and come up with the tape by number that will have you dialed in from 20 up to 80 yards depending on the bow.  I know that a number of my GPS hunters are very technical and would have a great day setting up a new Optimizer sight on their bow.

After getting the first sight-in done at 20 yards it is very easy to understand the advantage to the Globe Fiber Optics single pin moveable sights.   First advantage is that you focus on one pin, without thought.  It allows the perafel part of our eyesight to take in the object you are shooting at, yet stay focus at the point of impact aim.

Once the sight is dialed in, there are so many advantages to using the single pin movable sight for me that I will make the shots that I take count.   If using a tree stand and have the target area sighted in for set-up of taking your game, you can set the single pin for the yardage.  Thus you will be focused on a single pin and single animal, leaving nothing to distract the eye.  If the animal happens to be at a different distance than what you are sighted in at and you are not able to pull up a range finder, you can move the movable bracket without notice.  Yes! You are estimating the yardage, but then again we can feel that you are making a golf shot on the approach to the hole!

Now if I am going to do the spot and stalk method which I prefer, I will have the sight set at 40 yards, knowing what my bow will do from that yardage in or out on the target.  Practicing at different distances with the 30 or 40 yard pin will give confidence on the shots that I might not be able to range finder in.   Another words I will be back to being able to shoot instinctive when needed.  Being able to be in combat mode without great thought one can get the job done.  It is no different with the Optimizer sight than it is with a rifle scope with a duplex or mil-dot reticule.   The eye focuses to the center of the reticule, with the Optimizer the eye centers to the pin.

Even with the younger generation, it is a plus to learn how to shoot instinctive for conditions that don’t allow the time to range find in your target.   The bow sight for bow hunters is just the solution to success in the field!

I do feel that a bow sight that is made in the U.S.A. and has the same Lifetime Warranty as my bow has the same qualities will fit all bow hunters’ needs.

Over the years, as I have been guilty of it myself is to buy an expensive bow or firearm and then not put on the best sight.   Learning early in my life, plus running a successful sporting goods store, that set-up and the quality of the product leads to more success in the field or on the range.  Just think of how much you put into the arrow and broadhead.  The last broadhead’s I bought cost me 10 bucks a piece and the arrow is 10 bucks.   My Weatherby 30-378 cartridge only cost 8 bucks a round.   So spend the money for the best sight you can get for your bow!

In closing when using the Single Pin Movable Sight and having a great bow, if one misses it will always be operator error, as the equipment is without flaw in my option.

Bwana Bubba aka Frank Biggs

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 11 Feb 2013

Bwana Bubba’s 1987 Rancho Rajneesh Deer Hunt

Me and my pink vanes!  This is how I found the buck!

Me and my pink vanes! This is how I found the buck!

It was extremely hard for the team to stop hunting the Rancho Rajneesh, it was an addiction!

It is about time that I share this story with my readers and friends with all the facts.   It happen a few years back, lets say some 25 years ago, (which feels yesterday), during an opening day bow hunt in Central Oregon in the Grizzly Hunt Unit for Mule deer.

The story is of humor, comedy of errors, or just plain hunting!

We would be hunting the Rancho Rajneesh again or better known to the locals as “The Big Muddy” we spent a great deal of time over there, glassing, scouting and taking pictures of the deer and elk that thrived in the area.   On this hunt I would be accompanied by one of my hardcore hunting partners Dave Brill who is a very accomplish bow and rifle hunter.   On this trip I actually let someone else drive their truck.   This would work out greatly for me at the end of the hunt. “Dave it looks like I won the toss, so I get first shot at a Mulie buck” “Ok! Bubba, even if it is my truck and all!”   “Ya! Dave, like you would let me drive your truck?”  That was a great line to use, but the next day, I would have his truck while he hunted…  I needed to get the deer meat into cold storage in Madras, Oregon.  One of the grocery stores in town had a separate locker for game meat!

