Archive for the 'Bowhunting' Category

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Published by mountainarchery on 14 Mar 2012

St. Jude Children’s Hospital Archery Benefit

Mountain Archery of Gruetli-Laager, TN will the hosting their 3rd Annual St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Archery Tournament June 23rd and 24th.  All proceeds of this tournament will be donated to this hospital. We raised $2500.00 last year  with over 80 shooters. We want to get the word out to the archery  community  to hopefully raise more money for these kids.  We will have 20 McKenzie Targets situated on a nature trail, pop out novelty, plywood buck novelty, turkey trio novelty,  5 day Kansas Bow Hunt Drawing, bows to raffle, deer target door prize, prizes signed by some of the pros, and refreshments.  Check out our schedule on www.mountainarchery3dshoots.com. If you can not come, please tell a friend. Thanks!!!

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Published by KurtD on 15 Feb 2012

THINK DEER – by Ted Nugent

THINK DEER                                                                                           by Ted Nugent

You can’t really close your eyes and read this, so instead, concentrate as you read and pump images of deer into your brain. Envision all those stunning beasts you have been so blessed to encounter over so many hunting seasons, and burn that beautiful picture deep into your cranium. Imprint it on your psyche, make it an actual element of your being. Now, doesn’t that feel good.

I am typing this little ditty in my Ranch King deer blind on a cold December afternoon, and I have eight whitetails in front of me right now, all within twenty yards. I sit spellbound.

An old matriarch doe is crazy alert, two doe fawns and a very handsome button buck with huge pronounced nubbins could care less as they nibble away. There is a yearling doe, a yearling three point buck, and a fat stud of a three year old eight point beast. They own me.

My heart is racing rather predictably, and I only keep typing because I am trying to convince myself to not shoot the handsome eight pointer.

Steady Uncle Ted. Steady as she goes.

For all the right reasons, I should kill that old doe as part of my Texas Parks and Wildlife Managed Land Deer Permit plan. We figure eight more does gotta go off our ground, and she’s an old gal that would be perfect to take out to better the herd. We shall see.

I really love hunting, ambushing and killing deer, love watching and videoing them, love being a natural part of their world, love grilling and eating them, really love sharing their sacred flesh with the regional Hunters for the Hungry program and the families of the US Military, but what turns me on the most is the intelligent, stewardship system by which we manage deer and all wild game for healthy, thriving populations and properly balanced conditions. By doing so, I can forever enjoy and celebrate all those other ways that I love deer.

I just looked up again from my laptop, and now there are ten deer. Another shooter doe and a scrawny spike horn buck arrived, and they are all bulking up on feed in the cold weather. They constantly look around and flinch at every bird, every breeze, and for many unknown reasons. What an amazing creature. I would propose that for millions and millions of us, our lives would be dramatically less enjoyable without deer. I know it has always been a powerful force of joy, inspiration and awe for me and my family.

The two big does just stood up on hind legs and went into that flurry of cartwheeling punches with their front hooves. That is some violent behavior right there, and any one of those cloven hooved blows could kill you outright. I am sure that while we are all conveniently tucked away in our cushy homes throughout the year, whitetail deer are knocking the living bejesus out of each other, including killing each other at a much higher rate that anyone really understands.

The button buck is way out of his league haranguing the old girl, as the rut is up and down for the last couple of months. I am real tempted to kill the puny spike and forkhorn, but at only one and a half years of age, their first set of antlers in no way provides a meaningful indicator of their genetic potential. Have you ever noticed that once we decide to not shoot a particular animal, that they pose perfectly broadside with their leg forward for the longest periods of time?

I just gulped a deep breath of freezing air, for a dynamo buckaroo just arrived on scene to take any deer hunter’s breath away. This majestic stag has ten perfectly defined points on his tall, wide, sweeping rack, and represents the kind of monster buck I would never have dreamed of coming in contact with growing up in the Midwest deer woods.

This incredible beast has no idea that a blood thirsty venison addict is only fifteen yards away in this dark blind, with a bow and arrow and razor sharp broadhead and the tags to go with them.

He noses the does and the other bucks give him lots of room, and with all the commotion, you couldn’t ask for a better opportunity to get to full draw on such a great deer. But I just gaze, video it all and type away, for though this buck’s antlers are very impressive and highly desirable, I can tell by his trim neck, brisket and body that he is only two and a half years old, the very definition of a quality deer management specimen to let walk.

I am so proud of myself. I am learning, and his presence literally increases my excitement just knowing such quality bucks are around. It wasn’t that many years ago that I would have killed him in an instant, but like so many other hunters these days, I know I can get all the venison I need by killing the right deer and letting the right deer grow to their potential.

Shooting light is gone now, all the deer have moved off, so I put away my vidcam, attach my quiver back on my bow and get ready to shut down my laptop, absolutely thrilled beyond words that I am a deer hunter. I head home with my soul filled with allthings deer.

Tomorrow in another day, and tomorrow is another deer. I will now fill my belly with some scrumptious backstraps and keep the spirit of the deer alive in everything I do.

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Published by KurtD on 15 Feb 2012

TEXAS TEN – by Ted Nugent

TEXAS TEN                                                                                 by Ted Nugent

 

I never really stop hunting. It is indeed a cherished, time honored lifestyle for me. A wonderful, totally alive, day by day celebratory outdoor lifestyle of great, deeply appreciated, heartfelt gratification. Self-sufficiency. Rugged individualism. Hands-on conservation. Private land ownership. Property rights. Privacy rights. Experimenting in “self-government”. We the people resource ownership and stewardship. The right to keep and bear arms. Live free of die. Don’t tread on me. Surely the ultimate American Dream the way I see it. Independent. Free. Self evident truth, God given right’s. Pursuit of happiness guaranteed. Perfect. You can’t do this in France.

 

The supremely enjoyable daily routines of checking my trapline, killing varmints, choosing and planting foodplots, running irrigation, positioning new deerstands, constructing groundblinds, upgrading old ones, checking fences and gates, filling waterholes and feeders, trimming shooting lanes, practicing with rifles, handguns, shotguns and bows, arranging and upgrading targets and ranges, training dogs and introducing new people to the joys of shooting, watching and studying wildlife and constantly strategizing ambush zones for my hunting clients, and more, are all chores and enjoyable outdoor activities that I really look forward to each day. Rocking my brains out nearly 100 concerts per year pretty much keeps me busy throughout the summer any way you cut it, so these wonderful activities which I live for in between rockouts do indeed keep me bright eyed and bushy tailed in a constant, energized way. When the actual official hunting season shows up in the fall of the year, my state of mind doesn’t need too much adjusting back to my natural predator mode and spirit. In fact, with the amazing year round hunting opportunities for exotic wildlife in my new adopted homestate of Texas, there are not any “No Hunting” days in my life. How cool is that? Godbless Texas, Godbless America and Godbless the beasts all!

 

Back in my ancestral homegrounds of Michigan, the seasonal changes are palpable. The air tastes different. Dramatic change is tangible. The planets do indeed realign and there is a mystically altered pulse in the wind. Ya gotta love that. Meanwhile, in the great Republic of Texas, one must routinely check the calendar so see if summer will ever end. Texas is hot. Usually hotter. For an old dyed-in-the-wool Michiganiac, it is a bit of a psychological adjustment to deal with all this blazing sunshine and brutal heat. But as a guitarplayer-cum-U.S. Marine, I can improvise, adapt and overcome with the best of them. And I do. There is no Plan B. It is time.

 

So it was, as the blistering fireball in the LoneStar sky grilled my inner being, nonetheless, the calendar read October and my spirit insisted on liftoff. All that dedicated boot time on my hunting grounds had kept me abreast of whitetail activity, and this day I chose a tall ladderstand nestled deep, and hidden within the green embrace of a tall pine tree overlooking a winding, rocky creek course amongst the thorny screen of greenbriar, assorted impenetrable tangles and relentless juniper. A line of huge, towering pecan and live oak trees made up the forest before and behind me, and with the gentle southwest breeze, my confidence ran high. It is always a roll of the hunter’s dice, but we had a full on backstrap mojo going on this day. I could feel it. You never know, but we always hope.

 

After a long wait, the eye-candy parade of beautiful, sleek, healthy does and fawns ghosted from the shadows as the sun dipped lower. Some of the whitetails were red, some brown, others slate grey. A few of the fawns still showed remnant spots, confirming that the breeding does indeed continue well into winter. Momentarily, a small forked horn, a spike and a fat, muscular, slick six joined the group. My elevated ambush hideout gave me a perfect viewing position to watch the group of 20 plus deer carryon undisturbed, and again provided me the greatest joy that is being a hunter. To be on the inside of their natural world has a powerful healing and calming effect on me, and I studied each animal in detail through my Yukon binoculars. Mutual grooming, prancing, kicking, nipping, licking, head butting, sparring, browsing and constantly examining their surroundings with an uncanny alertness entertained me completely. I love every minute of such encounters and it represents a prime allure to the great outdoors lifestyle. The critters never let you down and there is never a dull moment.

