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Archive for the 'Cooking Game' Category

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Published by XtremeSportsmanDecal on 26 Sep 2012

Squirrel Bowhunting Tips and Recipe

Squirrel Hunting with a Bow

I grew up eating squirrel.  My grandmother used to catch them with traps, and make delightful meals with squirrel meat.  I didn’t realize that most people don’t eat squirrel!  But anyway, now that I’m a bow hunter, sometimes I bring in a squirrel and replicate one of my grandmother’s recipes.

Bow hunting for squirrel is not the easiest thing in the world.  But if you know how to use a bow, you should be able to handle it.

Here are some quick tips for hunting squirrels with a bow:

  • Don’t use broadheads (especially the nice ones) – they’ll get ruined.
    • Instead, use small game points or Judo points
  • Don’t shoot squirrels in the trees – you may lose an arrow.
    • Use a tree stand and shoot down into the ground.

Squirrel Dip Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. cooked squirrel meat, finely chopped
  • 1 Cup Cream Cheese
  • 1 Cup Whole Milk
  • 2 TSP Half and Half
  • 1/2 Cup Sour Cream
  • Green Onions, finely chopped (Optional)
  • Diced Tomatoes (Optional)
  • Onion, Garlic, Salt to taste

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and blend until thick and creamy.

Season to taste.

Serve with pretzels, chips, crackers, or chunks of fresh bread.  Enjoy!

More Fun for Bow Hunters

Bow hunting for squirrels can be a lot of fun!  It’s very challenging.  Next time you’re out bow hunting for deer or other wild game, and a squirrel gets in your way, take a shot!  You may surprise yourself.

I especially enjoy bows, wild game recipes, and watching videos of squirrel hunting on YouTube.  Great fun!

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Published by Casey Stutzman on 11 Jun 2012

Where Does Your Meat Come From?

With the modern day ritual of “hunting camp” hunting does not always get associated with health and wellness. Perhaps it is because at camp there are usually more calories consumed in liquid form then sold, many items in the cupboard would survive a nuclear apocalypse and a pound of butter is the standard unit of measurement for most recipes. Hunting camp aside there is an amazing benefit modern hunting offers the hunter and his/her family when it comes to their wellbeing. I am referring to seeing your meat in the field before you see it on your plate.

 

I grew up in a suburb of Detroit and spent my whole life in metropolitan areas until I was almost 23 years old. If you were to ask me, “were does your beef come from” I would answer you “Meijer” and then look at you like you had a third eye growing out of your head. What I was really saying was I have no idea, where my meat comes from, what’s in it, what it as eaten, how it was raised and how long it has been since it met its demise. These are important things to know! We eat what our food eats, what is put into its body we put into ours. That can be a laundry list of things I would never consciously consume but do every day because I don’t know it’s there.

 

When I went out to my wife’s (future wife at the time) parent’s beef farm for the first time they sent me home with a Wal-Mart bag overflowing with fresh beef from a cow they had just sent to the butcher.  I was thrilled to get it home and slap it on the grill but when I opened it all I felt was disappointment.  The bright red hue that I had grown accustomed to seeing from my supermarket ground beef was not there so I assumed it was bad and called MB over to inform her that her folks were pedaling rancid meat. She then looked at me like I had a third eye and said, “that is the color it is supposed to be, haven’t you ever seen real beef before?” I guess I haven’t, but I instantly began to wonder what made the other meat so red and was it something that I wanted to ingest?

It was then I began realizing how much goes into our “fresh” food that really shouldn’t be there.  Luckily there are others who demand untainted sources of protein so markets like Whole Foods and other local grocery stores and butcher shops have made it easy for consumers to obtain organic and or grass fed animals that are not mass produced.  Like anything else if you want quality you are going to have to pay for it and these healthier options come with a steep price tag in comparison to their steroid pumping brethren.

That brings us full circle back to where the conversation began, hunting in all its forms provides us with an opportunity that is so rare in our modern world; to see it, shoot it, dress it, butcher it, prepare it and plate it.  One of the greatest meals of my life was eating back straps that had been walking in the field not 12 hours ago with my brother in law (who is an amazing trained chef; hence the positioning on the great meals list)

The secret to nutritional success is to take responsibility for it.  To not depend on others for your nutrition is the ONLY way for us to be at our best when it comes to fueling our bodies.  I have found no better way to take charge of the food my family eats than to get out in the woods and fill our freezer with the life giving sustenance of the land that has allowed mankind to not only survive but thrive throughout its history.