Again we would be hunting one of our favorite spots in Central Oregon, which would be outside of Donnybrook, Oregon on the south side of the Rancho Rajneesh.   There was a couple of parcels we found ourselves going back too every year, as it was B.L.M., yet tied to a couple of ranches that we could pass through and sometimes hunt.   Ah!  You are wondering of the spot, well I will give you the spot of big bucks as near Hinkle Butte!  Old man Crowley (Raymond) was a great man to know in the area!  You could find him on his front porch at his home in Donnybrook along Gosner Rd.   He had a number of parcels that bordered the BLM in the “Big Muddy Ranch.”  This gave a save access into the BLM without being noticed.   We were able to keep are secret spots to ourselves for over a 20 year time frame.

This land is now owned by Young Life and a real estate broker in three separate parcels.

We had spotted a number of bucks during our trip into the area for the evening hunt.  The morning hunt was a bust for both of us!  I love to hunt the evening, as most everyone else has settled back down into their camps.  It does not bother me to hike out in the dark when I am deep into the interior of B.L.M.; usually the evening is from about 1330 on.   If I look back over the years I have probably harvest more game from 1300 until dusk!  Figuring that big bulls and big bucks need to stretch a bit after their mid-day nap!

Let’s get back to the story, as I stated earlier, we had seen a number of bucks on the way in.  As we were approaching the honey spot, I notice a real dandy buck up on the hill with what I figured at about a 29” outside spread and heavy racked.   Hunt on, as I roll out the truck and took off with my pack, pack frame, crackers, light sweater, Leupold binoculars, camera, new Martin Onza bow, and Kershaw knives!   Oh! Did I mention that I forgot water in my pack?  The buck is working up the hillside and not knowing that I am behind him I figured.  So quiet that I am in the stalk of this “Big Muddy” buck.   He is working up in front of me through the Junipers, rocks and Sagebrush still in view at about 90 yards.  I feel that I am closing the distance quickly and when I get within 40 yards I will just let him have it when I grunt at him and get him to swing broadside. As I turn the corner of the ridge I was working up he has disappeared, “what no way he is gone.”  The wind was coming down the ridge into my face; I just missed seeing him turn into the draw…

Got over that little trip in the mind and decide to continue the hunt at a place we called the swamp.  

As I approach the swamp, I see a lone buck standing at the edge of the water with lots of cover to work into him.   The buck is not very wide, but tall and extremely heavy with abnormal points.   As I get ready to drill him at 35 yards (he has no clue I am behind him), out of the corner of my left eye, I see about 25 bucks starting to get up in another part of the swamp in the cattails at about 45 yards.  They were now in full line of sight.   I swung onto this buck that was pushing 30” who was just standing their broadside looking me, as were all the rest.   Easy shot and I took the shot, only to see it hit the only branch of Sagebrush sticking up at the boiler room.  The arrow of course deflected and cut the hair off the top of the buck’s back.  He gave me a smile and just walked off into the direction sun and they all stood out at 70 yards on the open hill side!  “A bird in the hand is worth how many birds in the bush?” I would have say that was pretty wild and not ever going to be repeated in my lifetime of so many bucks taking a bath together at one time.  I found a few empty Ivory Soap wrappers at the waters’ edge…

I am now over that experience also and moving on as I had more ground to cover and see what was out there.  

I move alone a Juniper tree line and spot 6 good bucks, one being swamper in a small basin at about ¼ mile away.  To run the game down to within 100 or so yards, then put the final stalk on was great enjoyment for me.  Mule deer with enough cover are pretty easy to sneak up on.  I get to Juniper and Sagebrush along a B.L.M. cross section fence line that was next to the small barren basin which is about 50 yards from the deer.   You wonder about the 50 yards and all!  I used my range finder the wheel type and it said 50 yards to the big buck.   I took a picture of the big boy also!  You’re saying how many big bucks can this guy find? Well it was un-real, but real.  The big bucks were there and everywhere around the area within a 50 mile circle.  Alright being skeptical of my dial a wheel range finder (just got it), I felt the buck was no more than 40 yards as I drew back and shot through the brush, I should have believed the range finder, as the buck must have been 50 yards, as I watch arrow past under his belly.

