Archive for the 'Pro Shooters' Category

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Published by admin on 11 Apr 2013

A SIMPLE REMINDER MADE THE BEST SEASON EVER

A SIMPLE REMINDER MADE THE BEST SEASON EVER

by Ted Nugent

Kid Rock called and asked if I would teach him to bowhunt. He said Jerry Lee Lewis had taught him how to rock the piano, so he would accept only the masters to light his way. Who’s he gonna call? Tom Petty?

Game on!

As one of the world’s most talented and successful performers, I knew better than anyone how important it was for my friend to escape the mayhem of rock-n-roll and cleanse his soul with the mystical flight of the arrow. Plus we all know that the more backstraps one personally harvests and consumes, the more intense and soulful one’s music and life.

Uncle Ted, Strap Assassin1 to the rescue.

We were hot and heavy into the October bowseason up in Michigan, and as a fellow MotorCity Madman, Bob made the short trip to our sacred hunting grounds and the archery lessons began post haste.

Already tuned into the joys and marksmanship disciplines of hunting game with firearms, Bob wanted to elevate his hunting to the intense challenge of getting to fulldraw on elusive critters up close and personal, right in their face with a sharp stick.

On cue, Bob produced a brand new bow from his vehicle and told me how his buddy had set him all up with the ultimate gear for his bowhunting quest.

I tried to subdue my predictable fears, but alas, the bowhunting industries’ self -inflicted suicidal curse reared its ugly head again. Bob’s nice new bow was set at nearly 80 pound draw weight, and though we could draw it back, albeit with much effort and anti-archery gyrations, I took the matter into my own hands, drew if back and let go, dry firing the contraption causing it to blow to smithereens.

After much explanation, my archery pro-shop buddies whipped out a bow set up exactly like mine with a nice, graceful 50 pound draw weight.

Bob drew this bow back effortlessly and smiled broadly at the graceful upgrade, relieved that it was dramatically better than that other T-Rex killing machine he wrestled with a moment ago.

I tuned him into the basic archery form, mindset, touch and hand-eye coordination routine to get him on target, and within mere moments, my rock-n-roll buddy was zipping arrow after arrow into the vitals of our 3D targets. He liked it a lot.

I just so happened to have Don Williams on hand, a highly respected Olympic archery coach and all around “physics of spirituality” martial arts guru to assist Bob with the ultimate fine tuning of becoming the arrow.

I sat back and watched Don coaching Bob with his form, emphasizing precision mental focus and repetitious muscle memory.

When Don removed the sight pins from Bob’s bow, positioned him five feet from a large bale target with a small black dot in the middle, and had him repeat his shot procedure over and over again, a blinding bright light went off in my head as I recalled this exact same procedure being taught to me by my hero Fred Bear, way back in the 1970s.

With no intention of hitting the black dot, but rather concentrating on controlled, repetitious shot procedure while focusing intently on a given minute point of aim, I came to realize that my occasional missing and dreaded target panic hiccups were due to the mistake of focusing on my sight pins instead of the exact, tiny spot I needed to “will” my arrow into.

Oh glory, glory hallelujah!

I grabbed my bow, removed the pins, and stood side by side with Bob as we carefully executed killer shot after killer shot.

After a few dozen arrows like that, we re-attached our sight pins back onto our bows, stood back at the thirty yard line, and allowed our bodies and brains to celebrate the same exacting archery that we had at five feet, but now our muscle memory took over, and as we owned the black dots on each target, our sight pins magically floated onto the dot, we loaded our triggers and the bow went off.

Well, Kid was ecstatic, I was moved, and I went on to have the greatest bowhunting season of my life, making shot after shot, kill after kill, firing off the prettiest, most consistent arrows of my sixty plus years of bowhunting.

Throughout the season I continue to practice the “blind bale” routine, and constantly remind myself that I mustn’t look at the sight pin, but always the tiniest of spot on the crease behind the shoulder of my target animal.

When you watch our Ted Nugent Spirit of the Wild TV show on Outdoor Channel this season, watch all those pretty arrows disappearing into unsuspecting herbivores’ pumpstations, and know that the procedure outlined here will dramatically upgrade you archery and bowhunting accuracy and joys.

Kid Rock is on his way, but sometimes the old dogs have to go back and remember the old tricks. Backstraps are us

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Published by admin on 26 Feb 2013

Tom Jennings Passes

STRAIGHT SHOT

with frank addington, jr.

 

Monday, February 25, 2013

From my friend Sherwood Schoch:

It is with regret I am informing our archery community of the passing of Tom Jennings on this date, February 25. I have been asked to produce an obituary and eulogy which will follow shortly. Warmest respect, Sherwood Schoch

tom_jennings

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changed archery. He was a pioneer. An icon. And who could forget that hat??!?! He was at our place here in WV in the early 1980’s and people loved having him sign their T Shirts, hats and bows. For many, many years we got a Christmas card from “Tom and Hazel Jennings” until sadly she passed. That was years ago. Anyway, Tom passed today and he will be missed, another archery icon gone.
Here is an interview I did with Tom with Sherwood’s help in 2006. Probably one of Tom’s last archery related interviews, due to him living for many of his last years in such a remote location.

Anyway, wanted to share this news with you. The late Rev. Stacy Groscup thought alot of Tom too.

The photo I have attached was circa 1980/81 with my dad and I with Tom at our place.

RIP Tom. You will be missed.

Sadly, my “inner circle” of archery friends, heroes, and icons is getting smaller yearly.
Shoot Straight,

Frank Addington, Jr.
PS

You may also want to read Sherwood’s interview too, it ties in very well w Tom’s. I know this news must have been tough for Sher to share. Praying for him and Tom’s family.

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Published by bargyle6550 on 30 Jan 2013

RIVERSIDE ARCHERS

Feb shoot

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Published by admin on 08 Oct 2012

TED NUGENT’S GUN COUNTRY-SO WHAT ELSE IS NEW?

by Ted Nugent

The jury is not still out on whether or not young Ted was uppity beyond compare. My youthful energy level was measured in ballistic Richter Scale increments. The term “whirling dervish” was created in an attempt to explain my indefatigable life’s velocity. I didn’t have ADD, I had GSFS, known in the Nugent household as Gonzo Sniper Focus Syndrome. Aim small miss small was not a casual consideration, but a driving force in our quality of life obsession through a learned, disciplined higher level of awareness that is derived from gungho triggertime.

Can you say “bulls-eye!”?

Video games and Smart phone electronics would not have then and cannot now compete with the joys of marksmanship fun in all its forms. My father, Warren Henry Nugent, was a hero warrior drill sergeant in the US Army Cavalry during WWII, and he brought that maniacal disciplinarian charge home with him without missing a beat, straight into his parenting regimen. Dad didn’t tolerate no fooling around, especially with firearms.

Thank you dad.

Every human being ever born is programmed to be fascinated by projectile management. Rocks, spears, arrows, fastballs, marbles, Hail Mary 100 yard touchdown passes, grenades, Fat Man, Little Boy and ultimately, the hand-eye, triggerfinger, breathing, sight control, spirit harnessing perfection of super accurate bullet placement.

There are only two kinds of people in this world; those of us who celebrate the thrills of marksmanship and those wishing they could.

Based on our driveway of spent brass, I would challenge any family alive to a shootout with my shootemup tribe of gun nuts.

In a world strangled by the curse of politically correct denial, a media and academia of dopey liberals have brainwashed a strange subspecies of beings into accepting and embracing the pathetic condition of unarmed and helpless. And the slaughter rages on in gun free zones around the world. Shame.

Here’s a life saving alert to the dependent masses; unarmed and helpless is unarmed and helpless, and the evil running amok here, there and everywhere appreciate you very much, for they are assured in your gun free zones that you are incapable of doing a damn thing when they decide to eat you alive, beat you to death, rape,rob, assault, torture and do with you as they wish, for you, my poor pathetic sheep, have chosen to be unarmed and helpless. To bend over to evil is as soulless as soulless gets. No thank you.

For those of us who dearly appreciate the precious gift of life, we follow our powerful instincts for self preservation and have made it a priority to be ready to defend ourselves. The lunatic fringe can squawk and moan all they want, the rest of us need no interpretation of “keep and bear”.

“Keep” means it’s mine and you can’t have it, and “bear” means one thing and one thing only; I have one or two on me, and they’re loaded. Drive safely.