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Published by llpensinger on 12 Nov 2011

Eastern Shore Hunters

Hey any Eastern Shore Hunters here.  I’m going out first thing Nov. 25 for rifle hunting.  Not good enough with a bow to get the job done, but love archery target shooting.  I’m going to the Breakfast Cafe for breakfast, they’re opening at 4am, then hitting the tree stand  I have along the edge of a friends fields.  I’m located in West Ocean City, let me know where your from.

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Published by Double s on 01 Apr 2011

REMINDER: No Selling. This is for Archery, Hunting Blogs & Articles only.

Selling is NOT allowed in the ArcheryTalk Articles and Blogs. For sale or trade items belong only in the ArcheryTalk Classifieds. Posts selling or trading will be deleted. This section is for Articles and Blogs related to Archery and Bow Hunting. Any post not related to Archery or Bow hunting will be considered Spam and trashed and the user deleted. Questions about Bows, Equipment, etc. need to go into the Archerytalk Forum under the correct section. Spammers will be automatically deleted.

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Published by archerchick on 10 Feb 2011

Teriyaki Jerky ~By Steve Barde


Bow And Arrow
August 1972

Teriyaki Jerky ~By Steve Barde
How To Turn An Old Indian Treat Into An Oriental Masterpiece

JERKY HAS BEEN A food staple for trappers,
hunters and outdoorsmen for years. There are several commercial
brands, but I found they were too dry, too hot or
too brittle. What do you do with a situation like that? You
turn it into a do·it·yourself project.

A friend jerked a deer last year and stacked the dried
meat in open jars for future use. He offered me a handful
which I gladly accepted, finding to my dismay it had too
much pepper for my taste. He had made it, to go with his
home brew beer.

l was after a food item I could make myself with little
trouble. Something that would fit into a jacket or camo
pocket for field munching. It couldn’t be too brittle, since I
don’t like pocket crumbs and, if the jerky made me thirsty
it created another problem.

One of our favorite family dishes is teriyaki steak.
The idea hit me to use my wife’s sauce recipe for the
jerky. What did I have to lose if I tested small quantities?

We concocted the teriyaki sauce as follows:
3/4 bottle shoyu or teriyaki sauce
1/2 cup sugar (white or brown for richer and sweeter sauce)
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon monosodium glutamate
1 tablespoon ginger
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 cup saki optional

There are several ways to cut meat into strips for jerky.
The Indians start on the outside of a section of meat about
one-quarter to one-half-inch thick, as big as they want and
cut in a circle until they reach the center. They often ended
with strips of jerky six feet long. These cured by drying on
racks in the sun. Flies were no bother since it was all lean
meat with no fatty tissues.

This was more complicated than l wanted to make it.
The sugar in my sauce would draw flies as well as bees. My
first flank steak jerky was cut several ways. The steak itself
was about one-half inch thick. My first cuts were about
one-half inch wide running with the grain of the meat. The
second steak was cut by quartering across the grain to make
the jerky less chewy, yet not too brittle. The third steak
was cut across the grain with the muscle structure of the
meat.

The sauce was poured over the meat which had been
placed in an open dish. The strips ranged from eight inches
long to little sections. All of it went into the sauce which
covers two pounds of beef. This was placed in the refrigerator
to marinate overnight. The strips were turned from time
to time and the entire glop stirred.

The next day I took the jerky from the refrigerator,
removed the strips from the sauce and placed them on a
grill used for broiling in the oven. The sauce was allowed to
drain off each section as it was placed on the grill.
When the meat was all on the grill the remaining sauce
was poured back into the bottle for future use. The meat
was placed in an oven at a low temperature, 100-125
degrees, and left for eight to ten hours. You could cure the
jerky in the sun, if you wanted to build a screened cage to
keep the bugs out.

Since the meat was on the grill it didn’t require turning,
but samples were tried from time to time to test taste and
dryness. When the entire batch seemed right, it was removed
from the oven and allowed to cool. The taste was
even better than l had hoped for. The sugar gave it a bit of
sweetness; the marinade from the teriyaki gave it a great
flavor. The only test left was to determine how long it
would last without spoiling.

The different methods of cutting were found to be
similar as far as curing. The chewiest meat was cut with the
grain. The crossgrain crumbled when moved about. The
best for my use proved to be the quarter-cut jerky. It was
rigid enough to carry, but not as chewy as the straight cut.
I never did test for longevity since the family kept
munching and it didn’t last long.