Almost!  Horseshoes anyone?

Now I am really bummed out about this whole hunt and rushing into the hunt and not believing first thoughts.   Well there was still some day light left and I never give up until it is illegal to shoot.

I am now up on the plateau glassing down into another basin.   All of a sudden I see a single buck at about 1000 yards out.  I figure he is about 25” to 26” wide and a pretty good looking buck, plus the fact it about time to get the job done.  He is feeding in the middle of the basin, but I could see that he was working towards the West.  In his path of travel it would lead him past a big pile of dead Juniper trees.

This is another reason we keep coming back.  Michael James took this picture during the opening day of archery, but in another one of our spots.  He was a rifle hunter, that love to scout when we were archery hunting...

This is another reason we keep coming back. Michael James took this picture during the opening day of archery, but in another one of our spots. He was a rifle hunter, that love to scout when we were archery hunting…

Hunt on, as I race to cover ground and get on the buck.  Getting within a quarter mile of the spot that I would ambush the buck, I drop my pack frame.   With only my Martin Onza (first run production Onza) I raced to the pile of dead junipers.  I was completely invisible (another words he had not clue I was standing in the open and waiting for him) from where I was standing, yet I could see his rack as he moved along the pile.  I went to full draw and had the 30 yard pin on the spot I figured he would come to once he cleared the pile.  It is great that he covered the distance in a short period of time as the Onza had a draw weight of #90.  It was mental thing in those days of bow hunting to have the biggest and baddest bow made! In the 21st Century my new Onza 3 with a draw weight of 72 is most likely about 100 fps faster than my first Onza and it was a hottest bow in the 20th Century! (Yes, I know believed the range finder and mentally plugged in points of yardage.)  As he cleared the pile and was broadside to me, yet was still feeding, I let my fingers do the work.   As the XX75 2317 26 1/2” with a 125 gr. Brute 3 in flight the buck look straight at me into my sunglasses (he heard the bow, but it was too late for him).  That was the last time I saw his eyes looking at me, as to my amazement the arrow hit him dead center in the mouth.   “You got to be kidding me”, as the buck jumped over the side of the rim that I didn’t know was even there.  I thought to myself as the light was fading, what I am going to do now?   I set my bow down on the rim and started to glass in to the bottom of the canyon.  It took me about 2 panic minutes to spot him hunkered up in the bottom (arrow went down this throat about 12 inches).   Ok! I have found him, but I don’t have my pack frame or camera.   I took off on a dead run to where I left my pack frame and ran right back to the rim.   It took me another 90 seconds to remember where I left my Martin Onza.  Finally I get myself down to the buck, take pictures as no one is going to believe this shot.   I give the buck my “Hawaiian Cut” which puts him in quarters with the removal of backstrap and tenderloins.   This is the only way I field dress big game, fast (30 minutes on a deer) and there is little blood!  I get as much as I can on the pack frame along with the head and cape.

Strange Rack on this buck, with a double left beam.

Strange Rack on this buck, with a double left beam.

I have to climb out of the bottom and head back to the truck that would be waiting for me I hoped.  It would be about 3 miles line of sight to get back and light was fading fast, real fast.   There was a great deal of cheat grass and it made it possible to see for a while.   I had decided to take a short cut to the road, which would be a mistake for me.  It was now dark and dark, as the thunder heads over the John Day River were settling in.  Thunder and Lighting now was everywhere, plus it started to rain.  When the sky would light up I would move towards the direction of my pickup spot.  I could see the micro wave tower light and that helped me for a while.  I then lost all the grass and got into just rocks.  I could no longer go forward in reaching the truck or Dave. I had lost the lighting as it would move further east towards Mitchell, Oregon.