 

Early season bucks tend to hang out in bachelor groups, and the slight glint of bone through the scrub materialized into antlers as five stud boys emerged from the tangle down below. The first two were handsome 2-3 year old eight pointers, followed by a 3-4 year old 9, then another young eight. It was the arrival of massive, tall, wide, light colored antlers that got me. With a dandy set of impressive antlers towering over his distinctive, Roman nosed face, one hog of a mature buck strode up the creek embankment and waddled into view. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that Texas whitetails are small, for this old granddaddy of a buck was every bit as fat, muscular and heavy as a Kansas or Michigan brute up North. I could tell by the deep chest and brisket, and the fat belly that I had before me a 7+ year old trophy. Now the slight trembling began.

 

Slowly lifting my binocular, I examined this fine buck carefully and realized that I knew this old boy. I had encountered him in this same grove late last season. His distinctive white legs and exaggerated white facial markings clearly identified him as my old buddy. My bow was already at half mast, Scott release locked onto my bowstring, and my mind made up.

 

The does and fawns and younger bucks backed away as the old boy strode toward the small piles of Wildlife Innovations Buck bran I had put out as an attractant, and now my inner predator ballet was going into the gutpile pirouette hyper two step. I dance divinely.

 

A slight screen of leaves on a young cedar elm separated my arrow from his vitals, so I had no clear shot. It doesn’t take much interference to deflect a speeding arrow, so I held tight. As goes bowhunting, the big boy kept his forward shoulder toward my position for a long while, and life around me ceased to exist. It was just his ribcage and my broadhead that existed, nothing else.

 

With a graceful swing of his long neck and head, he took a step to his right, bringing his bulky chest clear of any obstruction, and the mushy 55# CP Oneida bow flexed back smoothly on its own. I zeroed in dead on the crease behind his left foreleg, and the next thing I knew, big white feathers were dangling out of his armpit as he and all the other deer exploded at once. Angling forward as he had turned, the zebra colored GoldTip shaft had surely sliced through his ribs and into the life pumping heart of the old beast, his sagging hindquarters telling of his imminent demise. Big Jim swung the SpiritWild vidcam from the now departed buck’s vaportrail, onto my now smiling, giddy face for the whole word to share, and I was one happy American bowhunter to say the least.

 

We captured on tape all the glory and joy of this wonderful, perfect hunting connection, then filmed the short, quick bloodtrail and recovery to the heartshot monster. Everytime we collect these wildlife gifts, a Nuge party erupts in the forests and wildgrounds of the world, knowing and celebrating the thrills of being so intimately functional as a beneficial, positive participant in this natural tooth, fang and claw world. Every exacting nuance and detail of the pre-event, anticipation, encounter, shot preparation and intense action is relived and articulated as clearly as possible, so that the viewer of our Spirit of the Wild TV shows and videos better understands the depth of spirit, form and function of the real world that we are living and documenting. Life and death is it. It is perfect. Shame on those who pretend otherwise. Rejoice to be a player.

 

For the Best of Spirit of The Wild DVDs or Ted Nugent Hunt Music CDs, contact tednugent.com or call 800-343-4868. Dealer inquiries welcome.

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Published by huntermt on 30 Jan 2012

reality hunting

I have been waiting for a reality based hunting show to come out on on of the networks for a long time, I want something I can be involved in and go online and vote for hunts I liked and recommend thing I want to see. I recently stumbled upon Outlanders on the Outdoor channel and although the hunt I watched didn’t appeal to me, the idea behind the newish series is what I wanted. They take everyday hunters and build an eposide around their choice hunt. In the hunters everyday honey hole. Next season you can enter in a drawing to have this be you, they opened up like 10 spots. I love this! I cant wait to see me and my buddies on tv.

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Published by archerchick on 11 Dec 2011

The Top 10 Trophy Whitetail States – By David Freed


Archery World September 1984
The Top 10 Trophy Whitetail States
By David Freed

ave you ever wondered which state
H harbors the most trophy whitetail
bucks? Your days of wondering may
be over, if trophy distribution statistics of
Pope and Young whitetail entries can be considered
an accurate indication of where those
big bucks can be found and are being taken.
It may not be a shock to you that the top 10
states for trophy whitetail bucks (with typical

antlers) are all located in the Upper Midwest.
The states among the top 10 go no farther east
than Ohio, no farther west than Nebraska or
South Dakota, and no farther south than Kansas.
The state farthest north is Minnesota.
And Minnesota just happens to be the top
state overall.
According to the statistics, which include
animals taken up to the 13th recording period

that ended in 1982, Minnesota has had 210
whitetail deer that have exceeded the minimum
score of 125 in the typical category.
Minnesota’s top entry scored 181-6/8. far
short of the 204-4/8 all-time record that M J`
Johnson took in Peoria County, Illinois. in
1965. Minnesota’s top entry ranks just eighth
on the all·time list, but more than half of Minnesota
deer on the Pope & Young record
books exceed the 140 mark.

The states that round out the top 10 for
total number of typical whitetail entries with
Pope & Young are: Wisconsin 177, Iowa 173,
Illinois 147, Kansas 124, Ohio 119, Indiana
94, South Dakota 83, Michigan 71, Nebraska
50.

Altogether, the top 10 states account for
1,248 of the 1,627 typical whitetail deer that
were entered with Pope & Young through
1982. It means that a whopping 77 percent of
Pope and Young typical trophy whitetails have
been taken in those 10 states alone.

And if you turn to trophy Whitetail deer
with non-typical antlers, you get close to the
same results, Minnesota again is the leader,

with 34 entries above the 150 minimum mark.
Iowa pulls in second with 18, Illinois is third
with 13, Kansas, Wisconsin, and Ohio tie for

T
fourth with nine, Nebraska is seventh with
seven, and South Dakota,Montana, and
Michigan tie for eighth with five. The only
difference between the typical top 10 and he
non—typical top 10 states is Montana is
included in the non-typical category instead of
Indiana. (And Indiana ties for 11th place with
Kentucky with four. Montana. by the way,
does rank 11th among states for typical
entries.)

So we’ve pointed out the top 10 states as
far as sheer number of whitetail deer entered
with Pope & Young. Minnesota. for now, is in
the lead. But where have the top 10 all time
deer been taken?

As stated before, M.J. Johnson leads the
typical antler whitetail pack with a 204-4/8
entry that he shot in Peoria County in 1965
Two of the top 10 all—time official entries are
from Illinois.

Meanwhile, Iowa has three entries in the
top 10 — the second and third place entries
and the fifth place entry. Right there are three
typical whitetails that reach above the 190
mark.

Nebraska has two in the top 10 (Sixth and
ninth) and Colorado (fourth). Kansas (seventh),
sigh ». and Minnesota (eighth) each have one.
See the accompanying chart for localities,
renters, and dates.)
As far as the non-typical whitetail all-time
top 10 list, Del Austin holds the record with a
279-7/8 deer he shot in Nebraska’s Hall
county in 1962. It is Nebraska’s only top 10
entry. Illinois leads all states with three top 10
enties (third, fifth, and eighth).
Iowa has two in the top 10 (seventh and
ninth, while Kansas (second), Wisconsin
(fourth), and Minnesota (10th) each have one.
So what do all these statistics prove?
It definitely proves Minnesota has had the

most trophy whitetail deer make the Pope &
Young record books.
And it definitely proves the Upper Mid-
west is a hotspot for bowhunting whitetail
deer. The statistics bear out the fact that the
most Pope & Young entries are from states in
the Midwest.

But it cannot be considered a totally accu-
rate way to judge where the most trophy
whietails are or where they’ve been taken.
“Mlinnesota is one of the best states, but
there are may be areas as good or better than
Minnesota,” says David H. Boland, Pope &
Young member who has been figuring out trophy
distribution statistics since 1978. “The
interest in entering with Pope & Young may
not be as high. Not all archers enter deer —
due to the lack of measurers, economics, or
lack of interest or time .”

It does cost $25 to get an entry made with
Pope & Young and there is a process to go
through and though there are more than 500
official Pope & Young measurers in North
America, they are not always conveniently located

“In Minnesota there are a fair amount of
measurers who are quite interested and want
to get animals entered.” Boland said. “It
proves you have to have the interest .” Boland,
by the way, lives in Minnesota.
Boland estimates that only 1/3 of record
book heads are measured. And without a
higher percentage of heads entered, “you
don’t have a totally accurate representation of
where the trophies are,” Boland says.
And, in Minnesota, about all a bowhunter
can go after are whitetail deer and black bear.
“‘The amount of people who hunt deer figures
in ,” Boland says. “The more hunters, the
more entries .”