If you are lucky enough to have some venison in the
freezer and you fill tags again, it might be a good idea to
jerk your old venison before you freeze the fresh meat and
add it to the chest. Venison makes excellent jerky.
I had some whitetail roasts that were getting freezer
burn. That was my excuse for jerking it anyway. I cut the
roasts into slabs about one-half-inch thick, using my hunting
knife. These slabs were cut again, quarter grain, into
strips about one—half inch thick. I wasn’t critical on the
cutting, since the thicker pieces work well but take longer
to cure.

I thought the beef jerky was good, but the Texas white-
tail was excellent. This batch of jerky filled two half—gallon
plastic containers that were stored with holes in the lid.
Never put jerky into a tightly closed container. When hunting
season rolled around a month or so later I found to my
dismay all my jerky had been consumed by the children
who thought it better than candy and of course some of the
older members of the family who dipped their hands into
the jug to get just a nibble or two. It makes a great snack
item.

This year I will make another batch of beef jerky to take
into the field. About the only way l am going to manage
this is to make it the week I plan to leave and lock it up!
Good luck with yours and, if anyone manages to get enough
to last for a good spoilage test, let me know the results.<——<<<

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Published by archerchick on 07 Sep 2010

Bowhunting The Biggest Grouse – By Sam Fadala


BOW & ARROW – OCTOBER 1980

Bowhunting The Biggest Grouse – By Sam Fadala

RAIN WAS NOT in the forecast. But the minute my brother
Nick and I discussed limbering up our bows and putting some
sage hens in the pot, we were greeted by a deluge from the
skies. We climbed into the four-wheel—drive anyway, as the sky
crackled with lightning and clouds as grim as a tornado funnel moved
in.

“Aw, don’t worry about it,” I assured Nick. “It’ll clear up. The
weatherman says so.” As I expounded on my theories, Nick carefully
wrapped plastic sheeting around his camera. Being a non—resident, and
never having hunted the sage grouse, he was hedging his bets. If there
were no birds around, he would save the day by shooting some hopefully
worthwhile film.
“Some of the best pictures I’ve ever taken were in lousy weather,”
Nick lectured, showing his great confidence in my
assurance that the rain would stop. “I don’t know why people put their
cameras away when the thunder-storms start up.” He pointed to two horses
standing close in a field, a dark sky behind them.
“That’s what I mean.”

Water buffalo aren’t always found around water.
Rock- chucks aren’t always in the rocks. Mountain lions
are not always in the mountains. But more likely than not, sage hens
are in the sage. And we had an area of literally thousands of acres of the fragrant
weed all to ourselves. The rain had something to do with it, certainly, but after
the opening day or two of sage grouse season, there is usually scant
activity, and this was the middle of the week.

We got our birds. And l was lucky enough to take mine as they
walked in the brush twenty and thirty yards away, both on the move
and using only one arrow on each. l was proud. I sure had missed
some good opportunities a few days earlier. lf the rain had continued
as a downpour, I doubt that we would have had much luck, but it
dwindled down to a friendly spattering of droplets and for bowhunting,
that was not so bad. The birds held terribly tight to their
foliage cover, and we knew they would, so we looked hard, moving
slowly. And when we did find our covey, the sage grouse moved away
at a walk instead of flying. They don’t like to fly in the wet.
Sage hens are the largest grouse in the country. Records show a
huge male bird that weighed in at eight pounds, but this is rare, sort of
like the whitetail deer that dressed over 350 pounds. A fine male will
go five pounds, however, and I have taken a couple of sixes. The lady birds
don’t weigh that much, tipping the scales at about three pounds usually,
and often even less. After hunting quail—size birds, it is almost a shock to
have a limit of only two to three sage grouse in your game jacket. They feel
like several limits of smaller birds. But size alone is not the main reason for
hunting the sage grouse. Sure, it’s fun to get such a large-winged treat as this
creature is, but there is much more to the chase than that. I like the country.