I was going to have to spend the night out in the weather with only a light sweater on.   Did I mention that I had forgotten water, now I needed it for sure after eating the crackers?  The crackers were pretty dry.  It was a good thing that I trained in the desert on running missions with no water… The temperature had now dropped and my sweater was not enough at this point.   I hate DIRT, (did I say I hate dirt?) but knew the only way I was going to make until morning, was to hunker down under a low hanging Juniper and bury myself in the dirt (dust).  Though it was raining it would not last very long, as the storm had past.  That is just what I did; waking up about every two hours to see if light had come finally over the John Day River.   It was probably about 5:30 AM when I woke up again and could see a hint of sun coming over the hills above the John Day River.  There was not a cloud in the sky now with only the sun to show up for the day!

Later in the day the temperature reaches about 98 degrees, same the first day. I was now up and getting the pack frame on with most of the buck attached.   It was a good thing I did not try to venture further during the night; I surely would have found myself in the bottom of narrow rock crevice for life.  There was no way that I would have seen the edge and would have fallen to the bottom.  Making it out to the dirt road, out of no where, Dave and his truck appeared.  Dave had driven the dirt road hitting the horn once in a while until about midnight, and then parked off the road until morning; he figured I would be ok with my military background!

Dave's Buck from the last weekend!

Dave’s Buck from the last weekend!

I told Dave it was time for him to hunt the elk he had seen while he was coming up the road.  I could get the front quarters out later in the afternoon! Dave never got on the elk again, but at the end of the season we went back to our spot and he killed a great buck!  That will be another story, but I will let you see Dave’s buck from the last weekend of the archery season in 1987!

Morale of the story:  Be Prepared – Have a Trusting Friend

 

 

This is why we hunted the Grizzly Unit in the day!  This is a great 37" buck taken!

This is why we hunted the Grizzly Unit in the day! This is a great 37″ buck taken!

 

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by Frank Biggs on 22 Jan 2013

Bwana Bubba’s Blacktail Bucks in January

EVEN 3 X 3 BLACKTAIL BUCK MAKES IT THROUGH THE 2012 HUNTING SEASON

I thought I would share my latest pictures that were pulled from my one trail camera that I have left on a crossing area in the rural part of Oregon City, Oregon.  This is agricultral land, with parcels of land running from a couple of acres to a few hundred arces.  The Columbia Blacktail is quite the deer in that most of the time they are very nocturnal and will come out ususally during the fall season, just at dark!

I have had access to this land for about three years (3) and in the 2012 I did a few things different on the land.   It was the first time to ever put up a tree stand and install cameras in key areas.  It is also legal to put out apples or other feed for the deer to feed on.

Prior to 2012 I would use Blackberry bushes for cover and making ground blinds, or just do the spot and stalk on Blacktail Bucks.

So 2012 from about May and through the season, I not longer would spot deer and stalk prior to the Oregon Archery season to take pictures or videos’.   I chose to see what had come into the trail cameras instead and try not to distrub the game at much.  It was most interesting with as many as 12 bucks moving in and around the trails.

I had name 3 of the Blacktail bucks during the time prior to the opening day, such as Even 3 X 3, Odd 3 X 3 (this buck had both eyeguards, but the forks were different with one side the fork on the left was on the main beam and on the right on back).  He was a real big buck and looking straight on he looked symmetrical.  Then there was Stickers, who was a very big 3 x 3 with eyeguards and a point coming off the back.