A combination of factors are necessary for
a deer to be trophy size and Minnesota, along
with all the other Upper Midwest states, has
that combination.
“You have to have heredity,” Boland says.
“The father and mother have to have characteristics
that provide for offspring to be trophy
size.”

Good feed is also necessary, Boland says.
And deer simply need X amount of years
to grow racks to trophy size, which means
they must be able to survive hunters, weather,
and food shortages.

Archived By
www.Archerytalk.com
All Rights Reserved

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Published by archerchick on 11 Dec 2011

Bowhunting The Sitka Blacktail – By Marv Walter


Archery World September 1984

Bowhunting the Sitka Blacktail – By Marv Walter

“The Sitka Blacktail Deer is native to the
wet, coastal rain forests of southeast Alaska
and north-coastal British Columbia. The
Sitka blacktail is smallet stockier; and has
a shorter face than other members of the
blacktail group. The average October live
weight for adults is about 100pounds for
does and 150 pounds for bucks. The largest
dressed weight on record for a buck is 212
pounds.”

Hunting the Sitka Blacktail with a deer
call one year ago produced long-lasting memories.
As my partners —
Chuck Hakari and Terry Moore -— and I traveled southwest of Juneau across Stephens Pas-
sage in my 2l—foot Reinell enroute to starting
another hunt, we recalled last year’s blacktail
hunt on the Glass Peninsula on Admiralty lsland.
My unwanted encounter with an Alaskan
Brown Bear was unfaded in my mind.
While carrying my bow-killed blacktail to
the beach, I came upon a huge hemlock tree
which jutted at a 45 degree angle. I straddled
the tree, reclined, and balanced the heavy
load against it to relieve some strain. I had
packed the meat in a plastic bag in my pack
alongside my shotgun and survival gear I
blew my deer call a couple of times to see if
any deer would surface. I had my bow stowed,
not at all ready for action. Good deer sign
covered the area, but with the days success
and my fatigue, I hardly felt like stalking another animal.

There I rested, content, playing with the
call, when suddenly a full-sized Alaska Brown
Bear came loping out of some low spruces and
river drainage just 70 yards away. I froze,
watching him until he turned in my direction.
Instantly I dropped my bow, rolling of the
tree, lowering my pack. I knew I had to get the
shotgun; the bow would never do. I quickly
glanced up twice as the bear closed the distance.

I cursed as I fumbled with the pack straps.
The bear stopped on the other side of the down
hemlock. I raised my hands and yelled as loud
as I could. The bear rose up on two legs, moving
back a step, then dropped down, and rapidly
retreated 25 yards or so. There he
stopped, swayed his head from side to side,
turned, and came at me with a roar At a tree
he again rose to hind legs now only 15 yards
away I could hear him claw the bark, trying
fora look, and showing his full size. Moss and
wood chips flew as he scraped on the hem-
lock.

After only seconds, which seemed like
minutes, I had the shotgun in hand. He
dropped to the ground, coming right at me,
his dark, grizzled fur bristling with terrible
beauty I raised the shotgun and fired. In the
excitement I failed to lock into place and
brace the metal stock and the shotgun recoil
hit me in the face. I must have hit the bear in
the front chest area, but the buff of the shot-
gun bloodied my cheek and numbed my jaw so
I couldn’t be sure. The bear stormed away
instantly, parting brush as he went.

As I organized my thoughts, I hoped to see
the bear lying dead in the brush, but there was
no sign. I put on my pack and headed out of
the area, constantly in fear of his return.
I reached the rendezvous as Chuck arrived
with a good sized deer Tracy walked up a few
minutes later, My bear story got their attention
and, though leery 0f searching for a
wounded bear, we decided to look around.

The brownie had destroyed a rotten log and
torn up quite a bit of muskeg. Trampled brush
and deep tracks in the moss continued for 100
yards.

Flecks of fat hung from a branch; blood
spattered an area where the bear had laid
down. we searched for the animal for some
time, but lost the trail in the heavy brush.
We felt this trip would be equally challenging
and it proved to be just that.
With the double anchor in place, we went
ashore in an 8-foot skiff. It was 8 a.m. and,
with packs ready, we headed for the area on
Admiralty Island we figured would produce
the big bucks. Taking turns breaking trail, we
covered a distance of five miles over shin-
tangle and blueberry bushes, reaching our
base camp about noon.

Not wasting any time, Tracy headed for
the top ofthe mountain in search of a blacktail
buck.

Tracy is a rifle hunter, and carried a 30-06 A
with a 2.5×8 power scope. He also carried a
day pack with rain gear, wool clothing, a compass,
matches, knife, flashlight, first aid kit,
leather gloves (for the devil’s club), extra
food, and of course the deer call.
Hunting Sitka blacktail deer in southeast
Alaska has several options available depending
on the unit or area you hunt. The unit
which has the longest season is Unit 4, which
includes Admiralty Island, Chichagof Island,
Kruzof Island, Catherine Island and Baranof
Island.

The season is open from August 1 thru December 31
with five deer tags available; how-
ever, antlerless deer may be taken only from
September 15 to December 31. A portion of
Unit 4 is open January 1 to January 31 for
registration permit hunting only. Two deer
may be taken during this time but only one
deer may be in possession.

(Hunting Sitka blacktail deer in southeast
Alaska gets easier as the snow covers the up-
per meadows. The deer move toward the
lower bowls where the big spruce trees are.)
The non-resident fees are $l95. which include
the license ($60) and a big game locking
tag. A nonresident may purchase their hunting
license after arriving in Alaska. There is
no quota which restricts the number of non-
resident licenses available as is the case with
some states.

The Sitka blacktail has a separate Pope &
Young record book category which provides a
real opportunity for the bowhunter who wants
to concentrate on the larger bucks for the record book.

Chuck and I put the finishing touches to
base camp before we climbed the mountain.
Chuck climbed the same area as Tracy Chuck
was carrying his 80-pound recurve bow. a .44
caliber Winchester for bear protection, and
his day pack.

It is logical and, in my opinion. necessary
to carry a firearm for bear protection — especially
when hunting on Admiralty Island.
Brown bears (Ursus Arctos) are very
much a part of the Alaskan scene. Until recently,
taxonomists listed brown bears and
grizzly bears as separate species. Observation
of successful interbreeding between them indicated
a single species and a study of skull
characteristics substantiated this hypothesis.
All brown and grizzly bears are now classified
as Ursus Arctos. In popular usage, brown
bear refers to members of this species found
in coastal areas, while those found inland are
commonly called grizzlies.

I carried a Bear Alaskan 69-pound com-
pound and an 870 pump shotgun with the
short barrel and pistol grip for bear protection.
I use 2219 Easton GameGetter arrows
and Snuffer broadheads.

I used my homemade blacktail deer calls
several times on the bottom muskeg meadows
with no success. Upon reaching the alpine
level with south exposure, I called a nice doe
within 15 yards. I’d guess the doe had never
seen man before since she watched me for
several minutes. I was determined to take only
a nice buck on this trip, so I passed up an easy
shot. The doe hardly reacted at all to the five
rifle shots coming from the direction of Tracy
but did walk off in the direction of the shots.

The Alpine meadows contained many
fresh deer tracks and some bear sign. While
moving through the alpine cover, I encountered
several blue grouse. (In Alaska the blue
grouse or “hooter” is restricted to the south
eastern part of the state, appearing from Glacier
Bay southward. Dense, coastal forests of
tall Sitka spruce and hemlock are the usual
haunts of this grouse, but it’s often found near
timberline among dwarfed alpine firs. The
blue grouse is the largest upland game bird in
Alaska with the males sometimes in
weight of 3 1/2 pounds.)
Tracy entered base camp about half an
hour after I did for the evening. He was recovering
from the excitement of his encounter
with an Alaskan brown bear, I listened intently
as he described how he was covering the
upper alpine meadows when he encountered a
brown bear traveling the same trail. A brown
bear at 10 yards and still closing can create a
very rapid reaction. Tracy retreated rapidly
while preparing for a shot. The brown bear
continued his advance. The first shot was well
placed, but did not bring him down; four
additional shots were needed before Tracy felt
his safety was satisfied. Chuck, hearing the
shots and being in the area, helped Tracy with
the process of skinning the bear. It took most
of the sunny afternoon. Tracy left the hide on
top and returned to camp.