It is not difficult terrain, and it is relaxing to pad along through the
flatlands. Sometimes, the tall sage can be tough to negotiate, but most sage-
brush country is rolling or even flat, and there are many little trails through
it. Often, these birds will demand a good deal of walking, but walking in such
gentle territory is no problem; certainly nothing like chasing chukars.
The sage hen is also fun to hunt because the season generally comes in
early Fall, a hospitable time of the year in all of the sage hen states. Usually,
it does not rain. Usually, the sun is out. And our rainy trek was a rare one.
I have hunted the hens quite a number of times, but only twice has
Old Man Thunder roared at me.And I like the nature of the bird
itself. It is plenty of challenge, especially for an archer. But it runs in
good-sized coveys and when that bevy of birds is broken up, there is still
hope of closing the gap on the bunch and taking a couple birds out of it.

The sage hen is depleted by bad weather, especially by rain during the time
when the chicks are newborn, and naturally the varmints work on them.
The badger is rough on nests, and so is the skunk. All in all, it makes sense to
harvest these birds, and game departments know this. Since the largest
range of the sage hen habitat has become city, farmland and civilized in other ways,
there are no vast coveys left over all of the West, but there are still many, many
terrific locales left to hunt. If the hunter does not harvest his fair share, nature will.
The birds get up early, but they are sort of like me, rising from bed at a decent hour,
but groping around until the blood begins to flow in the veins and the eyeballs can focus.
So, for the first hour or so of the morning, in the dimly lit part of the day. activity is
minimal. Then, when the sun is fully above the horizon and beaming its
friendly warmth into the earth, the sage hens stroll to the waterhole. That
waterhole can be a key hunk of geography for the sage bird hunter, especially if
he is toting the bow and arrow, for the birds can be intercepted along
the trail and a nice close standing shot is possible.
Some folks reading this can probably down a sage hen in flight. If I ever
do it, I am going to mount the bird, save the arrow, enshrine the bow in a
glass case and give myself a tall trophy, There is little chance that this will ever
happen, however. The bird is a strong flier, but he prefers to walk. And when
I get one perambulating through the brush, I’m pretty happy about it.
Knowing the birds like that early morning drink, it is wise to stay around that
waterhole located before the hunt – the pond that had the big bird tracks
around it — and look.

Here it comes again. I know people get tired of my praising binoculars, but they
work and I want other hunters to have success, so I always suggest the glass.
(No, I do not own a binocular company.) From any swell in the earth
that can serve as a vantage point, I will search all around the waterhole for the
incoming birds. The territory I cover optically is large, as far as I can see.
Should the birds be spotted, I try to head them off. A stationary bowman is
not going to frighten the sage grouse. But move too much, and the
whole covey is liable to burst into the air and away. In the early part of the
season, an archer need not be all that careful, and I have walked up to first-
day birds as if they were semi—tame. Two days later, the same flocks are
rising from cover a hundred, two hundred yards out. They normally lift
straight up, and a really good archer should be able to nail a bird at that
point, when it is sort of stopped in space, as it were, before leveling out.

They are not the world’s fastest flier, but neither are they slow. And once
the full head of steam is up and they are really in flight, an archer is going
to have to be Howard Hill good in order to slip an arrow through one.
I actually did — and this should be in Ripley ’s Believe It Or Not — take one bird
out of the air. But I would hardly claim it as a great shot. The big male
was just coming up and preparing to level out and it was about ninety per—
cent luck that I let go of the arrow just at that precise moment. In fact, luck
was probably ninety—nine percent responsible.

If the birds do jump from under-foot and wing out over the flats, I always watch
them as carefully as possible. Not to be a broken record, but the
glass can come in very handy again. I don’t always tote the specs, but when
I have them along, I never regret it, for the landing site of the bird can be
picked out. And this is the key — pick out some object near the landing site
so that you arrive at the right place. I have watched a covey land, and then
had a tough time finding the exact place because I forgot to pick out a
mark to guide me.

The birds are usually not exactly where they came down, but the archer
should get to the spot as rapidly as possible and then scout around slowly.
Another trick to keep in mind is to search the ground when the flock
takes off, be it the first jump or the second, for often a few stragglers are
behind and these can be nailed as they walk off.
After getting water, food is next on the list, and food to the sage hen is,
not surprisingly, sage. They love the
leaves and blossoms. This is high-energy food, by the way, and in some
places elk, moose and deer, as well as the ever-present antelope of the sage-
brush plains, would be hurt badly by the depletion or removal of sagebrush,
especially when the dead of Winter has set in. After looking around the
waterhole, if no luck is granted me, I’ll shovel off and pace out the sagebrush.
This means a leisurely stroll, not a high speed chase. The birds feed slowly, too,
and a patient archer can stroll right into the middle of a covey and take his pick
of the big ones.