So when Discover Channel asked if we would like to produce a TV show titled TED NUGENT’S GUN COUNTRY, I told them it is already in progress so just bring the cameras and push the record button.

Our new show airs Wednesday October 10 at 10pm ET, and it simply celebrates and promotes the self evident truth how 99.999% of American gun owning families use our guns on a regular basis for all the right reasons. The same 99.999% of Americans with guns that will never use our guns in a crime or for any negative misuse whatsoever.

We train, we plink, we shoot, we compete, we hunt, we have unlimited fun perfecting the use of these wonderful tools for the most pragmatic, utilitarian functions. We shoot billions and billions of rounds of ammo each year, and we own more firepower today than any society in the history of planet earth.

And for the brainwashed cult of denial drooling in the shadow of a gun hating media and White House, with all this unprecedented increase in guns and ammo in American citizens’ hands, the use of guns in crime is at an alltime low.

It’s not just Ted Nugent’s Gun Country, it’s working hard, playing hard America’s Gun Country and we could not be more proud of it. Tune in to the Discovery Channel, for like our award winning Ted Nugent Spirit of the Wild on Outdoor Channel, witness how real Americans enjoy the great outdoors and peace through superior firepower.

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Published by Steady Form on 20 Sep 2012

New Product Steady Form

Love your thoughts and any questions you may have about the Steady Form Torque Eliminator

Steady Form©

The Torque Eliminator

               To avoid torque, the enemy of accurate aim, you know you need to keep your bow arm rock steady. Steady Form’s Torque Eliminator System is all you need to dramatically improve your accuracy, each and every time you aim, whether you’re facing a prey animal or a competitive target.

          The secret lies in Steady Form’s seven points of adjustment for a customized fit –a comfortable fit you create yourself, with just a few adjustments—and one that will make it feel as if your bow is an extension of your arm. Your good, steady arm.

 

          Steady Form’s innovative and unique patent pending design is Aircraft grade, ultra-light aluminum. This100% anodized accessory was created and designed to fit every bow.

 

How does it work?

 

The Steady Form system simply mounts to your bow or on your own string stopper rod. This system comes complete with a custom mounting bracket, fastener, ultra-lite rod, two Allen wrenches and the patented pending Steady Form accessory.

The customized designed bracket adjusts for right or left-handed shooters and adjusts for perfect comfort. Once installed, with just a few simple adjustments you’re “locked in,” and will feel truly at one with your bow, with more confidence than you’ve ever experienced.

 

Steady Form provides an additional anchor point to dramatically improve your comfort, stance, form, and accuracy. You’ll gain an increase in performance within just a few rounds of shooting and be so impressed with the results, you’ll wonder how you ever got along before without this new, essential accessory for all serious archers.

 Check us out at www.steadyform.com

                                                   So get ready, get steady,

 improve your aim and get “Locked In” today with

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Torque Eliminator System!

 

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Published by fasst on 28 Jun 2012

Levi Morgan Featured AT Chat!

                                                                Levi Morgan Featured Chat. 6/27/12 9pm EST

 

Bowmaddness–                Hi Levi, Have you archery hunted in PA this year if so have you had any luck?

Levi Morgan– I hunted in Greene county PA this past season with no luck…hunted public ground and it was tough…I killed a good one there a couple years ago though

Double S- Thank you Levi for all the things you do for the great sport of archery. That’s all. pass

Levi Morgan – Man I appreciate that….It’s been good to me

Ghost23– Levi, what is your greatest accomplishment in archery?

Levi Morgan– My greatest accomplishment in archery ……wow….that’s a good ???……It would have to be winning Louisville!

Ohio Mossy Oak– … Ohio Deer harvest numbers and deer/vehicle accidents have been on the decline for multiple years and many hunters are saying they are not seeing the deer they used to, and that herd numbers may be down overall .Not buck numbers, but in general……. I know you hunt and manage land in Ohio. Have you noticed anything of this sort? And how do you feel about increased cost for both Resident an non-resident deer hunters equally, and decreased antlerless bag limits?

Levi Morgan– I definitely feel that deer numbers overall are down in Ohio…but not buck numbers…I think it is due to the liberal rules on doe harvest jumping in the last couple years….I wish the tags wouldn’t go up as well….

PAbowhunter86– Levi, how many shoots do you attend each year?

Levi Morgan– around 15 or 16….its alot but I love competing ….all those are in a 6 month period

SierraMtns– Hey Levi, Any pointers for someone wanting to compete. I have done a couple 3D shoots. There seems like some many different types of competition. How did you get started?

Levi Morgan– I agree and think that there are way too many venues in this sport…..but I would say pick the one that you feel more confident in and the one that you can best practice for!

Levi Morgan– My dad was a huge hunter….and he introduced it to me….

SierraMtns– Cool…thanks

XFBrian– Do swackers really work like they say or is it just tv???

fasst– lol

Levi Morgan– Man if there is one product that I truly believe in…it is swacker I have no issues at all with them…from the design to toughness they are no doubt my favorite bhead….just stay away from the shoulder bone….the only deer I have lost was from a shoulder shot…but if u hit a deer just right in the shoulder with any bhead u r screwed….no need to hit that far forward with that big of a cut

XFBrian                – lmao thanks for your time

XFBrian                – and CONGRATS on the baby

YoungTNArcher– What is the longest shot you have taken at a target? What is your longest shot while hunting?

Levi Morgan–  200 at a target…….I don’t know if I should answer this but oh well…..120 on a mule deer!

Levi Morgan–  thanx xfbrian

YoungTNArcher– Did you hit the mule deer?

Levi Morgan–  Smoked it….but very controlled situation

buckeyeguy2299– BESIDES NAME THAT GAME:)…WHAT IS YOUR FAV HUNTING SHOW ON TV? AND WHAT ABOUT IT DO YOU LIKE?

Levi Morgan – Its Name The Game Jason…lol…and I would say the Drurys stuff…they are awesome hunters and I’ve been watching them since as long as I can remember…I’ve learned alot from them

buckeyeguy2299–  GREAT …….HAVE A GOOD NIGHT BUDDY AND TTYL

ferretboy–  First off, pleasure meeting you again and now my question: Many purists dont consider 3d real archery, we all know that you’re one of the best in the world at that game, how did it feel shutting down the naysayers by having such a huge indoor win and how proud were you to put that one into your vast and growing list of accomplishments? And congratulations on both the Championship and the new baby.

Levi Morgan–  3d is the toughest venue of archery….thats why so many great shooters dont shhow up….u actually have to think and plan…and manage…..and shoot…and judge….Indoors was awesome for me because I never practice that stuff and because people said the only reason I won was because of my yardage….you cant win a 3d on yardage alone

youngbuck98–  oh ok

Levi Morgan–  Indoors are tough because they are so easy everyone can compete…

Levi Morgan-  if that makes sense…lol

youngbuck98–  levi what method do you use to judge yardage?? do you look at the target or go bye the ground

Levi Morgan–  I use a little of both young buck….but mostly target

ferretboy–  total sense, i shoot both and perform better in 3d, for some reason i feel less stress, thank you for the answer

geezer047–  Hey, gonna be hot this weekend if you and Sam need a cold drink of water stop by Koty’s truck. Charlie

Levi Morgan–  Haha…no problem man…I may make Sam stay home in this heat…not good for being 7 months along

hrtlnd164–  Levi, which would you rather have. A 180" buck or another World Championship…(and you can’t say both).

Levi Morgan–  Definitely a 180” buck…easiest one yet…haha

Levi Morgan–  heck a 160

hrtlnd164–  I’m with ya there

ironarcher–  Oh I’m not sure.. ok I guess I didn’t really understand the answer about judging yardage..

ironarcher–  or maybe I missed it haha

Levi Morgan–  I look at the target and study it for detail while taking alot of other things like lighting, terrain, etc. into consideration…if I’m still not confident I will check it with the ground to see if I get something different

ironarcher–  got ya thanks Levi

jrm81–  Who are some the guys that you just flat out enjoy shooting with in 3D and indoors? Also in your opinion, who are some of the up and coming archers that we should keep our eye on?

Levi Morgan–  Guys Like Darrin Christenberry, Nathan Brookes, Danny Mcarthy, Ken Lance, Chance B, and so many I cant name em all…….and a couple up and comers are Garrett Ayresman from WV that kid is awesome…..and Ty Adkins to name a couple….and Jeremy Elliot

masonbanta–  Did you just decide one day to start shooting the Pro stake or did you work your way up to it over the years?