The following group of pictures from the 1-13-13 to 1-20-13.  I had put out 100 lbs of feed and some carrots.    I was a bit surprise from the amount of pictures that were taken.   I had different 6 bucks coming in off and on.  I have not seen the big buck the Odd 3 X 3 with eyeguards now for about 2 months…  I do feel that he had been harvested by a bow hunter.  And Stickers was taken during the special Willamette 615 Rifle Tag.
The following pictures of Even 3 X3 with rack,  Odd 3 X 3 and Stickers got harvested during the season.   What was interesting is that I put grain down for the first time in 3 months.  It surprised me to have 1200+ pictures in 7 days in the winter on the property.  The deer have been seen using another field that is across the road from this property on the back-side.  To keep this short I left out a couple of the other bucks.  The dropping of the rack was not on camera, but pictures were about a 12 hours difference from when he had his rack and then it was gone.   The weather is not permitting the finding of the sheds at present.
One other thing is that in some of the night shots, the other bucks were sparring over the food or dominance.  Maybe they will knock off a antler or two!
This next year I should still have access to this property and it will be interesting when the bucks gather on this property in the Spring of 2013 how many new comers and carry-over bucks are on the place.  Even 3 X 3 should be a great Blacktail Buck in 2013.
It should be noted that out of the 12 bucks, not one 4 x 4 was present, though the years prior big 4 x 4’s were seen, but only at 450 yards at dusk against the tree lines.    Frank Biggs aka  Bwana Bubba Continue Reading »
0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by admin on 11 Jan 2013

How fast do you really want your bow to be? By Terry Martin

How fast do you really want your bow to be?

   By Terry Martin

Over the last 40 years, I have personally tested thousands of bows.

In addition, I have reviewed hundreds of test results and reviews written for articles.

In the early years of the compound bow, truth is many good recurves were faster than most compounds. In the early years compound bows’ let-off made it easier to hold at full draw. However, the durability and performance was not what it is today. It would be similar to comparing the Model T to cars of today.

An archer needs to consider several things when choosing between a traditional or compound bow. Many archers choose to shoot traditional bows for their simplicity and light weight, not to mention the tradition and enjoyment of shooting these classic designs.

Speed is great, however there is a price to pay. In early compound design, the energy was created by round eccentric wheels. These bows peaked at maximum weight for about 2 inches during the draw force curve of the bow.

Current cam have been designed so the bow draws with peaking almost as soon as you start drawing back and not letting off until almost full draw. This creates much more stored energy and a much faster bow.

Basically, the faster the bow the harder it will be to pull back. At full draw, however, the archer is only holding about 30 percent of the peak weight.

For comparisons, here are some examples of average speeds for different types:

Longbow 160 to 180 fps (feet per second)
Recurve 170 to 210 fps
Early compounds 180 to 240 fps
Current compounds with high performance cams 280 to 350 fps
Of course, it’s important to consider other changes made over the years like riser materials, better string material, improved limb technology, cam design, composite arrows and overall bow design.

Over the years, new bow designs, release aids and arrows have caused controversy.

I remember when I was 10 years old, many felt the bow sight was too much an improvement. The reality is you could tape a tooth pick on your sight window and have an advantage.

Release aids were an even bigger controversy. Some states banned release aids in the 1970s, but sales were as strong as states without a ban so the banning laws were quickly changed. The reality is the Turks used release aids hundreds of years ago.

You can imagine what a controversy the compound bow was. Many archers felt they would destroy archery. Some dealers refused to carry compounds. Since the traditional market died for several years after the introduction of compounds, shops that refused to sell anything except recurves and long bows did not survive.

Many manufacturers stopped production of traditional bows entirely. In the last 20 years, interest has returned and the traditional market has been increasing.

In today’s market, archers can choose whichever feels best to them and many shoot both.

Both have advantages — compound have more speed, which helps when judging yardage, they shoot flatter and allow the archer the advantage of misjudging the yardage by a greater distance and still hit the target; long bows and recurves have the advantage of simplicity and light weight.

You can have lot of fun no matter whatever you choose. Archery is a great family sport. Keep in mind, even if a bow is fast, if it’s not tuned or the archer isn’t able to handle the bow, you just miss at a faster speed! Visit a pro shop or watch the videos on www.ArcheryTalk.com to get started right.