If the birds are on the spooky side, it is not rare to have to stalk them
with great care. Sage hens have all of the normal attributes of the avian
world — they are none too bright, but they can see like, well, like birds ~
hawks, owls and the like, and they can hear well, too. But they will often let a
hunter approach closely, if he goes slowly and if they have not been
chased over the landscape by too many people.

The big thing is seeing the hens, for they have the finest camouflage any
creature could ask for — neutral gray coloring. Around sage, they blend
right in, and even in greenery they are none to easy to see unless they move.
Naturally, when a whole flock stands out on an open hillside, they can be
sighted, but I have found a large covey, upward of forty birds, right on
the flats. They should have stood out like a cocktail gown on a heavyweight
boxer, but I did not spot the crowd of birds until one moved.

The archer who plans for sage hens should, I feel, tote along the same bow
that he would use for big game. Why? Well, certainly not for the power.
These soft—feathered birds are not very hard to put down, and my experience
with a broadhead is to have the bird flop over as if struck by a rifle. But by
using the big-game bow, a good thing happens — practice for big game is
assured. The hunter has a chance to get in some shooting at game, under
outdoor conditions, pulling the weight he will pull in the field.

I use my standard hunting bow set at its standard draw weight for my
sage grouse hunting. And I have used many kinds of arrows. I have no preference here,
as long as the arrow shoots in the bow. I do insist upon a humane, razor-sharp
broadhead, however. Again, let the hunter choose his own. I have had good luck
with the Wasp using three blades. To the best of my knowledge, these
are the states that have sage grouse, but I don’t think all of them are open
to hunting every year. They are: Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Nevada,
Oregon, Washington, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.

The reader should write a note to the state of his choice and see if there will be a season,
when it will run, the limits and so forth. At least a heavy fee license is not required, nor is
a special drawing. A bird license can run about fifty bucks nowadays.
Some people enjoy camping out for sage hens, as they would for big game,
I am in this rank. I love it. The weather, as already expounded upon, is generally good;
not always, but usually.And it is fun to come home and eat the birds around the campfire, sharing with family and fellow hunters. In my opinion, sage grouse that are no good to eat
are rare. I have never had one I did not like. I have never fed one to any person who didn’t
say he or she enjoyed it. But part of the eatin’ is in the preparin’, and the best T-bone
steak ill-treated is only so much foul—tasting protein.

The first step toward assuring a good tasting bird is to dress it right away. I carry a
canteen of water when I remember to. And a little clean rag goes along, too. I
draw the birds, saving the edible inner parts, from which I sometimes make a
gravy. The drawn birds are rinsed in the body cavity with the water, and
then both cavity and hands can be dried with the clean cloth.
At home, using a boning knife, I strip the meat away from all of the
breast area, leaving the drumsticks and wings as they are. All of the meat is
soaked for two to three hours in a mixture of milk and eggs, beaten well, to
which has been added garlic salt and onion salt, pepper and paprika. Just
enough sauce is made to make contact with the meat. And in a bowl of meat,
about a half bowl of liquid can be added, the meat turned often so that it
soaks thoroughly. Some people put in a tad of fresh oregano to the sauce, a
tad being somewhere between a smidgen and a pinch, about a sixteenth of a
teaspoon, I suppose. Next the meat is dropped into plain
clean flour, breaded and fried in half margarine, half pure lard, hot enough
to cook all the way through, but not so hot that the breading is burned.
That’s it. Good eating!

Sage hens are a lot of fun to hunt, and a wonderful excuse for getting
into the outdoors in early Fall. Some states offer big-game archery seasons
during the sage hen hunting time, and this makes for double pleasure. A
quick check with the game departments in question will bring the facts
to the shooter. And since the birds frequent sage country, easy to walk in, hard to get
lost in, an out-of-stater stands a good chance of finding his quarry without
having a lot of prior knowledge of the area. A bowhunter can do worse. <—<<

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Published by KurtD on 14 Jan 2010

DO NOT POST ITEMS FOR SALE IN THIS SECTIONS (Blogs and Articles)!

This section of Archerytalk is just for Blogs and Articles.

Please use the Archerytalk Forums TO POST A FREE CLASSIFIED AD

Thanks,

admin

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Published by Kelly Johnson on 07 Apr 2008

Venison 101. An overview for beginners

Hey ya’ll. I’ve been cooking professionally for over 20 years now and thought I’d pass along some tips that may help get the most enjoyment after you tag the big one

First we’ll talk about Venison.