Levi Morgan–  I’ve shot since I was 6 years old and worked my way to a win in the mens open class in the ASA when i was 13…I quit for a couple years and when I came back I was hungry to be the best of the best so I jumped right in

masonbanta–  Thanks Levi and good luck this weekend.

Levi Morgan–  thank u

rdraper_3–  Can’t really think of any questions right now. I’d just like to say congrats to you and Samantha and good luck in Marengo, OH

Levi Morgan–  thanks so much…really appreciate that

scott*devin–  ohh sorry, Levi do you like the Mathews monster series bows?

Levi Morgan–  Yea I do man…I have had my ups a downs with them by my ups have been amazing…..I love them especially for hunting….but I’ve also won 3 Worlds with a monster 7

sugice–  levi, first it is a pleasure to meet you and I really enjoy your show, now what was your most exciting hunt and which state has presented the most challenging hunt of your career and why?

Levi Morgan–  most exciting was the double double droptine from my dads farm in Ohio…no doubt that’s the most exciting hunt of my life…..most challenging is spot and stalk muleys in the Missouri river breaks of Montana….but that’s also one of my fav hunts….

sugice–  thank you, good luck this weekend and congrats to you and Samantha. If you ever get up to Maine look me up, I've got some great hunting land available.

Leviticus–  Awesome…..MOOSE????

sugice–  absolutely!

sugice–  bear and some big bucks

sugice–  got my permit for a bull this October

Levi Morgan–  awesome

20ftup–  you bought it

tarheelmr7–  what target/lighting/terrain scenarios trick you the most? Can you pick one scenario and give a tip on how not to get my butt kicked by the yardage?

Levi Morgan–  Tarheel—-The one that gets me the most is if the lighting isn’t consistent…if its dark the targets look farther and if its bright the targets look closer…..so if it has been overcast all day and I’m calibrated for that, then all of the sudden the sun comes out and the target is bright…if I’m not careful I will shoot him in the knee…lol

Levi Morgan–  …see ya’

fasst–  lol

tarheelmr7–  thanks man. I’m gonna pm you. Hope to see you this weekend

Levi Morgan–  no problem

youngbuck98–  do you think a c4 is a good bow for target shooting or should I go with the apex 8, either one what would be the length on the front and back bar and how many weights to balance it out good, i shoot b-stinger premiere xl bars

Levi Morgan–  29″ draw and under I would go with c4…over that I would go apex 8….both good target bows….I would start with a 30″ front bar with about 4oz and a 12″ back bar with about 13-15oz

fasst–  I am going to run thru the names that haven’t had a chance to ask a question yet, before we double up. Levi only has a few more minutes slated for the chat!

youngbuck98–  ok thanks man,

Levi Morgan–  no problem

3Dblackncamo–  hey levi, what are your goals in 3D archery right now and how do I get you to Big Pine for some local 3D! good luck in metropolis

Levi Morgan–  I want to win shooter of the year for 3 more years in ASA and help make the organizations better…I’m gonna try to make it out at some point i enjoy shooting out there

AdvanTimberLou–  Levi, congrats on winning Louisville, I was there and see what I thought was the word “manimal” on your shooter belt, what is the meaning behind that?

AdvanTimberLou–  It could have been my bad eyes too, you guys shooting inside outs all day was cool to watch! 🙂

Levi Morgan–  Thats a nick name that Greg Poole gave me…he had that quiver made for me….he says im not all human and that I have to be at least half animal…lol…so he calls me the manimal

fasst–  lol

Fortyneck–  Hey Levi, thanks for your time, In your opinion what peep/sight housing/pin size combo is best suited for hunting at longer distances? Also do you have a favorite older model bowhunting bow that stands out with exceptional accuracy and/or shootability for those that can’t afford the absolute latest equipment.

AdvanTimberLou–  After seeing you shoot, you’re not human! Congrats again and congrats on the future addition!

JHENS87–  sounds like poole

Levi Morgan–  I would go with a 1/8 peep and either a .10 or .19 for pin size but if u can see smaller then I would say go for it….and for an older bow I loved the switch backs

GoosebyFLuFLu–  How long do you plan on shooting professionally? Also do you plan on shooting until you no longer are able to or until is no longer is fun? Thanks for taking the time to answer everyone’s questions.

Levi Morgan–  thanks lou

Fortyneck–  Thanks, BTW Manimal…great show

Levi Morgan–  I’m not real sure…I’ve got a little boy on the way and I can already tell that archery is taking a back seat…as it should….I am going to pray about it as time goes on and we will see what the Lord has in store…good question

GoosebyFLuFLu–  Thanks!

fasst–  good answer!

Levi Morgan–  thanks fortyneck

JHENS87–  Whats your hunting setup for whitetails this year? Any sidebar, lens, longer front stab normally seen in target shooting?

Levi Morgan–  I will be running same as usual for me…mr7 with a 15″ front bar and a 10″ back bar…..7 pin CBE tek hunter but no lense….also gonna use the Helium some I like that bow….especially in blinds

JHENS87–  nice, thanks

Levi Morgan–  no problem

NY911–  Levi – not so much a question, but a comment – thanks for taking a stance with the shenanigans at recent tournaments it really shows how you (and the other Pros who spoke up) care for the future of the sport. Your voice alone equals 100 of ours. Keep tearing it up and good luck on the future addition!

Levi Morgan–  Thanks…I want to do all I can to help these orgs out with rules and decisions…there is a small group of us pros that are starting to work together to get things changed for the better..

Wazz13– Outside of your Pro Hunter’s, what would be your go to arrow for hunting? What would be you goto arrow for 3D?

Levi Morgan–  I would go with a velocity 300 for hunting and TRiple xxxs for 3d

Wazz13                –   Thanks Levi, best of luck and God bless.

archerdad–  nothing just here to observe… congratulations on your good fortune levi the baby and the winnings

Levi Morgan–  thanks guys

hitman846–  In your travels, have you ever had a fan or someone you don’t know tell you “Dude, you should hunt with me for a few days at my place” and took them up on it?

Levi Morgan–  yes and no…not really that spur of the moment but I have had people email me with an idea for a hunt and within the month i was there…not to say I wouldn’t if the circumstance was right….haha

hoytbullrider–  Whats your best advice for a younger shooter , like myself, to get into 3d and indoor when only having a hunting rig (mathews monster) competition against the guys with bows setup just for 3D/indoor , sorry if its a wild question

Levi Morgan–  that’s a good question….I wouldn’t be scared to take my hunting rig to a tournament….that bow doesn’t know its not a tournament bow….while its probably a little more critical and maybe slower and doesn’t have all the bells and whistles it will more than likely still shoot awesome….just think of it this way…if you can beat them with a hunting set up then imagine what u could do with a tourney rig…..

Ohio Mossy Oak–  I wouldn’t mind getting in a follow up if he has time. Or maybe I can just hit him up on facebook?

hoytbullrider–  thanks

Ohio Mossy Oak–  On my last question regarding Ohio deer an tags etc. Did you say you’re in favor of a reasonable increase in cost for Residents an non-resident deer hunters?

Ohio Mossy Oak–  Also..I feel if you own over 50acres even as a non res you should pay less being a property owner…Just wanted to say that

Levi Morgan–  I obviously would rather the price not go up when I think of myself….but if the state is using the money to put back into conservation then a little raise would be ok with me….I agree with u on the landowner thing…I’ve been saying that for years…haha

 Levi Morgan–  not that it matters to them what I think

GoosebyFLuFLu–  Before I leave I wanted to thank you again for taking the time to answer my question and others as well.

Mathews122–  Levi do you have any idea what would be the best 3d tournament bow for a person witha 26 in draw

Levi Morgan–  no problem man. I wish we were all in a room so I could answer in more detail

Levi Morgan–  id say Mathews prestige

Ghost23–  What has been the best archery advice given to you, and how did it affect you as an archer:?

fasst–  OK Folks, let’s all give Levi a big hand for taking the time to host this chat!

JHENS87–  Yep thanks again Levi, been a very good chat

Mathews122–  Thank you

Christopher67–  Thank You

hoytbullrider–  thanks

Double S–  A Big thank you Levi!.

geezer047–  THANKS Levi, see you this weekend. Charlie

PAbowhunter86–  Thank Levi Congrats on becoming a dad no feeling in the world can compare!

20ftup–  Thanks Levi stay cool

fasst–  And Levi, please be sure to tell Greg that I was serious in my last text to him a little while ago!…..lmao

fasst–  levi, can you answer one last question for us please?