His opportunity to shoot a big buck was
now spoiled, because he could not carry out
both the heavy brown bear hide and a nice
blacktail buck. Tracy planned on return to
the top of the mountain the next day for the
meat and hide with his freighter pack. Scoring
on an Alaskan brown bear was worth the
disappointment. Chuck decided to continue
hunting for blacktail before returning to
camp.

Tracy indicated he had seen a tremendous
buck on top about 250 yards away. He didn’t
have a chance for a shot, but was stalking him
when he encountered the bear. About half an
hour before dark I left camp in hopes of calling
in a buck on the muskeg meadows near
camp. I returned at dark after having two does
come within 25 yards at the same time from
different directions. While waiting for Chuck
to return, Tracy and I wondered how this area
would be in late October or November when
the bucks are rutting and snow has driven the
deer to the lower muskeg meadows.

It was now dark and our conversation was
interrupted by a call from Chuck. We quickly
returned his call, which was for help in locating
our base camp. Chuck entered camp carrying the
hindquarters, boned meat from the
rest of the deer, and the antlers of the biggest
Sitka blacktail buck I’ve seen. Chuck wasn’t
given much time before telling us of his after-
noon hunt.

Chuck had left Tracy at 4 p.m. He was
descending the mountain and noticed the
body of a very large blacktail just 30 yards
away. The huge rack of the deer was not noticed
until he looked around a tree blocking
his view. The same tree also allowed him to
nock an arrow, draw, and place the arrow just

behind the front shoulders. The buck traveled
40 yards, then slid down the mountain. He
was still in view as he came to rest. It was 5
p.m. when Chuck started taking pictures,
skinned, and boned the meat. Chuck’s buck
made the Pope & Young record book. scoring
85.

Tracy and I returned to the top of the
mountain the next morning to get his hide and
hoped to call a buck within bow range. After
climbing for an hour, we reached the location
of the bear kill. The area was beautiful and
showed much sign of game activity. We prepared
the freight pack with the bear hide if
the trip down the mountain.

Separating from Tracy, I traveled less than
100 yards when I noticed five Sitka blacktail
deer coming my way. I quickly moved to an
ambush area and nocked an arrow. The buck
was in perfect position as the deer passed by
me. His head was behind a bush, fully aware.
but his body was fully exposed. I placed an
arrow perfectly behind the front shoulders
As the arrow passed through the deer, I could
hear the sound of air being released from the
lung cavity. The buck traveled just 40 yards
The remaining four does stayed in the area
and watched for another five minutes. I yelled
for Tracy to return. It took us only an hour it
skin and bone the 2×2 point buck for the return
trip. Together we descended the mountain, both
packs being heavy with game. We
shared our excitement as we broke camp for
the return trip to the boat.

Pleasure sets in when you experience an
overnight pack trip after blacktail deer.
I recommend hunting southeast Alaska for the
Sitka blacktail deer with a bow. But always be
prepared because of the constant danger due
to accidents, the challenge of nature, and the
presence of the brown bear. >>—>

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Published by archerchick on 11 Dec 2011

Big Deer In The Dust Bowl – By Wayne Van Zwoll


Archery World September 1984
Big Deer In The Dust Bowl – By Wayne Van Zwoll

The Rules On Big Bucks

Dust bowl. Wheat. Prairie. Such are
the things we think of when someone
mentions Kansas. If you’re up on your
history, you might also remember the Dalton
Gang and Carrie Nation. But what isn’t so
obvious about Kansas are the spectacular
bowhunting opportunities it offers today.
Dennis Rule knows about those opportunities.
His home state tendered him a whitetail
buck in 1982 that scored an even 202 Pope
and Young, making it the second largest ever
taken in Kansas — and number 15 on the alltime
non-typical Pope and Young list. It happened like this:

Rule, a 31-year-old Wichita resident, was
hunting in Clark County, in the western part
of the state. He and his brother Bill are seasoned
bowmen and had scouted their territory
well, putting up portable tree stands as early
as August. Some of the stands had proven
more productive than others, of course, and
by rut the brothers knew where to spend their
time.

November 13 was a cold, windy day, especially
in a tree stand. But Rule is a persistent
archer and believes that time in the woods is
often all that separates successful from unsuccessful
whitetail hunters. He shivered and
waited.

By 4 p.m. he had passed up numerous
does and four mature bucks, including one he
thought would have scored 150, well over the
P&Y minimum of 125. “It was a big, even
eight-point,” he reminisced later. “But the
wind was strong, and I didn’t think I could
make a clean shot. Besides, the rut was just
reaching a crescendo and I didn’t want to set-
tle for a mediocre buck yet.” Mediocre, in-
deed! But this is Kansas.

At about 4:30 a movement in the surrounding
thicket resolved itself into a deer
a big one, “This buck’s rack was enormous; I
could see that right away,” Dennis remembers.
“Wind or no wind, I had to take a shot at
him .”

Slowly the archer drew and anchored.
When the buck stopped, he released the string
on his 55—pound PSE Laser and drove a four-
blade Rocky Mountain Razor toward his tar-
get.

The wind tugged at the arrow and the
broadhead entered too far back. The buck
wheeled and bolted, then halted in a tangle of
brush. Rule could barely perceive the outline
of his quarry, but he saw the animal reach
around and bite off the shaft.
Within minutes the deer joined a group of
lesser whitetails feeding in a green wheat field
just outside the perimeter of the thicket, but
before long the big buck left them and headed
across the field toward some heavy brush.

“I was really afraid I’d lose him if he made
the trees,” Rule recalls. But he needn’t have
worried. The broadhead had nicked the
buck’s femoral artery and the animal collapsed short of the timber.

“I didn’t see him go down, so after gingerly
trailing him for a few yards across the
field I decided it would be best to finish the
job in the morning.” Like all savvy bowhunters,
Rule is almost paranoid about pushing an
animal that has sustained a hit. “When in
doubt, it’s always better to leave the trail and
come back to it later,” he says.

The next morning Rule trailed his buck to
where it had fallen and claimed the huge 17-
point rack. “It was a dream come true. I knew
there were bucks like that in the area, but I
have a great deal of respect for such monsters
and wondered if I’d ever get the chance to
arrow one .”

Dennis’ hunt was over, but brother Bill
still had a tag to notch. He wasted little time.
While his brother was hauling his trophy from
the field, Bill downed a fine typical whitetail
that also made Pope and Young. He would repeat
the performance a year later — in 1983
— with an even bigger buck!

Are the Rules hunting on a private deer
preserve? What is responsible for their success?
I was curious. So I asked Dennis. His
answers are valuable, not only for Kansas
bowmen, but for others hunting the agricultural Midwest.

First, Dennis, like many ambitious
archers today, is finding big bucks in places
that weren’t given much consideration just a
few years ago. The entire state of Kansas
might fall into that category! It wasn’t until
recently that the Sunflower State even had a
firearms deer season, and now more rifle permits
are being issued each year. Bowhunters
have an advantage here. in that there is no tag
quota for archery permits. Still. no over-
counter sales of any big game tags are allowed
in the state; even bow licenses must be purchased
(before October ll at regional fish and
game offices or at the headquarters (Rt. 2,
Box 54 A, Pratt, KS 67124). The 1983 bow
season ran from October l through November
30, and December 12 through 31. Dates for
1984 are similar.

Kansas’ deer population is on the up-
swing. Biologists estimate there are approximately
15,000 mule deer in the state now, and
80,000 whitetails. Like deer in other farmed
areas, Kansas bucks grow fast and big. It is
not unusual for a yearling to sport an eight-
point rack. Really massive antlers are more in
evidence at locker plants each season. It’s not
surprising that Fish and Game Commission
big game specialists expect the state whitetail
record to be broken any day.

“We’re always looking for new areas to
hunt,” Dennis explains. “The first year in
new territory is always a little tough. because
you are unable to draw on past knowledge of
buck movements there during the rut. Sure,
we do a lot of preseason scouting, but scouting
in summer and early autumn isn’t nearly
as beneficial as being in the woods when the
deer are rutting.”

Dennis and his brother build some of their
tree stands and use commercial ones as well.
“If we’re hunting a familiar area, we place
our stands where they’ve been effective before.
In new country, we locate them on the
main trails and near likely scrape pockets and
secondary trails. One of our most successful
ploys is to use a “bottleneck” in a shelter-belt
or creek bottom to funnel the deer to us. The
strips of timber bordering farmlands nearly
always have a narrow spot. Deer will stick to
the brush when moving during daylight
hours, and a stand at a bottleneck will give
you coverage of a large patch of cover.”