Vension is lean. Made even leaner by the fact that the fat is not pleasurable at all because it coagulates at a much lower temp than farm raised animals.
What that means is if you add venison fat to a sausage recipe when you eat it and take a drink….it turns to vaseline in your mouth. So….trim all the fat off. We can add a more palatable fat later.

There are 2 major factors in how your animal will taste inherently.
1. Diet.
A Whitetail from the Rocky Mountians that lives in big woods will have a very different flavor profile than one from the agro region in Illinois for example.

2. Processing.
How the animal was killed and handled during butchering. I’ll do butchering later if there’s interest so for now let’s just say gut it, skin it and cool it as quickly as possible

Next let’s break these up into 2 parts.
Texture. How tough, tender, stringy etc…physical traits in mouth feel, “bite” and texture
And
Flavor. Gaminess, piney or sagey-ness etc

Texture.
The “whys”

The older the animal and/or rougher the terrain the tougher it’ll be.

The harder the muscle works, the tougher the meat will be.

The leaner the diet, the tougher it will be. The more protien rich, the more tender.

The “Fresher” the tougher. Letting an animal hang or age properly goes a long way in tenderizing it through natural enzymes breaking down the tough connective tissue. I recommend 7-14 days for a whole carcass depending on age and size at around 41 degrees.

The thinner, the more tender. The thicker the tougher. Thin slices off a roast or raw meat sliced and pounded thin (like scallopine) before cooking will always work.

The “Hows”
Roasts.

1.Don’t Boil it. Don’t boil it…don’t boil it!
Boiling meat is a great way to waste time and ruin meat. SIMMER! Tiny bubbles! Simmer has the heat without the agitation. Bring it to a boil and QUICKLY lower the heat to low simmer. As low as you can get it and still get a bubble every 2-3 seconds. Cover it and cook till tender…1.5-4 hrs depending on size.

2.Use liquid….wine, stock, broth, water, beer etc. Not submerged in it but a couple inches in the bottom will help keep it moist and cook evenly.

3. Add fat.Drape raw bacon over the top before you put the lid on, rub a little butter on top the last 2-3 minutes of cooking etc. This will all but gaurantee it be moist and not dry out.

Thinner cuts and steaks

1. Don’t overcook it. Medium rare to medium will be most tender.

2. Don’t boil it! If you start with thin slices for salisbury steak or something when you add the stock or gravy…simmer.

3. Pound it or jaccard it. (Search Jaccard…great tool for the wild game chef and well worth the $ IMO) Pounding with a meat mallet or jaccarding breaks down the connective tissue by force.

4. Marinate it. I’m not a big fan of marination in general but it does help a little. Acid is the tenderizer…(it’s the vinegar in italian dressing )

Flavor

The coppery, bloody, “gamey” flavor can be offset by a myriad of ingredients.
Acids and sugars mask it well but you may need to add a fat to offset the acid….which works out well becasue it’s generally so lean the fat will help with mouth feel and “roundness” anyway.

Examples of acidic ingredients are…
Vinegars (Balsamic is great or apple cider maybe)
Wine
Beer
Fruits. Currants, blueberries, cranberries, cherries, raisins etc.

If you want to test this take your standard venison tenderloin and cook half in a hot pan with whatever gravy you use or sauce you make. Now add 1/2 Tbsp of red wine vinegar to your sauce and taste it again. You’ll see what I mean.

Now the straight vinegar goes a long way. Just a touch in the sauce. If you add too much a little sugar will help even it out and add a litt ebutter or oil to smooth it over. I’ll often mix Cider Vin and Sugar and cook till it’s a syrup and keep that around the kitchen in a small bottle to add as I need it.

Now unless you like sweet and sour everything you may need to smooth some of them out with a little fat. Add a little pat of butter to the sauce at the end maybe or a drizzle of GOOD olive oil where it fits will round these out and bring the flavors to the meat instead of having the meat overpower everything else.

Here’s the theories at work
Venison loin with Chocolate Balsamic, Baby root vegetables and Horseradish sprouts.
Venison Loin

Well that’s all pretty generic stuff and I hope it gives a little insight and maybe help someone enjoy their kill a little bit more.