Levi Morgan–  Thanks guys I really enjoyed the questions

Levi Morgan–  yes sir

fasst–  go for it Ray

ferretboy–  Thanks a lot Levi Morgan

JHENS87–  Good luck, and try to avoid this 100degree heat your coming into as much as possible haha

rdraper_3–  What would you like to see improve in the IBO? I’d personally like to see the Pro’s shooting on the SAME courses as those in lower classes. I’ve only been in it for 2 years and really like it and plan on going to MBO next year, I’m currently in MBR but the only thing stopping me is the whole adjustable sight thing. I’m deathly afraid I’d forget to adjust it and miss a target.

Ohio Mossy Oak– Thanks alot levi. Getting insight on the deer herd here, from a highly managed ohio land owner like yourself means alot..An re-affirms many takes on the deer herd…Good luck this weekend. And god bless your an yours<

zakseppala– what would be the one tip you would give for someone looking to improve their shooting

rdraper_3-  Thanks for letting me get it in there Travis

Levi Morgan–  O wow ray?…thats a long list…lets see….pros shoot on sight….a legit awards ceremony….a qualification to get ur pro card….a shoot off….20 targets per day….a speed limit….etc etc etc

Levi Morgan–  Thanks guys and good night

rdraper_3–  Thanks Levi

Ohio Mossy Oak–  Speed limit !! YES! I love it

archerdad–  thanks for your time levi

Christopher67–  Thanks Levi

AdvanTimberLou–  Thanks again Levi and all the shooter of the year titles won’t mean a thing when you become the title of dad! Enjoy every moment of it! God Bless you and Samantha!

ferretboy–  Another class act, I have really enjoyed the last two featured chats

 

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Published by admin on 21 May 2012

PREPARE YOUR HUNT NOW by Ted Nugent

PREPARE YOUR HUNT NOW by Ted Nugent

Once we got the foodplots in, we took down more than forty treestands and goundblinds all across our sacred hunting grounds. Springtime isn’t just about house cleaning, turkey and bear hunting and planting crops, and in my case, greasing up the rock-n-roll machinery for a new year’s full throttle rockout, it is also about maintenance and getting a jumpstart on September even before summer rolls around.
We have found over the last fifty plus years of hardcore hunting, that quality control is always way easier, effective, and much safer than damage control. Even if we didn’t guide hundreds of hunters each season and just managed all our hunting for ourselves, there are some very simple, pragmatic basics that will vastly increase the ease and quality of our upcoming hunts with just a little bit of forethought and adequate elbow grease.
We like to take down all our treestands each spring so we can examine the chains and straps and ratchets to be sure everything is in tip top safe, quiet working order. We have all seen how chains grow into trees and straps deteriorate over time, making for some very dangerous, life threatening conditions that there is simply no excuse for.
Plus, I have to tell you; even the slightest change of location for that old stand will greatly benefit our ambush effectiveness come fall. I have found that by moving even a few short yards, critters are far less likely to nail us, and I crave every minute advantage I can squeeze out of my stand location.
A little lube goes a long way on hinges and nuts and bolts. Also by disconnecting a stand from the tree, the chance of squeaks and game alerting little noises can be eliminated. Do it.
We wipe down our Double Bull Blinds to eliminate any corrosive mildew or mold, then make sure they are bone dry before storing them in a dry, protected area.
Sometimes a little heavy duty needle and thread work will suture up some rips and tears, fortifying our pop-up blinds for a more cozy hide-away.
Where legal, now is the time to put out those mineral licks and supplemental nutritional attractants that will keep the critters coming all summer long.
Primos Swamp Donkey blocks, Red Spot mineral bags and apple and corn flavored salt blocks have worked wonders for our MI and TX properties. My buddies around the country have shared the same glowing reports as well.
Raking small clearings and finding such natural clearings in the woods or along edges are great places to broadcast WildGame Innovations Throw and Grow seed, or a homemade concoction of rye, wheat, oats, clovers and alfalfa blends to enhance game areas during the off season. It is always amazing to watch my little pockets of emerald green deer heaven spots take shape as time goes by.
As much as I crave my hunting time, I must admit that I get nearly the same kick out of doing all these different activities in my hunting areas in between seasons. I always find sheds, the occasional mushroom, leaks, wild asparagus, wild berries and wild scallions while doing this fun outdoor work, making for a great day afield everytime. And the kids and grandkids love every minute of it too.
Don’t wait till the end of summer to scramble, do it as far in advance as possible so it can all be accomplished with no rushing around.
And remember too, that groundblinds and treestands should be set back up a good month or so before opening day so that the critters get acclimated to these foreign objects way in advance. It is also beneficial to do so well in advance so we don’t intrude on our hunting areas any more than necessary too close to opening day.
And don’t forget those scent stations. I discovered long ago that mock scrapes have a very positive effect when kept going all year long. And I have also found that it doesn’t matter what kind of deer scent I use. Doe, buck, estrus, doe in heat, dominant buck, fresh, old, natural or synthetic, by keeping a scent station stinky all year, it seems like every deer in the area just has to stop by for a sniff, a rub and a pee. The consistent familiar scent seems to calm them down and give them confidence that all is well.
The exploding phenomena of trail cameras has been an eye opener to all hunters, and if you got em, use em. I’m not a nut about them, but I do set them up here and there occasionally to see what is going on and it is always fascinating to view the critters that frequent my favorite hunting spots when I’m not there.
Stretch that spirit we all so crave as long as possible. Scouting and familiarizing ourselves with our sacred hunting grounds has always been a big part of the hunting lifestyle for everyone I know, so get out of it all we can to maximize the joys we derive from our wild time. The only thing better than wild time is more wild time.

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Published by admin on 01 May 2012

Ignorance of the Law is No Excuse

by Ted Nugent

Not a day goes by where an American outdoorsman doesn’t confide in me that due to the increasingly complex, illogical hunting and fishing regulations across the nation, that it would not surprise them that they have unintentionally violated a game law at some point in time. Other outdoorsmen routinely express their frustration about regulations that serve no purpose and cannot possibly be explained in terms of wildlife management.

America is increasingly drowning in just such strange, goofy regulations and requirements. As logic crusader John Stossel recently exposed, our federal government releases roughly 80,000 pages of new regulations each year–confusing, ambiguous, weird illogical regulations that serve no meaningful purpose other than to feebly attempt to justify bureaucracies already off the rails. It’s way past bizarre.

The “you don’t need to read it, you just need to sign it” health care bill argued before the Supreme Court was almost 2,000 pages long of extraordinarily complex rules and regulations. Sarcastically, Supreme Court Justice Scalia stated that reading the bill was a violation of the 8th Amendment’s cruel and unusual punishment clause.

Regrettably, state hunting regulations have also been ravaged by the over-regulation beast. In Alaska, the hunting regulation book is 128 pages long. The Alaska trapping regulation is 48 pages.

Alaska is not alone. Numerous other states have seen incredible expansion of their hunting regulations over the past few decades. In Texas, the summary of hunting and fishing regulations is 85 pages. The hunting regulations in California are roughly 140 pages long.

Even with an increasing mountain of often confusing and complex hunting and fishing regulations to abide by, sportsmen have a legal and ethical obligation to know and abide by these regulations, no matter how goofy they may be. I have said this for decades and will continue to do so as we fight to make them sensible.

I have hunted in Alaska for almost 40 years. It is a spectacular, beautiful place that offers incredible big and small game hunting cherished by sporters from around the globe.

In 2009, I returned again with my sons to Alaska to hunt black bear. What I was unaware of is that the specific region where I hunted had a new and unprecedented requirement that a bear hunting tag was considered to be “filled” even with a non-lethal hit on the animal. For sixty years, every “tag” regulation in every state and Canadian province has declared that you tag the animal upon taking possession of the animal.

The first arrow I shot on that hunt was obviously a non-lethal shot where the arrow literally glanced off the animal’s rib, as seen clearly on stop action video. The bear leapt, stopped, looked around, and slowly ambled off, confused but unhurt by the disruption. After diligent effort by my son and me, we were convinced that this bear was alive and well. We then continued our hunt and ultimately killed a beautiful black bear.

I filmed the entire hunt including the first non-lethal arrow and put it on my television program Spirit of the Wild on Outdoor Channel for tens of millions of viewers to witness. Airing the hunt on television proves beyond all doubt that I had no willful intention to violate any hunting regulation.