Terry Martin grew up in the family archery business building arrows, accessories and shooting in tournaments from the age 6. In the early 1970s he began designing and patenting the first Martin compound bows. Many of the features are used throughout the industry today.

In 1997, he started Archerytalk.com the world’s largest online archery community.

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by admin on 27 Sep 2012

Bwana Bubba’s 2012 Archery Deer Hunt

Bwana Bubba’s 2012 Archery Deer Hunt
Sunday Morning Hunt

Making the Shot Buck!

Though this story will end up with harvesting of a small Blacktail Buck from the Willamette Valley in Oregon, it is more about the principles and aspects of aging in the hunting scenario.

I would like to say this is the buck of harvest, but not! Right Handed Tree Stand in background!
Over the years, especially when I was younger I lived to hunt and fish. I was very selfish and would spend most of my time either at work or doing the great outdoors. It was a total escapement from reality after serving in the U.S. Navy and being In Country. I found great excitement with chasing and harvesting game. My fishing was about how many fish I could catch, later finding it was more fun to catch and release.

Now later in life I find I do not have as much time to hunt and fish with the reality of still working into my 60’s. Weekends are a thing of the past since I have been in the RV selling business. Hunts have now turned to hunting in the valley close to home for the elusive Blacktail Deer.

What started with getting permission to take pictures of Blacktail Bucks on a parcel of land outside of Oregon City & Canby, Oregon has turned into the place to have the opportunity to harvest a Blacktail. The landowner himself is a Vietnam Vet and I know he finds great peace to be able to walk his timbered land and in some places be able to escape the daily grind!

This year was different from the past years on the M & L Ranch as I call it. It is the first time other than a Blackberry thicket blind, that I have setup a real tree stand and fixed ground blind. My thoughts have always been to glass, spot and pursue the game, with an occasional wait at a nearby waterhole for Pronghorn.

I had past him up at 40 yards, but this is not what I saw from 40 yards through the Blackberries!
The 2012 Archery Season in Oregon was of great expectations in harvesting one of the Big Three Blacktail bucks that we all had captured on Trail Cams. With Odd 3 X 3 leading the pack, “Sticker” second and finally the P & Y buck Even 3 X 3. You do notice that I have never mentioned a 4 x 4! I have yet to see a 4 point buck western count in 2012. In the past I have seen a number of them and have put them on film!

I truly hate to say it, but many of the big bucks I have seen have been poached. I have heard rifle shots in the familiar sound of hunting situation before the archery season and during the season. Poaching has become a major issue in Oregon! It can’t be about the meat, but about the rack.

P & Y Buck at probably 110″ Maybe JR can get him!
So with the missed opportunity on the Even 3 X 3 in the first couple of days really took me back mentally. The easiest shots, can most often not work! I am sure most know that deal in hunting. Having hit the tree stand rail not once but twice on the 25 yard shot was embarrassing for sure. Small note: WHEN PUTTING UP A TREE STAND AND SETTING UP THE LINE OF THE ANIMAL TO BE POSITION, MAKE SURE YOU PUT UP YOUR STAND IN RELATIONSHIP TO BEING LEFT HANDED OR RIGHT HANDED. In this case for me being Left Handed I should have put it across the path to the opposite tree. It is definitely a Right Handed tree stand. Guess I will have to get another one and put it on the opposite tree 25 yards across the path! My partner’s JR (Frankie) and Mark are right-handed! They had decided what tree to put the stand up before I can to help! Pretty smart guys!

As most of you know that are in the circle, with two weeks into the archery season had a second chance with a 20 yard shot on a nice heavy 3 x 3 at 20 yards (No Hesitation Either).