The Rules have been known to construct
their own bottlenecks — with spectacular
results. “Several years ago Bill had a tree
stand in a very good location and had spotted a
fine buck from it repeatedly during the season.
But the animal just wouldn’t come close
enough. Or the angle would be wrong. Or
brush would be in the way. So in mid-season
Bill constructed a brush barrier out of natural
materials he found near the stand. Normally
we don’t like to disturb a stand site once we’ve
started hunting from it, but Bill was desperate.
His efforts paid off. He arrowed that buck
the next time it came in. It was really a beautiful
animal – didn’t score well typically be-
cause of all the deductions, but a bragging-
size buck nonetheless.”

Bill and Dennis install their stands early —
usually in late August or the first week in September.
“But I like to save two or three for
emergency placement after the season
opens,” Dennis notes. “Especially if I’m
hunting a new area, the added flexibility pays
off. Sometimes buck movements during the
rut just can’t be predicted early. Extra stands
erected at last-minute notice near scrapes
have produced handsomely for us

The brothers like to hunt from tree stands.
Dennis maintains that in much of the Kansas
brush, still hunting trophy bucks is all but futile.
“I’m not saying it’s impossible to kill a
big buck that way, but it’s probably 10 times
as hard as from a tree stand ,” he asserts.

Proper camouflage is vital to success, according
to this bowman. “I wear camo clothing, of course.
And I mask my scent with a
commercial preparation that smells like prairie
vegetation. Skunk scent will also cover
your odor, but a skunk only sprays when it’s
alarmed. I think deer may be more alert when
walking into a scent pool left by a skunk then
when sniffing the odor of natural vegetation”

When not hunting, the Rules store their field
clothes in sacks, adding a bit of this scent before
sealing them. That way, their entire wardrobe
smells like prairie plants.
Though both men hunt most of the season,.
Dennis says he prefers the last week in October,
the first two in November. Why?
The bucks are a bit more predictable then.

They’re all fired up for the rut, of course. and
are beginning to make scrapes. But most of
the does haven’t come into estrus yet, and the bucks are
methodically making their rounds
in search of those that have.

Later, during the peak of the rut, bucks may be just
a little active, but they’re a whole lot less predictble.
A hot doe may draw a buck away from his
travel patterns; he may not behave at all like
you expect him to. He’s crazy.”

During the rut Bill and Dennis use scent
pads soaked in doe-in—heat scent to lure bucks
to their stands. “We hang the swatches on
bushes about 20 yards from the base of our
trees. I like to put my stand about 15 feet
up. This arrangement guarantees an easy shot
if the buck stops to sniff the scent pad.

Many hunters handicap themselves unnecessarily
by climbing too high or putting scent pads too
close to their trees. Either tactic makes for a
steep-angle shot and often a poor presentation.

Bill Rule frequently uses shed antlers to
rattle in his buck. Over the last three seasons
he has rattled in 12 trophy-class deer. “I rattle
for about 45 seconds, then wait 15 to 20 minutes
before repeating,” Bill explains. “If a
buck is going to come, he’ll generally show
up by the third rattle. Sometimes they come in
right away, throwing caution to the wind.

Bill’s 1982 buck was a huge 13—pointer
that scored 134 on the Pope and Young scale.
The buck came to his rattling at a dead run
and Bill arrowed the deer at 15 yards. “It was
an easy shot,” he recalls. “The four-blade
Rocky Mountain Razor from my 55-pound
Bear Kodiak went through both lungs. The
morning before I took this buck, I’d rattled in
two smaller, 10—point bucks and a nice six-
pointer.”

Bill maintains that, to be effective in rattling,
you must use large antlers and make the
clashing sound like two dominant bucks engaged
in serious battle. “Mature bucks that
may be listening just won’t pay attention to the
light ticking of little antlers,” he says. Bill of
ten uses small elk headgear to get the desired
effect. “Dennis has a dandy pair of shed
whitetail antlers at home that would be just
perfect for rattling,” he laughs. “But he
doesn’t have the heart to damage them!

The last buck Bill Rule brought home
dressed at 264 pounds and scored a whopping
159 typical points. It was shot at 14 yards. A
part-time taxidermist, Bill has been an avid
bowhunter for many years and has arrowed 47
big game animals, including 14 Kansas
whitetails.

What are the most important things to
keep in mind if you’re after a trophy Kansas
whitetail and or, for that matter, a big buck in
any agricultural area? The Rules offer this advice:
1. Be persistent. Don’t expect to connect
with a big deer the first time out, or the 10th.
Dennis spent over 150 hours in tree stands in
1983.
2. Do your homework. Not just before the
season, either. Start early. Know where
you’re going to hunt by mid-summer. Scout in
August, and have the majority of your tree
stands up by mid-autumn. Continue scouting.
Be observant.
3. Know your quarry. You cannot expect
to kill a big buck unless you’re intimately familiar
with the habits of whitetail deer and
with his habits specifically. Never underestimate
your quarry; his survival instincts are at
least as keen as you can imagine.
4. Be very, very careful going to and com-
ing from your stand. Do everything possible
to disassociate any human disturbance from
that area. Never get down from your stand
without first clearing the area of deer. If deer
are present when Dennis wants to leave, he
waits until they move away. Should a few individuals
choose to stay and loaf, he tosses
small objects into the brush until the animals
become nervous and leave. He doesn’t get
down until they’re all gone.
5. Stick to your standards. Trophy hunting is
not just shooting the biggest buck you
see. It’s setting a minimum acceptable standard
and passing up anything that doesn’t
measure up. You’ll never kill a big buck if you
insist on shooting little ones. The Rules will
occasionally take lesser animals late in the
season — “meat deer” — but never until the
rut is over and their chances for a trophy all
but gone.

Kansas deer are healthy, well-fed and plentyful.
Yes, Bill and Dennis hunt private land;
most of Kansas is privately owned. But their
hunting grounds — and areas just as productive
– are open to other bowmen who show
courtesy for landowners and respect for their
property – and who ask permission early in
the summer.

Yes, Bill and Dennis are experienced
archers. But they have no secret formula for
success. Hunting smart, spending time in the
woods, and paying attention to detail augment
the hard work we all know is a prerequisite for
putting big racks on the wall.

Do their tactics work for others? Well , last
year Dennis’ wife Janie arrowed a fine eight-
point whitetail. It was her second year of
hunting. Perhaps that says as much about deer
hunting in the dust bowl as any statistic. And
it certainly supports her husband’s contention
that big farm-country deer are available to
every enterprising archer!

>>>—>

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Published by archerchick on 10 Dec 2011

Here He Comes…There He Goes~ By Keith Schuyler


Archery World November 1976

Here He Comes..There He Goes.. – by Keith Schuyler

The Cottontail Challenge Gives you a low batting average, but nothing beats it for action

by Keith Schuyler

THERE WAS A TIME when I used to
get plenty of invitations to go rabbit
hunting. Not any more. Because I do
most of my rabbit hunting with the bow
and arrow.
“Most.” For if I want some rabbit to
eat, I grab the shotgun and go get some.
Well, usually. As a matter of fact, since I
do hunt with the bow, although I don’t
get many with the bow, I learn where
the rabbits hang out. About every other
year or so, if I get hungry for a good
mess of fried rabbit, I fill a couple
pockets with shells and go gun hunting.
Most of the ones I found with the bow
are still there.

Why don’t more so-called bowhunters
go for rabbits with the bow? Could it be
because one doesn’t get very many
rabbits that way? Could it be for the
same reason that, even where bowhunting
is permitted, so-called bowhunters
drop the bow and grab the rifle when
the deer gunning season comes in? I
don’t know.

You hear a lot of talk about a shortage
of rabbits in many areas. They’re not too
scarce where I hunt. Because I’m one of
the world’s greatest conservationists, my
wife says. But, then she spoils it by
adding, “He didn’t plan it that way.”
But rabbit hunting with the bow and
arrow can build up to some real thrills.
It’s sort of like when I go bowling, every
other year or so. When all the pins some-
times stumble over on my first ball, it is a
cause of real rejoicing. The fact that
they keep blasting down with fair regularity
on the lanes either side of mine
isn’t important. When it happens to me
twice and even three times, well . . .l

Would you believe it? One time, a
number of years ago, I took my full day’s
limit of four rabbits with the bowl I’ve
done that quite a number of times with
the gun, and it never excited me too
much. But I did it with the bow, once.
And that was a mighty big day.
There was another big day in my
hunting life. That was the time I nailed
my first cottontail on the run with an
arrow. We even taped the distance:
eighty—three feet! Running full tilt over
the snow; right through the heart. Like
my wife says, “He didn’t plan it that
way.” But that old bunny flipped and
never moved a muscle. I was still so
excited some years later that I dedicated
my first book on archery to that rabbit.
(Archery, From Colds to Big Game) It
was one of the greatest thrills I have ever
had in hunting, and that covers some.
Since then I’ve shot two more rabbits
at full gallop. Three rabbits shot
running for many years of hunting them
with the bow doesn’t sound like much—
until you try it. I may never get another,
but of one thing you can be sure: I’ll
keep trying as long as I can.