Was I negligent in not knowing the Alaska bear hunting rule for the specific region I hunted that year? Absolutely. For my negligence, I have been charged with a violation and I pled guilty. To the best of my knowledge, I am the only person ever charged with violating this new, unheard of law. Lifetime AK hunters, guides, outfitters, even the resident judge at my hearing were unaware of such an unprecedented regulation.

While I disagree with Alaska’s requirement that a tag is considered to be “filled” even on a non-lethal hit, that was the requirement at the time of my hunt. Had I known of that requirement, I would not have hunted that region because I fundamentally disagree with it, and I certainly would not have hunted another bear.

I have promoted the grand, honorable hunting lifestyle all of my life and will continue to do so. Hunting, fishing and trapping are the epitome of true conservation.

What I also pledge to American outdoorsmen is to work to repeal onerous, unscientific, counterproductive rules and regulations that make no sense such as the seven states where hunting is banned on Sunday, making 50% of the season illegal for the average hunting families in those states. Idiotic laws such as these are a hindrance to real conservation and the critical need for recruiting new hunters. Such arbitrary laws serve no scientific purpose that benefits the management of wildlife value whatsoever.

The outdoor lifestyle cannot be preserved for future generations of sportsmen by constructing such a labyrinth of confusing, unscientific and oftentimes counterproductive regulations and rules. Reversing this trend is my focus.

While I have never intentionally violated a hunting regulation, ignorance of the law is no excuse, and I am truly sorry, and have paid dearly. There is even less of an excuse for ignorant laws.

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Published by archerchick on 13 Apr 2012