The one that also got away and survives another day! Flesh Wound!
I shot through the Camo mesh of the ground blind, leading to a close Kill shot (3”) to a glancing arrow hitting the shoulder and ricocheting upward and out. I have had someone call me unethical for not making this one buck the one find and harvest. In this case give me a break with a Blacktail and the odds, especially with a bow! Mark and myself spent 3 hours looking for blood on the buck, which ended with one final drop about 300 yards away in the dark at 2200. The following morning I spent another 3 hours and found no more blood on the ferns and what appeared to be a buck with normal walk back into the forest (no broken limbs or down branches).

Great shot on a Blacktail Buck – Martin Onza 3 on display also!
So in the following weeks the buck has been on trail cams in good health. In fact when Mark was in his tree stand with his rifle (Willamette 615 anything tag) the buck came to within 12 yards of him in good health. As this is another story of Mark’s buck that he took at that time, all I can say is the buck might have been a vendetta for me to get him, but I was not worried about his health any longer. Just a bad hit!

It is now Sunday September 9th in the morning about 0430 and my wife wakes me up and says “aren’t you going hunting this morning!” Na! I got to work and need my sleep! I am now awake and say to myself, I am gone. In minutes without combing my hair I headed out the door and into the darkness. Looking at my cell found I see JR.; my son left me text messages (10) about the morning hunting. I text back are you awake as I am already heading to my secure parking spot! No return text, guess I got the place to myself today! It would have been great to have him with me!

It does not take me long to get ready once there and I head off to the stand about ¼ from the parking spot. Quickly get up in the stand with the anticipation of a good hunt, as it cooler this Sunday. I figured I might get the spike and of course plus the one doe with twin fawns in first, with maybe a big boy coming in before 0700. I patiently wait, which is a major problem for me as it super quite in the draw. The only noises are the wind rusting the trees and occasional Scrub Jay squawking in the distance. I should add the lone owl hooting in the canyon!

It is now approaching 0700 with no movement at all on the forest ground, I am extremely bored and need to get on feet and make a ground hunt. I lower my bow and day pack to the ground, check the trail cam and see that only 6 pictures from the 12 hour period. I thought about heading back to the house and catch a few winks before work, but I would not get any sleep. I dropped the pack and headed over to Mark’s stand near the edge of the western sector of the farm. No movement in the heavy grasses and I surely did not jump anything, as Mark’s stand borders the field and heavy timber. Hmm!

I pick up my day pack and talked to myself and ask the question to drive around to the eastern sector and hunt from there and see if I can jump a Blacktail Buck. I tell myself to go back to the stand and head up the trail that leads to the dry creek bed and the eastern sector of the farm (most of us old war dogs talk to ourselves a lot). I decide that I wanted to go light on this expedition with only my bino’s, range finder and bow! I am wearing a Camo long sleeve shirt and I have my booties on as it is very noisy place to walk and think you are quiet when making a good stalk.

Here I am only about 200 to 300 yards from my stand on the trail and spot a doe that had just come up out of the draw that leads down to the creek bed and the other side of the farm. It is a warn trail now and used by the game since Frankie (JR) and his cousin had taken a D-6 Cat through the property, it has given a game when not disturb a bit easier route to feeding areas. There are places near the creek bottom that are so thick; I would have to eat the deer there!

Ok! I spot the doe and she is a ways out there, I would put her at about 50 yards line of sight. Not sure if she has caught me as slither back into the Scott Broom. I decide to range her in and use my left hand, my release hand. Shaking a bit, I target to the left of her to a small bush and it says 48 yards. I got the area pretty well dialed in and will wait to see what come out of the draw. Finally a very smart move on Cobra’s part! Her fawns that no longer have spots doodle along and up. I can not see the doe at all during this time and I assume she did not see me! Then I see a deer coming up, it stops and see it has a rack, I can not tell the size it all seems to blend into the background of brown grasses and the fir trees. Knowing what my Martin Onza 3 can do for me, I am at instinct mode and without though of size or distance my eyes as they are looking through the peep side have the orange 40 yard pin set about 1-2 inches above the back bone. The release is very smooth and no hesitation on my part. I see the arrow in flight as the Norway Zeon Fusion (pink) vanes are evident in flight.