Now don’t get me too far wrong. I’ve
taken a great many rabbits with the
bow. But most of them were sitting in
their resting places for the day or were
out hopping around in early morning or
late afternoon.

In Pennsylvania, we say that a sitting
rabbit is in its nest. This is not really
correct since the true nest of a rabbit,
where it drops its young, wouldn’t hold
one adult rabbit.
It is an unwritten rule of sportsmanship
in our area that one doesn’t shoot a
rabbit in the nest with a shotgun.
Because the cottontail will sit tight,
thinking it is safe, and it is actually
sometimes possible to grab one with the
hand. However, when hunting with the
bow, such a shot is considered sporting
for a number of reasons.

First, because the chance of dropping
a rabbit on the run with an arrow is so
slight, it is a rare occasion when anyone
scores. This doesn’t discourage shooting
at them when they take off, because it is
possible to drop one on the move.

Secondly, a rabbit is a small target to
start with, and the positive killing area is
even smaller. It takes close shooting. just
finding one is sport in itself.

Strangely enough, the fact that some
shots are presented quite close is actually
a handicap. Few archers practice very
much at the very short distances; they
can usually hit easier at ten yards than at
ten feet. Cottontails will sometimes sit so
tightly that you bumble upon them
within inches of your boots. Trying to
get an arrow off without taking a toe
along with it can challenge your dexterity
more than your shooting ability
under such circumstances.

I suppose I must confess to a certain
amount of luck on my few successful
running shots. One of them was first
missed at a distance of perhaps two feet.
The cottontail, a big one, was first
spotted about eighteen inches from my
right foot. Being right-handed, it required
some real body contortions to
half draw and try to aim down the shaft.
All the arrow brought was a couple
hairs, but it was that close. The cottontail
took off. A few moments later
another rabbit about the same size went
scooting off to my left and to the rear. I
cut loose an arrow and surprised both of
us by connecting. This was a ninety-degree shot,
probably the toughest
successful one ever for me.
Right after dumping my first running
rabbit. I missed one at about ten feet
sitting quietly and minding its own
business!
Since I rank somewhere above the
bottom among the world’s better bow-
hunters, those who claim frequent
success on running rabbits are truly great
shots, or they are truly great liars.
Western cottontails do more hopping
around than our eastern variety. With
all that big country to run in, they seem
more disposed to just move to the next
clump of sage or hide behind a rock

where rocks are available. Although the
eastern animals depend upon camouflage
to protect them as much as possible,
when they take off, they go! Usually it is
to the nearest woodchuck hole or a briar
patch so thick that a worm couldn’t
crawl through unscathed without wearing chaps.
This is usually more likely on
a day of bad weather or when bad
weather threatens.

However, on a reasonably clear day,
alarmed cottontails in my neck of the
woods will simply run to a position of
reasonable safety and wait for hunters to
move on. This is where a good little
beagle comes in handy. I suggest little
since the bigger ones move the rabbits
too fast for those like me of limited
ability with the bow. Further, if a rabbit
is pushed too fast by the dog, it will hole.
If the dog only keeps the cottontail loose,
it is more apt to just hop far enough
ahead of the beagle to feel fairly safe.
By stationing yourself at a probable
crossing, you have a good chance to get
a hopping shot. Or you might get a stationary
target. When cottontails aren’t
being pushed too hard, they will frequently
stop at an opening before again
taking to the brush. They will usually
circle back to the immediate area from
which they were bounced. And on the
way they will often follow old roads and
well-worn game trails. They will stop
from time to time to locate the pursuing
dog by sound.

Take plenty of arrows when you go
hunting for rabbits. Because, if you play
it right, you often will get several shots
at the same rabbit. Lost arrows are frequent.
Knowing how arrows can hide
themselves in a freshly mowed lawn
should be a clue as to what you might
expect under field conditions.

That brings us to what equipment is
best for rabbits. The best bow is the one
with which you can hit something at distances
from roughly five to 50 feet. Of
course, the heaviest bow you can handle
well is the best for any kind of hunting,
and hunting rabbits is no exception. A
light target bow of thirty pounds will do
fine on sitting shots, but it isn’t adequate
for the longer or the running shots. You
have to make too many mental calculations
at unknown distances for the
tougher tries. Sometimes, if I just go out
for an early morning try for deer when ~
rabbits are in season, I may stop off for a
try at cottontails on the way home. The
only thing I change is my arrows.

Aside from the fact that aluminum,
broadhead—loaded shafts are too expensive
to fling around the south forty, they
aren’t necessary. A properly spined
wooden arrow will do a good job. And,
you don’t want broadheads.

It might seem strange to discourage
the use of broadheads that will bring
down an elephant as inadequate for
rabbits. But, they don’t work well. The
reason is not their lack of killing power;
it is their lack of holding power. A
proper broadhead will zip through an
animal as small as a rabbit and go
careening off into the brush or across the
field. The rabbit will continue on as
though nothing happened until it finds
its favorite groundhog hole. If it makes
it.

Whether it makes it or not, it is a dead
rabbit after being thrust through by a
broadhead-loaded shaft. And, although
the rabbit is not generally credited with
special tenacity to life, it is still a wild
creature with the normal complement of
adrenalin which will carry it far beyond
what might be expected.

The best load for cottontails, in my
experience, is a good wooden shaft
tipped with the normal field point. The
combination is economical enough for
the average bowhunter. And, it will do a
proper job. On a stationary target, it
will pin the animal so that it can be re-
covered. On a moving shot, the shaft
will almost always stay in the rabbit to
make recovery possible before it escapes
and becomes a wasted creature.
True, the broadhead may be a bit
more efficient as a dispatcher, but the
field point will normally do a proper job
and also retain the carcass for the table.
Blunts will kill, but they lack the penetrating
power to bury the shaft in the
earth so that the rabbit cannot escape.

In the many years that I have hunted
rabbits with the bow and arrow, I have
had but two losses. One was a forty-yard
shot some years ago that quickly turned
elation into disenchantment when the
cottontail made it to a woodchuck hole
with the arrow. Last year I had my
second loss when a high hit failed to hold
the rabbit.
These experiences taught me two
things to improve my approach to rabbit
hunting with the bow. Long shots may
stimulate one’s ego if they are succesful,
but the flat angle of the arrow
reduces the likelihood that the animal
will be pinned for easy recovery. Shooting
at a rabbit without knowing exactly
how it is sitting in its nest may produce a
hit that will not be sufficient to hold the
animal for immediate recovery.

As in big—game hunting, there is an
individual responsibility to exert every
effort to recover game that is hit. Any
good hit is likely to cause almost immediate
death. But it only takes seconds for
a rabbit to waste itself by running to
cover in a briar patch or a woodchuck
hole. Nevertheless, the sportsman will
follow up on suspected or observed hits
to recover the quarry.
Hunting of any small game with the
bow and arrow offers a challenge that
lifts one’s sights above the need or desire
for meat, a fair return on the consider-
able investment that is entailed in any
type of hunting. But when we venture
afield with a primitive arm to collect a
quarry made available to us, we accept
a new responsibility to give it the best we
can offer.

If hunting rabbits with the bow
appeals to you, you might try the approach
suggested here. You may find
that there are some big thrills available
in hunting this small game.

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Published by archerchick on 09 Dec 2011

The 10% Club – By Tim Burres


Bowhunting World Xtreme 2004
The 10% Club – By Tim Burres

Only 10% of the bowhunters consistently bring home the trophies. Here’s what you can do to join this elite club.

If you don’t belong, you won’t find a bouncer to
turn you away at the door of the 10% Club. There’s no
specific meeting place. But, you will know when
you’ve met one of the card carrying members. He will
be the guy with the trophy room full of big deer. To
join the club, you don’t have to be famous and you
d0n’t have be the founder of an oil empire. You don’t
even have to be a particularly winsome fellow-
which makes membership a possibility for everyone.
You pay your membership dues over a period of
years with countless weeks spent in treestands.

Members of the 10% Club may seem like geniuses when you
dissect some of their hunting strategies, but Mensa is
one club very few will ever make it into. They may not
scare Einstein in an IQ contest, but what these members
do have are open minds that permit them to view
every hunting situation as if it were a blank slate.

These 10% Club members enter every hunt without preconceived
notions of what is “supposed to happen” or some idea that
they must do things “the right way.” And they are meticulous
to the 9th degree in everything they do involving deer
hunting. Here’s what you can learn from the Board of Directors
at the 10% Club.