Erv Plotz Hard to Keep this Bowhunter Down on The Farm by Jay Strangis

Erv Plotz Hard to Keep this Bowhunter Down on The Farm by Jay Strangis
Bowhunting World April 1990
Erv Plotz says he’s had his hunts and he’s settling down. No more playing tag with grizzly bears. No more chasing ghosts in the desert. No more freezing toes with Eskimos or fistfights in frontier lodges. No. Erv Plotz is fifty years old and he’s giving up the wild life. And why not? Not every world-class bow-hunter is able to retire to the peace of a Minnesota farm when he’s given up the chase. Just because that farm is home — always has been. It`s where he plans to live quietly the rest of his days, he says. And if anyone believes that, they also must believe muskox can fly.
An unlikely combination of farmer-trophy hunter, Plotz  has bowhunted on two continents, taken countless big game animals, placed nine trophies in the Pope and Young record book and notched several bow hunting firsts. People like Erv Plotz don’t just fade away. Try as he might to act reserved, the man still has  an uncontrolled “let’s go hunting”  look in his eye. A gleam that he’s no doubt carried throughout his 36 years as a bow-hunter, and one that’s not likely to dim. He probably displayed that gleam at age 14, while making his first bow.
Denied any use of guns, the farm boy decided he’d do like Native American Indians. The lemonwood limbs he fashioned were crude, as were the arrows he carved from dowels, with chicken feathers for fletching. But by the time he reached ninth grade, he had bow-killed his first deer. The man with a passion for bow-hunting and adventure has bow-killed 46 whitetails since.
Throughout Plotz’ life, others have seemed to identify his adventurous spirit, and the connection has resulted in some memorable experiences. When he joined the military in the l950s, he was sent to Europe. Of course, his bow accompanied him and his target shooting time actually increased. Plotz shot every day, and the longbow became a trademark of the young man. Native Europeans witnessing his skill and hearing of his passion for hunting, couldn’t resist inviting him into the field.
One such invitation came in France, where Plotz earned honors as the first modern bowhunter in Europe to kill a wild boar. He also arrowed a roe deer. Good fortune never has been in short supply for Plotz. An Austrian man whose family survived on American
C-rations during World War II met Plotz and his commanding sergeant, insisting that he take the two on a chamois hunt as a token of his gratitude. They accepted, and Plotz took a 13-year-old chamois ram in a hunt amidst the Austrian peaks. Today such a hunt is comparable to that for North America’s desert bighorn sheep, accessible only to the very lucky, or the very rich.
License To Brag
At home in the sleepy town of Clements, Minnesota, Erv Plotz sits at a dining room table, and directs his eyes past the buildings that house his hogs, across the sweeping soy-bean fields that line the horizon. He grew up in that direction, just two miles away, and like an old buck, he`s spent his life in the same territory, with an occasional foray beyond. Behind Plotz, on the other side of the farmyard, is a grassy area he uses to practice archery. He’s fired many arrows over that ground, most with a bare bow, the way his childhood idol, Howard Hill, had.
Only in the last two years has he shot with a compound bow. As a matter of fact, of the 14 bow-killed animals in Plotz’ trophy room, only his pronghorn antelope was taken using sights. Plotz still likes to handle the bow he used for many years, a 102—pound longbow made for him by Martin Archery. He’s also shot recurve and longbows by Bear Archery and Paul Bunyan Archery, but the Martin bow is a part of Plotz’ most memorable adventures. In fact, the bow itself, combined with Plotz’ ego, earned hunts in some very strange ways. On a hunt for stone sheep in British Columbia, Plotz first turned the bow to his advantage, even though his sheep hunt was a rifle kill.
Outfitter Frank Cook, Plotz` host and one of the most notable guides of the region. took a look at the longbow Plotz carried with him and scoffed at its 102-pound draw weight and slender design. Cook called the bow “a stick” and offered to wager that his son who would arrive in a few days could break the bow. Never one to avoid a good argument. Plotz accepted, but changed the terms of the wager. All Cook’s son had to do was pull the bow to win. At stake was the cost of a moose hunt. Plotz shot his stone sheep on the eighth day of the hunt. He was elated, but that soon turned to a case of nerves after Cook`s son arrived. The boy weighed more than 250 pounds and was as strong as an ox. The moment of truth had arrived. The bow looked like a toothpick in the hands of the overgrown youth. But as he prepared to draw he made one mistake. Instead of raising his elbow to draw the bow, he held the joint against his body and tried to draw from the hip, without raising the bow at all.
After the second attempt Plotz said he knew the moose hunt was his. The boy tired so much in the first two tries there was no way he would succeed if he pulled all day. Only a few years later, another run-in with a critic of Plotz’ bow would lead to a hunt for a trophy mountain lion. The “doubting Thomas” this time turned out to be a Canadian government cat hunter from the Kettle River area of British Columbia. Plotz met the man in a bar and had to listen to him cast insults at the bow’s ability to still a lion. Plotz argued with the man and invited him to “bring on the cat.”
The next day Plotz found himself waist deep in snow following a bunch of rough and ready cat hounds. He reached the treed lion first, but as agreed, had to wait for the government hunter and his pals to arrive to witness the shot. The cougar turned out to be the largest cat taken in Canada up to that time, scoring 14 11/16 P&Y points, weighing 147 pounds and measuring 92.5 inches from nose to tail.
Getting Physical
Plotz and his wife, Donna, have five children. Erv Plotz is especially proud of his sons. He says the boys are tough, and it`s obvious that’s important to him. Erv Plotz is a pretty tough customer him-self. At 50, he’s in better shape than many people half his age. Hard work has kept him that way. When the farm economy slumped. Plotz started a part-time hardwood logging business, a job which nearly cost him his life last year.
Felling huge ash trees in a boggy area with one of his sons, Plotz was struck by a misguided tree. The trunk pinned his leg against the ground, breaking it, and as the angered logger thrashed to pull himself free, he broke his arm against another tree.
One might say Erv Plotz is the physical sort. He also makes friends in strange ways. In a lodge at God’s Lake, Northwest Territories. Plotz happened to mix words with a stranger, another U.S. citizen. The two finished their debate with fisticuffs, but parted company  peacefully. So much so that months later Plotz got a call from another man inviting him on a Canadian fishing trip, and eventually their friendship led them to plan an Alaskan sheep hunt.
Plotz response:    ” When you go hunting you really meet super guys. I think hunters are a very elite group, the best people, especially bowhunters.”
Bringing ’em Back
Erv and Donna Plotz’ traditional attractive farmhouse looks like many other Mid-western country homes – until one gets inside. Past the friendly kitchen and through a warm dining room a menagerie of critters wait to greet the visitor. More than a trophy room, the Plotz’ living room resembles a natural history museum.
A full mounted grizzly bear guards the door to the patio, closely attended bythe full mount of Plotz’ British Columbia lion. On other walls, whitetail, caribou, pronghorn, mountain goat and sheep heads keep watch, while a full-mounted desert bighorn sheep perches on a corner rockpile, replete with a barrell cactus.
Perhaps the strangest creature of all, and certainlythe only one ever to grace the town of Clements, dominates the room: A full-mounted muskox. The muskox holds special significance for Plotz.
It is , he says, the first muskox ever killed by a white man in the Northwest Territories of Canada. It also ranked second in the world, at one time, among Pope and Young records. Plotz got a tip about the special muskox hunt from Jack Atcheson, a taxidermist in Butte Montana.
In February 1980, Plotz found himself accompanied by three rifle hunters who also held permits, two game wardens and seven Eskimos on a wild trip across the frozen tundra on 12-foot wooden sleds pulled by snow-mobile, with only snow drifts to guide them. The natives don’t use compasses, Plotz notes, finding their way by observing the prevailing winds’ imprint on the drifts.
That night, among a village of Eskimos, Plotz` and his bow attracted considerable atention. The natives were fascinated by the idea of a man who might kill a muskox with an arrow. The flattery couldn’t stem P1otz’ worries. He wasn`t sure what would happen when he loaded-up the 102-pound bow at 38 degrees below zero. The next day he got his answer.
Travelling with a native guide, Plotz and the man spotted a dark figure alone on the sea of white. Muskox! They circled for an upwind stalk after identifying the animal as what looked to be a large. bedded bull. They got within yards of the beast and the guide told Plotz to shoot as soon as the animal gained its feet. But at a temperature of almost 40 below, even the guides hollering couldn’t bring the animal from its bed.
When it finally arose, Plotz killed the 103 2/8 trophy. Only one other hunter succeeded in killing a muskox on that hunt, that with a rifle. Plotz` ever-changing luck took a sudden turn when he developed food poisoning from the native cuisine. He left camp only to be detained later by customs officials at Edmonton. Alberta, who confiscated his trophy and gear. Seems they hadn’t heard a rare muskox hunt had been established. It took Plotz more  than a day to resolve the situation.
Versatile Hunter
Erv Plotz loves to bowhunt. But over the years he’s also developed skills as a rifle hunter. One of the accomplishments that brings him the most pride is the completion of a Grand Slam for sheep in just three and one-half years. To complete the Grand Slam, Plotz needed 1 desert bighorn. In a wild piece of luck, he was one of six hunters drawn to hunt the trophy   animals in Arizona, and he hoped that his fourth sheep species would be the first he would take with a bow.
Plotz prepared for the hunt for four months, running over 12 miles each day on the dusty roads surrounding Clements, contacting  any  person who might help narrow down locations for a trophy desert bighorn,   practicing with his bow. By the time the December hunt came along, he was ready. Plotz learned that an Arizona game warden knew the general location of a ram with world record potential.
The warden had photographed the sheep in the Mount Wilson area. Upon seeing the photo, Plotz became obsessed. Interested in the novelty of bowhunting desert sheep, a crowd organized to assist Plotz in his pursuit. The game warden with the photograph took two weeks vacation to attend the hunt. The president of the Bighom Sheep Society would serve as guide and a flock of outfitters would come along to assist.
It was a big sheep camp to chase just one ram, but this was big territory. According to the game warden, the 2,000 square miles they could hunt held just 12 legal rams. The party never did find the once-photo- graphed monster sheep, but did manage to locate a very large ram which Plotz, bow in hand, stalked unsuccessfully four times before the animal finally left the territory.
Days later, when they finally spotted another good ram, Plotz knew the time had come to put away the bow and take out the rifle. His companions were furious. They had come all this way to see the sheep bow-killed. Plotz resisted the pressure. His permit allowed him to take the ram with a rifle, and he was through risking a rare Grand Slam just to appease his ego and the egos of his companions. He might never have this chance again if he lived 10 lifetimes. The next day, he carried the entire sheep, gutted, out on his back — Erv Plotz style.
Wh0’s Stalking Whom
The moose hunt Erv Plotz won years earlier never did produce an animal for him. A world-record class bull had been spotted, but between tangled country and overly aggressive young guides, Plotz’ yearning for a record book moose continued to be only that, a yearning. Seventeen days of brush-battling scratches and frozen toes sent him home only hungrier.
He returned to the northwest several years later. this time Alaska. with hopes of hanging that moose and a grizzly bear. Bowhunting the Christmas Creek area near Nome, Plotz sighted many grizzlies, and one morning saw a path to a stalk. The bear was out in the muskeg, a spongy area where travel was slow, but the low brush offered a chance for an open shot. After sneaking within range, he let go an arrow that zipped low, parting the belly hairs of the giant bruin. Startled, the bear began looking for its adversary, advancing in a slow, circling stalk of its own.
Plotz was unnerved. He managed to escape, but vowed not to put himself in such a spot again. Several days later he bagged a grizzly with his rifle. In the same camp, several hunters returned one day to report seeing a large bull moose on a small lake a short plane flight away. Plotz and the bush pilot took off immediately, knowing if they could spot the animal and land, they would have to sit out the r quired waiting period before legally pursuing the bull. Wind and bad weather greeted them as they reached the lake and spotted the bull. The pilot refused to land under the conditions. With no way to estimate the direction of mountain wind currents on the way down, an attempted landing could prove fatal.
Plotz would likely have jumped from the plane if he hadn’t had another idea. Snatching an arrow from his quiver, he tied a long ribbon to the fletching and dropped it over a gravel slide. The arrow planted itself firmly in the escarpment and the ribbon tailed away with the wind. With their windsock in place, the two put down safely on the lake. Plotz arrowed the bull, a 182 2/8 trophy, the next day, but the weather worsened and for three more days the hunter and pilot remained trapped with the moose carcass under the Alaskan fog.
Closer To Home
In addition to his adventures shooting three P&Y caribou and a P&Y pronghorn antelope with his bow, Erv Plotz takes great pride in the hunting he grew up with near home. Redwood County, Minnesota, is whitetail deer country — farmland, that holds more crop than anything else —where fence-lines mean cover and tiny sloughs hold giant bucks. Several miles away is the lush, forested Minnesota River valley. But Plotz says the bucks prefer the sparse upland habitat most of the year. He might know. Plotz’ many whitetail bow-kills include three P&Y qualifying bucks, with the best two of the three listed in the record book. Vacant groves, creeks and other islands of habitat hold the biggest deer in Redwood County, by Plotz’ estimation. The bucks may like to visit the vast river bottoms on occa- sion, but they don’t like to stay there, he says. He prefers to stalk the deer when he can, or take a ground blind where line fences meet small sloughs.
Last year he spotted what he called a “super buck,” but was unable to bowhunt following his logging accident. The gleam returns to the wild man ’s eye — he ’s checked with every meat locker in the county — the buck wasn’t taken before the season came to a close.
Always Something More
Cutting through the reserved exterior of the new Erv Plotz isn’t difficult, just mention elk or carp, two critters that light him up like a firecracker. For seven years Plotz has been chasing bull elk on an acquaintance’s 10,000-acre spread in Montana, and for seven years he has failed to score. Of course, he doesn’t want to just kill any elk any way. He wants a six by six or better, and he’s going to kill it with a bow.
He’s already practicing with one of his sons for the fall trip, and advising the boy that if he can’t hit the vitals at 60 yards, don’t bother coming to hunt. The area Plotz hunts is wide open country, with lots of bulls and very little cover.
Plotz now shoots an Oneida Screaming Eagle compound, something he picked up a couple of years ago, the same time he first began using sights. He says it just seemed like the time to start catching up with the advantages most other bowhunters enjoyed in speed and range. The feeling is enforced by his experiences watch- ing bull elk on the outside of his bow range.
Elk and a funny looking fish have little in common, except to Plotz. He`s been bowfishing carp for years in the springtime, and gets that crazy look when the subject arises. He wants a big carp as much as that big bull elk. As a matter of fact, he’s planning to shoot a new state record carp to add to the 40 and 42- pound fish he’s already harvested, and he says he knows where the big carp lives.
Seated at his dining room table under a mounted 40 pound carp, Plotz seems almost relaxed as he summarizes his career. “The farming hasn’t been as good as the hunting,” he quips. And he speaks of his 50 years as if it’s a lifetime come to an end —all the good luck and bad luck, close calls and the many people he’s met over the years. Suddenly, he perks up. Seems there’s this giant muskie waiting for him up at Lake of the Woods, Ontario, and he’s just got to get up there as soon as possible and catch that fish. The gleam is back.
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Published by fasst on 27 Mar 2012

Jesse Broadwater Chat Transcript!!!