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Published by mark kennedy on 01 Apr 2008

Chew On This

I took some time to fiddle around with some new foods, and ingredients over the last few days and I gotta tell ya, some of these recipes are great.  I’m a huge fan of jerky myself, so i figured i’d post the rest of the recipes up here for everybody to try.  Some of them can be a little on the spicy side so be careful.

Chinese Beef Jerky,
3 Lbs. Flank Steak or London Broil

MARINADE
1/2 Cup Light Soy Sauce
4 1/2 Tbs Honey
4 1/2 Tbs Dry Sherry
6 Large Cloves Garlic Minced
1 1/2 Tbs Ginger Fresh Minced
1 1/2 Tbs Red Pepper crushed
1 1/2 Tbs Sesame Oil
Dash White Pepper

Cut meat in half, lengthwise and slice diagonally crosswise into paper thin strips 1 1/2 to 2 inches wide and 4 inches long. Transfer to shallow pan. Combine marinade ingredients and rub thoroughly into meat. Arrange meat on racks and let dry at cool room temperature overnight (do not refrigerate).

Preheat oven to 250 F. Line two large baking sheets with foil and set wire racks on top of each baking sheet. Arrange meat on racks in single layer. Bake 30 minutes.

Reduce heat to 175 F and continue drying meat another 40 minutes. Meat should be lightly brown but not burnt. Let meat  continue to dry on racks at cool room temperature overnight before packing into jars.

Dried meat can be brushed lightly with sesame oil for additional flavor and shine. Makes about 36 pieces.

cook these next few in the same manner, be careful there pretty wild

Hot & Tangy Jerky
1 tsp salt 2 cloves crushed garlic
1/4 tsp cracked pepper 2 tbs A-1 sauce
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper 3 tbs Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp onion powder 1/2 tsp paprika

Hot and Spicy
1/4 c soy sauce
1/4 c Worcestershire sauce
1/4 c Cayenne pepper sauce
1 t garlic powder
1 t onion powder
1-2 t black pepper
1 t chile powder
1 c water

Hot and smokey
1 part liquid smoke
2 parts Worchestershire suuce
4 parts soy sauce
lots of (freshly) ground black pepper

Now many of you have read the antelope recipe posted yesterday, well heres an antelope recipe for jerky, though i haven’t personally tried this one because i have never shot an antelope!

CAJUN ANTELOPE JERKY

Ingredients:
• 10 lb antelope meat
• 1/2 of a small bottle hot sauce
• 1/8 cup lemon juice
• 10 oz Worchestershire sauce
• 6 oz Soy sauce
• 1/8 cup Caynne pepper
• 1/2 small Bottle onion salt
• 1/2 small Bottle liquid smoke

Directions:
1. Mix ingredients.
2. Marinate 24-30 hrs.
3. Dehydrate in dehydrator or a 150-degree oven.

I hear that this one has a very sweet taste, i’ll have to order some antelope so i can try it myself

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Published by wyojon137 on 31 Mar 2008

Don’t Like Antelonpe, Then Cook It Like This

It seems that a lot of people here where I live really give Antelope a beating on how it tastes. Now I will be the first to admit that, yes it is quite strong, often has a bad smell and requires one heck of a recipe. Well I happen to have one that is just that. I came across this a while ago and figured that I would share it with you guys here on the talk. It is cheep and easy and will be sure to help assist you on getting rid of some of the antelop out of your freezer, I know it has mine.

Sweet and Sour Antelope

1 pound anntelope round steak, cut into thin strips

1 3/4 cups water

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup soy sauce

1 clove garlic, whole

1/3 cup sugar

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1/3 cup pineapple juice

3/4 cup pineapple chunks

1 green pepper cut into chunks

Place antelope, water, salt, soy sauce and garlic in a two quart sauce pan. Cook on HIGH until at a boil, about 5 minutes. Cover, reduce heat and simmer until meat is barely cooked, about 12-15 minutes. Remove meat and set aside. Dicard garlic. Strain broth through cheesecloth to remove meat drippings; save broth. (I am cheep so a coffe filter works just fine.)

In a sauce pan, blend the sugar, caornstarch, vinegar, pineapple juice and ginger until smooth. Gradually stir in meet broth and mix well. Cook on HIGH until sauce in thick and transparent; stirring thoroughly about every two minutes until done, about 6-8 mintues.

Combine sauce ith antelope meat, add pineapple and green pepper. Allow mixture to sit befor serving. Serve over rice and enjoy.

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