THINKING OUTSIDE
THE BOX

I ran across a perfect example of why some hunters are consistently successful while others are not. This example shows the
power of thinking outside the box and being aggressive when the situation calls for it.

Stan Potts has been a regular fixture around central Illinois’
Clinton Lake Wildlife Management Area for at least two decades.
Some years he has hunted on the limited draw public lands and other
years he has hunted private land in general area. During the early
‘90s a great 6×6 buck lived on the public management area. All the hunters knew about him and everyone wanted to get a crack at him

One day Stan was hunting a stand in a fence line along the edge of a picked cornfield when he saw the buck bedded with a doe in a thin patch of giant foxtail grass in the middle of the field. It was the peak of
the rut and Stan knew the buck was holed up out there with the doe. In fact, Stan even saw the buck breed the doe once during the morning session.

Rather than wait and hope the buck would eventually get up and come past,
Stan decided the best strategy was to take the hunt to the deer. There is never a better time to make your play for a big buck than when you know where he’s at.

They are so tough to even get a look at that when one is right there in front of you it’s important that you do everything possible to get the shot right then. Stan knows that from having hunted big bucks for all his adult life.

After a few quick plans were made Stan climbed down from the tree and
carefully began stalking the buck. Unbeknownst to him, a bowhunter from Oklahoma was watching the show from a stand on the other side of the field.

“Later the guy told me that when he saw me start the stalk he said to himself ‘Oh no, whats this moron doing?”’ said Potts. “The situation was right or I never would have tried the stalk. The wind was blowing hard and it was misting rain. The cornstalks were soaked and the ground
was soft so there was no way the deer would hear me. Also, the wind was perfectly in my favor so I could sneak in on the deer from behind.

If they had stood up at any time they could have seen me even if I was lying down. I moved along one row at a time. I’d rise up on my elbow, make sure they weren’t looking and then roll gently onto my back in the next corn row.

“The suspense was killing me as each row brought me another yard closer. Finally, I counted only 50 rows between the deer and myself but I didn’t have an opening to his chest. There was no way I could wait until they stood up or they’d see me instantly. I had to make the shot while he was still bedded. There was an opening in the grass a short ways to the side so I eased into position. From there I was only 25 yards from the buck.

I turned the bow sideways and drew it as I rose up slowly onto one
knee. He never knew I there. The shot was perfect and when they blew out I could see the nock of the arrow sticking out of his chest. I knew he wasn’t going far. The buck only ran about 50 yards before making a
button hook and going down.

“The excitement had been so intense that I could hard stand it When he went down I was in shock still standing there staring at the buck when the guy from Oklahoma runs right up from behind and yells at me he about scared me out of my skin. Then we celebrated together. He was a great guy and was just as excited as if he’d killed the buck himself. He told me how he had watched the whole stalk from the treeline. After things calmed down he told me that he had been watching the buck for two days. His ear-to-ear grin immediately disappeared when I casually asked him why he hadn’t tried the stalk himself. His eyes fell to the ground and he shook his head and said in a very soft voice ” I don’t know.”

Stan’s buck was a local legend with a massive rack having a gross score well over 170 inches and a net that came in just under 170. He got the buck because he was able to think creatively and adapt to the situation at hand. He didn’t get bogged down in what he was suppose to do, but rather focused on what he knew about mature buck behavior (they are very hard to see more than once) and what might work. Taking advantage of the situation permitted an effective stalk, he did something most bowhunters would be afraid to even try.

The ability to think creatively is one of the traits that set the members of the 10% Club apart from all the other deer hunters. Textbook strategies will sometimes work, but mature bucks are individuals. To tag them consistently you have to treat each one as if he were the only deer
on earth. It is unwise to assume anything about a particular buck beyond the fact that he is sure to be wary.

From bits and pieces of sign and sporadic sightings, you may be able to piece together enough information to learn the buck’s particular personality and within that you may be able to find some type of
behavior that makes him slightly vulnerable.

You won’t find much to work with, because these deer are not very visible and they are the most cautious creatures on earth.
Once you get to know a little bit about the buck you can determine such things as whether or not he’s aggressive (if he is, rattling might work). You might figure out where he most often beds and feeds you
might be able to find an ambush between these points) and whether or not he is an active participant in the rut (if he isn’t your only real hope is catching him at his bed or late in the season at a food source.

If you enter the hunt with a cast-in-stone idea of what mature bucks are
“supposed to do,” you will have a very hard time adapting to what the buck you are hunting actually is doing. The ability to keep an open mind in your approach to hunting specific bucks is one key that
opens the door to the 10% Club.

ATTENTION TO DETAILS

The second trait that club members share is an overpowering belief in the notion that if it can go wrong it will. Therefore, they are detail oriented people that aren’t willing to let even one small aspect of the
hunt that can be controlled slip through their grasp. For this reason they are extremely thorough in everything from shooting practice and equipment maintenance to scouting and stand placement.

Here are some of the details that 10% Club members wake up in the middle of the night fretting about that other deer hunters barely consider.
Entry and exit is the key: I remember a stand one of my buddies offered me while I was hunting with him a few years ago.

Even though we sat on the county road looking at the stand across a picked grain field, it still took him five minutes for him
to explain what I had to do to get to it without being detected. “Go behind that house and around the pig lot, get into the creek, grab the roots under the high bank and climb up, etc.” I knew instantly that
this was going to be a good stand. Anyone who understands the importance of the exit and entry routes this well is bound to
have great stand locations.

I can always tell a good hunter when listening to his explanation of a stand because he is obsessed with the perfect entry and
exit routes. Experienced hunters know that these routes are even more important than the sign the stand overlooks.

Average deer hunters can all tell you where to find buck sign. Members of the 10% Club have mental maps too, but they aren’t marked with buck sign and deer trails; they are marked with all the undetectable entry and exit routes that dissect their hunting areas.

Shooting lanes; Once you start to realize how hard it is get a giant buck within range of your stand you’ll do everything possible to capitalize on these infrequent encounters. In other words, you need to be
able to get a good shot at him. Members of the 1O% Club know all too well the importance of having shooting lanes in every direction. By this, I’m not talking about dropping napalm on the acre of cover surrounding your stand; all you need is a window — some kind of gap — that allows you to get a shot at anything that passes your stand in any direction and at any distance within your maximum range.

Before you relax after climbing into your stand, take the time for this exercise. If you will do it every day you will be rewarded during the moment of truth. Imagine a buck approaching from every possible direction. How will you handle each possibility and where will you shoot?
If you don’t have a good answer it’s time to get the saw out and create an answer.

Intelligent diligence; I recently returned from Alberta where l was hunting with an outfitter who is a new bowhunter. He is a great gun hunter but not a great bowhunter. I was pretty much on my own.
After we discussed bowhunting strategy for a week—and applied some of it in the form of stand sites-Ron made a very insightful comment to me. He said, “Successful bowhunting can be summed up as intelligent diligence.”

Ron had quickly figured out that you have to combine equal parts of
hard hunting with smart hunting. It was clear to me right then that Ron was on the fast track to getting his membership card.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS
FOR CLUB MEMBERSHIP

Keen instinct; Some guys will never meet the 10% Club’s minimum requirements for membership for “hunter’s instinct”. Quite frankly, they aren’t interested enough in the behavior patterns of mature bucks to learn everything they possibly can about them. Sure, they want to shoot one, but the animal doesn’t fascinate them to the extent necessary to stimulate their need to know more.

Highly successful buck hunters are more than just students of the latest biological research; they are on the cutting edge of research. They are always coming up with theories to explain some kind of behavior they see and then focus on trying to prove it or disprove it. The final goal, of course, is to find weaknesses they can exploit. I respect everything that
comes out of the mouths of the top biologists, but I put just as much stock in the words of proven buck hunters.

Making the shot: Not only are the members of the 10% Club hard and smart
hunters, they are good at converting opportunities into venison. Even the best hunters may only get a very limited number of close encounters during a season —sometimes none- so they take each one of them very seriously. They condition their minds so that they are prepared to convert on every decent chance that comes along. This is not a skill that
people are born with. It is something that is built through-you guessed it—attention to detail and lots of practice.

When a big buck causes your throat to tighten, the only thing that will pull you through is the many hours of disciplined practice that came before. Great habits during practice translate into great performance when the chips are down. If you are serious about getting into the Club,
realize that your ability to shoot well— without having to think about it- will someday be the only thing that stands between you and a wall full of trophies.

CONCLUSION

Membership in the 10% Club requires that you go beyond the simple preparations and actually do all the things that you know you should do. Most guys that have read magazines about deer hunting know what to do, they just don’t do it. Rising to the next level takes dedication, effort and time. But, if you love deer hunting, the quest will become its own reward.