First off, thanks to Jesse Broadwater, Greg Poole and Goldtip for making this chat happen! We had a great time and Jesse has a tremendous amount of knowledge to share!

Thanks to JHENS for saving all of the logs to build this transcript and to all other moderators that made it in to lend a hand!

    [B]Jesse Broadwater Featured Chat[/B]

JHENS87 – Jesse, what made you switch from the shoot through system at Lancaster to the arc-tec cable slide system for Vegas?

Jesse Broadwater- ok, I’ll go with the first question I see….. regarding the move from the shoot thru to the arc tec rod…

Jesse Broadwater- I like the idea of reducing torque, no matter what kind of torque… I feel the bow can be a line, and responds better to any tuning adjustments, and also tends to hold better for me…….

Jesse Broadwater- but using a whole shoot thru cable system on a bow such as a Hoyt, requires some other changes sometimes, and other modifications, to make it work right… it can be a lot of work to get it right…. and not everybody wants to do that, or knows what to do….

Jesse Broadwater-  so I found the arc tec rods in France this year at Nimes, and brought it home, and tried it…. it was just so much easier, and cleaner, and also, anybody can use them, with ease… and you get the same effect, as the shoot thru…

Jesse Broadwater- tfdo, where’s your question?

jason t -I would like to know what your scope set-up is for the orange spots at the marked yardage championship in Redding. Whether you prefer a circle, fiberoptic, or dot..? Thanks…

Jesse Broadwater- other question up there on scope set up

Jesse Broadwater- I use a CR scope, and for Redding and field, I use the frosted lens….

Jesse Broadwater- been using the 5 power feather vision lens, with homemade frosting paper…. no clarifier

EASTON94 – there you go Jesse answer that one bud!

Hopperton -I would like to know what v-bar set-up you start with when starting from scratch on a new bow? Is it a lot of weight and then remove till it feels right or little weight and add it on as you go

Hopperton -What determines it?

XXX_Shooter -Hey Jesse…. Just wanted to say hi… Christopher Perkins here bud ttyl…

EASTON94 -bowmadness….give us a mad freakdaddy question!!

Jesse Broadwater. -hi Chris!

jason t  -Thank you

Hamdog -I hold a lot steadier with more weight on my bow but my bow arm really gets tired after about 6 ends I then the sight picture is not so steady. I would assume that this is because I do not have enough holding weight. Is there a general rule of thumb you use to figure out the amount of holding weight vs. bow mass weight?

Jesse Broadwater – here’s my deal with holding weight…. and mass weight… I try to use as much as I can, without it biting me in the butt…. what that means is, I want to have enough energy, and strength, to complete my round, whatever it may be, and not getting tired at the end, and loosing points at end of round….

Jesse Broadwater – here is what I found…. I feel the vantage elite is calmer to aim, when the limbs are parallel to the ground, at full draw….. factory specs has the limbs pretty parallel, but not quite flat at full draw, for my set up anyhow, with my size cams and all….

Jesse Broadwater — ok, holding weight, sorry… lemme look

Jesse Broadwater-  but yea, there is a link between holding weight and mass weight also…. it all has to work together in harmony, for things to be just right….. For what you’re shooting, that’s the kicker. Don’t be afraid to change your stabilizer setup, for diff types of shooting, to get the most efficiency out of you, and your setup, for what you’re shooting

Jesse Broadwater-  and remember, what works in practice, may not, when under pressure, so take away all that you can from a tournament, the next time, and when you go to make a change in practice, remember what it felt like in the tournament scene…. since that’s probably what you are practicing for…

Jesse Broadwater- that’s a general rule of thumb for me. But it fluctuates for me, and that’s why u see me playing with weights a good bit, sometimes all throughout the round….

Bowmaddness- Hi Jesse, I was wondering what is a good 3d arrow you recommend from Gold Tip?

Jesse Broadwater- 3d arrow from gold tip….. I would say the 22 series is a real good all-around arrow, 30x even triple x… really depend on the balance between distance, wind, and how much line catching you think you need…

Jesse Broadwater- I used the 22 series for the k 50 I shot not long ago, and it worked great… I feel I coulda got away with a xxx also though, and grabbed a few extra points, cause they both shoot equally well, if you tune your bow for them, and there wasn’t much wind, it was pretty sheltered ranges..

Jesse Broadwater- ok, what was next question?

edgerat –  Jesse, how do you go about setting up your string/cables as it relates to ATA and BH on a new bow? Your VE+ looks to have a pretty short ATA. Do you determine that by shooting the bow and getting the hold where you want it? How did you come to that determination, trial and error or, did someone put you on that idea in the beginning?

Jesse Broadwater- ok, string specs.. a to a specs…

Jesse Broadwater –  here is what i found…. i feel the vantage elite is calmer to aim, when the limbs are parallel to the ground, at full draw….. factory specs has the limbs pretty parallel, but not quite flat at full draw, for my set up anyhow, with my size cams and all….

edgerat – Thanks Jesse!

r49740  – ha-ha. Sorry For a draw length need in the middle of cam sizes(spirals), like a 29.25&quot;… would you find it more beneficial to go to 29” and make longer string/shorter cables, or go to 29.5 and do the opposite? With that, can you give a quick idea of what each may feel like(meaning better valley feel, harder wall, one aims higher/lower than the other, etc.)? And to round out the previous string question, which of those two gets your limbs to be more parallel to the ground as you like them? Thanks greatly.

Jesse Broadwater- ok, draw length and cam size with spirals….. I always like to go to the shorter cam size and long string it a lil… gives you a lil more valley…

Mike@R100 – PARTNER….. When you are on your last few ends of and spot tournament AND YOU ARE STILL CLEAN what goes through your head?!? Tonight I shot another 60X but gets sloppy towards then end… I’m not nervous until my last arrow…

bigGP – good question

Jesse Broadwater- what do I think on last few ends of a clean round…… well, you know what the answer should be right?? it should be the same thing, that got you to where you are…. the thing is, you need to just not think about the ending, and enjoy the moments that you are in, until the score cards all filled up, and there are no more spaces to be filled, and someone says “that’s it, we are done”…..

Daniel Boone – Jesse have you shot the GT new Fita arrow and will that be your arrow for field this year

Hamdog –  Thank you Jesse.

flatline_shoote – When you are practicing for a Vegas shoot how many arrows do you shoot in practice to make sure you don’t get tired during the tournament. I have been a 3 D shooter and now branching into the spots but I start to lose it on the last 15 or so arrows. Also what do you use as an aiming dot or fiber when shooting Vegas 3 spots

Mike@R100 – THANKS HOMIE, ITS HARD WHEN THEY SAY (THIS IS YOU12TH AND FINAL END) IM LIKE WWWWAAHHHHHHH

Jesse Broadwater- I apologize if I miss someone, just yell at me… I’m trying to go in order…

bonecollector56 – Is there such a thing as too stiff of an arrow for target shooting? Because wouldn’t you want the least movement (flex) in the arrow as possible when the only thing you are shooting is field tips?

Jesse Broadwater- I think the ultra-light, or pro hunters, are an awesome arrow, for a blend of speed, and good dia for outdoor….

Jesse Broadwater-  the thing is, I’ve shot all the different arrows from gold tip now, and it’s pretty much as easy as picking the weight, and diameter you think is best for what you’re going to be shooting, and go from there….

bigGP – Not sure who to ask anymore but I think if Jesse could talk about how important strings and cables are to performance and consistency that would be some good info?

jman_23 – what do you use for setting your 2nd and 3rd axis?

fasst – Folks, please do not post a question unless we call your name

Jesse Broadwater- I use the Hamskea leveler for everything… it works awesome, and is easy to use

NEVADAPRO – That’s OK!! I’ve learned to live with it!!LOL!!

Jesse Broadwater- and it works too…. ha-ha!

NEVADAPRO-  Gotta love the Hamskea!!!

ferretboy – Jesse: a buddy of yours makes a shoot thru system, I was very interested in getting one for the alpha elite, would that or the arc tilt be better, and congrats on your recent win, great shooting

ferretboy – mike has already given me a price and would like me to be the guinea pig on the alpha shoot through

jman_23 – ok, do you put your bow in a vise or set it on a table to check everything?