I love the way these beauties fly and glow for me!
The buck has moved forward during the short time of flight of the arrow. “Damn” is all I could say when I see the arrow hit the hind quarter forward. What surprised me was to see the deer drop like a sack of bricks and then he shook! Wow! Then to my further surprise the buck go back up and struggled into the Scott Broom. Out in the distance at about 100 yards there is a monster buck facing directly at me when I stepped out to lay the bow down! I quickly move up to the spot and find blood. I marked the spot with my bow and head back to the day pack to get what I needed. I call my JR and to my surprise he answers his phone! Hoorah! He is on his way with his truck that he can get back there and not be upset with the blackberries scrapping the side of his truck. I do check at my launching point and range find to the spot the buck was initially standing at and it hits 63 yards.

I have a head in this picture! Keep it clean! I still have the ability to shoot some distance!
I have to tell you that during the flight of the arrow, there seem to be little arch (trajectory) in the flight. What a strange feeling of watching the flight which was under a second, like out of a movie! The Martin Onza 3 is most likely pushing 330fps with my setup! Outstanding performance for me! Martin bows have never failed me on a hunt!

I have pulled my rig near the stand, hoof back to the area with cameras and my Gerber’s. I did not have to go very far from the hit spot, the blood trail was extensive and the buck was stretched out about 80-100 yards from the impact area. I could see the buck is one that I had seen on camera and past up an evening before when I went to the stand and had him at 40 yards. He was a young 3 X 3 or better 3 X 2 with no eye guards.

I was in combat mode during this time period of spot and shoot. I truly love to spot, stalk and then kill! I have found that the times in the field with difficult shots and I go to combat instinct mode the job usually gets done. I do not think about anything, but the mind has allowed me to react! One can read a book call “Blink” and understand what I am saying. Thinking about a situation to much, I feel that you can make a dumb mistake! Let me tell you I have made mistakes and failed number of times. Being on the ready at all times makes for success.

The arrow did hit his hind quarter on the right side, failed to pass through. During the Hawaiian Field Dressing operation I could see what had happen and I am most surprised, as I have never seen this before. I failed to mention that JR had given me a package of new broadheads to try and just that morning I did put one on my arrow. The broadhead does not look like it could be as effective or un-effective as the Thunderheads I had on the rest of the arrows. The name of this broadhead is Slick Trick 100 gr. Magnum.

This is a picture of the Slick Trick 100 gr. Magnum after hitting the ball and socket!
So during the Hawaiian field dressing using one of my gifted Gerber Gator knives I find that if the arrow had passed through there would have been pumping out even great flow of blood, but what happen once the arrow hit the flesh it angled back and somewhat down hitting the knuckle in the hip joint pulverizing the ball joint. I have never seen this done to an animal with a Broadhead in all my years of bow hunting. I have seen ribs cracked or cut, but for the arrow to go through that much tissue and still do that at the range of 60 yards is simply amazing. As you know at this time I will be changing in the future to Slick Trick Broadhead. Another thing that arrow flew as straight as if I had shot at 10 yard target. My Onza 3 highly tuned, as all my Martin bows have been. Reminds when I tried Barnes X bullets 225 grain in my Weatherby 340 on an elk hunt and took out the bull at 1000 yards approx (testimonial proof) and he dropped in his tracks. I have never looked back on using the product. Knowing that the product will do the job, if there is a mistake it is usually the hunter! It can be equipment also if you don’t check and make sure it ready to shoot! So my deer hunting for 2012 has come to an end and I now can if time permits to focus on elk or help JR get his archery buck in the State of Oregon!

 

Bad Behavior has blocked 1009 access attempts in the last 7 days.