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Published by archerchick on 09 Dec 2011

Killer Stalking Strategies- Jim Van Norman


BOWHUNTING WORLD Xtreme 2004
Killer Stalking Strategies – By Jim Van Norman

Scouting, Glassing, and Stalking are the crucial tactical triad for taking open-country mulies

When he tired of the hot sun. he would
look for a new spot. and as he was waiting.
Three·do:en minutes later a wide
set of antlers sauntered into view. A
few more steps and the deer would he
broadside at 32 yards. When the big
muley quartered and looked away. I sent
an arrow through his tilage. The
buck’s companion jumped to his feet
and stood in wonder, The fatally
arrowed buck leaned forward turned.
walked toward my position — and lay
down for the last time.

There are many elements to successfully taking mule deer with a how
and arrow. Three of those elements stand out: scouting, glassing, and stalking.

Stalking 101
With excellent stalking skills, your
scouting and glassing efforts go for “naught,”
so I’ll start with the basics of stalking.
Those who have stalked mule deer
know it is exciting. It can he frustrating
and disappointing at times, but gaining
stalking experience is important. Trial
and error is what ultimately cultivates
a stalking expert.

First, choose only stalking opportunities
with the highest chance of success, Rate each
as having an excellent, good, mediocre or poor chance. This is
crucial; many stalks are blown because
their possibilities were mediocre or poor
to start with. Don`t stalk unless you
have a good to excellent chance. trying
to turn a poor opportunity into something it’s not is a mistake, especially, it
it is a buck you can’t live without.
until he beds in a better spot.
Your evaluation needs to be in depth: “Can I get into position for a
responsible shot within my effective range? Can I draw without being seen
when he stands up? What is the terrain and footing likely to be once l get
critically close? Are there other deer presenting obstacles? If I have to wait for
the deer to stand and offer a shot, is the wind dependable?” Consider these
items carefully.

A variable wind ruins more stalks than any other detail. Ask yourself: “Is
the wind steady enough to trust? Can I approach with the wind directly in my
face or, at the very least, with a quartering or crosswind, Considering that
wind, where is my best stalking route,” Remember, terrain affects the wind
considerably. Surface interference —draws, trees, rock outcroppings, etc. —
makes the wind do funny things. Give me a stalk in a stiff wind anytime. You
can count on a stiff wind to stay steady and cover mistakes.

Second, map your stalk mentally. (I can’t emphasize this enough.) Plan
a route between you and the deer that contains three solid, easily recognizable
checkpoints. Avoid using objects that are excessively common and could
be confusing. If you fail to do this, you may well find yourself in the wrong
place as your buck bolts away. It is always surprising how different the
country looks between your glassing view and the view on the ground once
you start sneaking through it. Pick a dead tree, an unusually shaped stump
or snag, distinctively colored or shaped boulders, rock piles, or outcroppings
as checkpoints. Any feature with unique detail will work.

Checkpoint #1 should be something that confirms, after leaving your glassing site, that you have ended up in the right area to begin your stalk. Checkpoint #2 should be about halfway to
Checkpoint #3, a location where you can, without being seen, confirm
Checkpoint #3 and see if the deer is still there. Although the actual location
of the deer deserves a strong mental note, Checkpoint #3 should be where you wait for a shot to develop.
Don’t go in closer than 2O yards; allow a small buffer in case the deer comes
toward you. But don’t be farther than 30 yards; you want to allow some room
before the deer gets out of range if he walks away from your position.

Now, here are three of the most important facets to the stalk’s final
stages. First; when you check the deer’s position at Checkpoint #2, look for
antler tips, ears or another part of the deer. Don’t look at his eyes. If you can
see his eyes, he can see you. Second; “sneaking a peek” en»route to Check~
point #3 blows a lot of stalks. Don’t do it! If you know the deer’s location in
relation to Checkpoint #3, you don’t need to see him! Concentrate on foot
placement and staying out of sight. Don’t get busted two thirds of the way
through your stalk.

Third; Checkpoint #3 is where you let the deer make the fatal mistake.
Once you get there, check for an antler tip, put your bow up in front of you
(bow limb tip or cam on the ground, if you are on your knees) and nock an
arrow. Don’t let your upper bow limb stick up where the deer can see it. Stay
put until the deer gets up to move, no matter how long it takes! The only time
you want to force a deer to get up is if the wind becomes variable and there’s
a chance he’ll catch your scent. Then you have nothing to lose by throwing a
rock, or calling on a predator or deer call. Otherwise, hang tough. The deer
will make “the fatal move.”

Stalking takes practice. So take time while in the field to sneak up on some
does and small bucks for fun. You will learn more with each attempt.
Glass For “Pieces And Parts” Glassing, in my opinion, is a corner»
stone to being a top»notch mule deer hunter and is an HIC within itself. Mule
deer bucks select places to bed that are,
in most cases, well~hidden yet provide a panoramic view. A big buck’s general tendency is to “hole up” in a position where he can see a lot of country and sneak out far ahead of imminent danger.
If not well»hidden, the spot will instead take full advantage of the deer’s superior eyes, nose, ears and protective coloration. In any case, a mature mule deer buck’s bed is carefully chosen, strategically located and unlikely to offer a noise free, scent free or entirely invisible route. To have any chance at
approaching within range, you have to find him first.

When glassing for mule deer, don`t concern yourself with spotting the
whole deer at once. Learn to focus on mule deer “pieces and parts.”»(see 15
images above right) Train your mind to alert your eyes to look again when you
pick up one of these images in your binoculars or spotting scope. Burn these.
images into your mind until it become second nature for you to stop scanning
immediately and concentrate on the image. No matter whether you see them
with the naked eye or with optics, stay and pick it apart.

Since glassing is a major key to success, top notch optics are a must. This
rule is always buy optics one notch above what you can afford. You’ll never
be sorry. It’ll be worth it in the long run.
Scout Early And Be Stealthy, Scouting is another important part of
the success formula. Not only do you have to scout for deer, but the need to
find the right types of country to hunt is pivotal. Some country lends itself
better to stalking than other areas.

There is no sense in scouting a bunch of country if there are only a few places
where a stalk is even possible. Heavy brush, black timber or wide open rolling hills are harder to stalk. A
mule deer`s senses are so acute, successful stalking in heavy vegetation is
tough. sometimes impossible. The same goes for open, rolling hills. A stalk may
work in certain situations here, bur requires extreme patience and a flawless approach.
At best, both are low percentage endeavors.

Easier to stalk areas include canyons.
draws, cut-banks, washouts, etc. Notice
I said “easier,” not “easy.” Rough, cut up
and sparsely vegetated country presents more opportunities to approach unnoticed, Shade, the number one place to find mule deer bucks, is a limited commodity here. It is found only under cut~banks, washouts, overhangs and under the limited vegetation. That’s a good
thing.
Pick an area to scout that will present the highest percentage stalks.
Do most of your scouting at least a month ahead of the season. A big mistake
many hunters make when coming out West is showing up a few days early
and stirring up their chosen area. About the only thing they accomplish is chasing
a big one out of the country. If you absolutely cannot get to your hunting
area until a few days before the season, go before daylight to the highest hill in the
area where you can scope the country.

Big Mulies melt mysteriously into the landscape. To find them, train yourself to look for bits and pieces, rather than the whole deer. Can you find the two bucks in this photo?

Scout from that vantage point all day, each
day before the season opener. You will do far
less damage to your opening day hunting
than stomping out through the brush. In
fact, I’d be willing to bet you will see more
deer from your hidden vantage point!

When scouting, use all your hunting
tactics as if you were going to take a buck.
That is, when getting into position to glass,
sneak into position, The fewer deer you
spook, the better. If you are new to
bowhunting mule deer, as long as you are
scouting far ahead of the opener, spend
some time down in the deer’s living rooms.

Before you learn how mule deer operate you
will certainly spook quite a few. This is to
be expected, so don’t get discouraged.

As long as you are scouting a least a month before the season, the deer will
settle back into their normal routines. Spend considerable time inspecting the
places from where deer came busting out. Get an idea of what those bedding
sites look like and how they are situated in relation to the terrain. Note what
kind of cover is present and how the deer use the wind. As you leave the area.
glass back at those sites so you have an idea what they look like from a distance.
Although experience is the greatest teacher, mastering these three foundational elements will help provide many enjoyed successes in bowhunting mule deer. Remember your scouting, glassing, and stalking experiences by keeping a journal of facts and observations
for later reference. You’ll be surprised at
the patterns you begin to note and then
use to your advantage.
>>—>

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