Jesse Broadwater- stiff arrow question up there somewhere I saw… I think if you get the arrow coming out of the bow straight, it doesn’t matter if the arrow flexes of not… and use the correct amount of guidance on back, and point weight to tune for the forgiveness factor..

JHENS87 – 1 question at a time please. Gonna make Jesse’s fingers hurt lol

bigGP – He is a delicate flower

ferretboy –   hahaha, a delicate flower, priceless, when he’s not looking at Louisville I’m putting that sticker on his bowcase

jman_23 –   thanks for everything Jesse!!!

Jesse Broadwater – and I basically just hold level on limb pockets, match the elevation bar to it, then a vise is nice to set the second axis, just clamp hamskea onto elevation bar, and match level in scope to it, while bow is pointed parallel to ground….. set that. Then put alignment pin in hamskea, leave attached to elevation bar, draw bow, and line it up on a plumb string, up and down… make adjustments

fasst – We’ve only got Jesse for a few more minutes y’all, PM me if you have a question and I will call your name in order until time runs out

Jesse Broadwater- I’m fine for a bit,, just lemme have um… don’t wanna miss anybody…

T.FDO – Jesse…How should one go about selecting Brand/Weight/and Length when they have no access to different stabilizers to try? Is there a Formula you use to figure your length/weight for you stabilizers? (This would be for Bowhunter class and just hunting in general) Also…Do you prefer vanes or feathers? Which one? And what length guides the arrow best?

Jesse Broadwater- ok, stabilizer, and vanes/feathers….

ferretboy – Jesse: a buddy of yours makes a shoot thru system, I was very interested in getting one for the alpha elite, would that or the arc tilt be better, and congrats on your recent win, great shooting

fasst – nevada, then montigre, then outback then custard then conquest….whew! We will call yall in that order….

Jesse Broadwater – for hunting, as with target, I think it depends on what you’re doing…. and how much u can handle and all…. but I can’t say there is any given formula to go by when selecting one…. I think the best thing to do here is, find a place/dealer/buddy, that can let you try diff configurations on your bow, and get it in the ball park, then just buy some extra weights, to tinker around with, and carry with you, incase u think u need them….

Jesse Broadwater-  but in general, I like to use a 15″ bar out front of my carbon matrix, with about 6-8 oz., and a 12″ back bar, with 10 or so on it…. seems like a lot, but when u get the balance right, it isn’t bad at all, its comfy, and you would be amazed at how much better you will shoot your hunting rig, rather than just a 6″ rubber stabilizer screwed in front, that actually aint doing anything….

Jesse Broadwater – and you will have much more confidence in your shot, and your set up will be a lot more forgiving, when the moment of truth arrives, and that massive 5 point PA buck is in range…. 🙂
ferretboy –  hahahahahaha 5 pt.

bigGP – LMAO nice
T.FDO  – Hahaha…Thanks Jesse!

Jesse Broadwater- just kidding, there are some nice ones here in PA… just never where I hunt!!

fasst – You’re on deck montigre!

montigre – Hi Jesse, and thanks for doing this chat. How do you go about determining the parameters for fine tuning a specific set up (string/cable length, limb deflection, etc) say for field? What is the baseline you work from and steps considered to reach your desired fit? Thanks!

edgerat – good question!

bigGP  – nevada & Mont asked good ones

ferretboy – Jesse is swamped blast big GP with some questions everybody

bigGP – huh? Wrong chat bro! hahahahaha

edgerat –  Greg Poole, how much does your dog eat?

NEVADAPRO – Hi Jesse, what do you feel is the most important part of setting up your bow (for either field or indoor) to allow the best possible hold on the spot? Is it more in the DL and holding weight, or in the stabilizer set-up? Thanks!

Jesse Broadwater- Well, I would say we all have a baseline to go off of, and for me, it’s the minor tweaks here and there that can all add up, and make all the difference….

ferretboy – good question edge

fasst – outback jack, you’re up!

bigGP- 12 cups a day of super good dog food with raw liver and venison burger (1 cup)

edgerat – nice, good call Mr. Poole

outback jack – Jesse have you ever had problems with your bow shoulder wanting to rise on you and if so what was one of the things you did to fix it? Thanks.

bigGP – good question bro!!

outback jack – Thanks one of my major problems

Jesse Broadwater- like drawlength, an 1/8″ shorter, longer…. peep height, sight extension length, scope size/power, aiming reference point in scope, stabilizers, holding weight… all of this….. It all can be optimized, for efficiency, for the round you’re preparing for, it just takes time behind the string, actually practicing what you’re preparing for…. (Wow, did that just make sense)

Jesse Broadwater- practicing what you’re preparing for…. hmmm, yea……

bigGP –  eeeeasy freakshow

montigre –  Thanks!!

Jesse Broadwater- ok, so in field, you got up and down hills, side hills….. terrain…… some wind, some lighting changes… some rain here and there….

edgerat – Greg Poole, have you found a big gain from running a 10 degree down QD on your b-stinger setup?

bigGP – Jesse runs one also. I think he can answer that when its time……….

ferretboy- Hey Greg, what is your opinion on tan slacks and the wearing them at Vegas?

Jesse Broadwater – practice all this stuff, and practice in that weather, to know what your setup does, in those conditions…. unload your quiver on that nasty up or down hill target, and pay attention to what your feeling, and seeing… you see, this sport is all about feel…. so if something doesn’t feel right, you can usually make a change, and the feel will change…. u gotta play to find that comfy spot….

bigGP  – bout time!!! We should have been wearing no denim at Vegas forever….it’s a shooter of the year pro event so the nfaa pro dress code applies. It’s just a start

fasst – GoldCustard, have your question ready for Jesse?

Jesse Broadwater –  ohh no.. not the slacks!!!

ferretboy- hahahahaha, I threw that in to see if you two were paying attention Jesse

Jesse Broadwater- who’s my next one from?

bigGP –  Jesse is in the know zone right now… the freakshow hears and sees all!!! LMAO

bigGP –  about the front shoulder

outback jack – me I think

ferretboy –  hahahahahaha

fasst –  the bow shoulder question, Jesse

fasst-  Jesse have you ever had problems with your bow shoulder wanting to rise on you and if so what was one of the things you did to fix it? Thanks.

ferretboy-  do you know Jesse’s buddy that makes the shoot through system Greg?

bigGP –  who is it?

Jesse Broadwater-  I need to write a book…. I tell my wife that all the time, cause it seems I never get out, all of what I want to get out, when somebody asks a question… cause there are so many variables, and scenarios…. I think if just wrote them all down, and got it all out, I would feel better… lol!! Not saying that may book would be worth two nickels to anybody, but for my own good… just to get the info, from my experiences out, and on paper…

ferretboy –  mike something or other

bigGP  –  I have a shoot thru on my VE+………Jesse made it. LMAO

Jesse Broadwater- you’re talking about mike mathews that makes the shoot thru… hes my friend loclally, and knows his stuff!

Jesse Broadwater-  very technical savvy guy…

bigGP –  wow

bigGP –  LOL

ferretboy –  that is him, he offered to let me guinea pig with the alpha elite but said his machine is down

edgerat-  If Jesse, Gillingham, GRIV, and a few of the others all got together and did something that would be EPIC.

Jesse Broadwater-  ok, 40c and some lint…. Ill do it!!

ferretboy –  just to be fair I was saying that Jesse was seriously undervaluing his book

edgerat –  you push a hard bargain Broadwater but, I will do it.

bigGP  –  shoulder question Jesse

Jesse Broadwater –  shoulder…..

bigGP –  come on ADD boy!

fasst  – lol

ferretboy –  I’m in stitches you guys are a buzz

NEVADAPRO –  I’ll give you $19.99 for the book, but I would like 20 value payments!!!!LOL!!!

bigGP –  Dealing with jesse is like herding cats! Or holding smoke in your hands!

NEVADAPRO  –  Like pushing a boulder with a string?

outback jack –  I got a feeling he is typing up an answer right now:d

edgerat-  Jesse knows, there is no spoon……

ferretboy –  You need to change your moniker to master cat herder Greg

bigGP –  nawwww at least you can find the boulder…..

bigGP –  lmao

NEVADAPRO –  LOL!!!

ferretboy-  and write a book too, the Zen of cat herding

bigGP – Jesse is pissed right now….cuz he is trying an answer to the shoulder question while I bash his face in and he can’t reply!!!!

bigGP – he he hehe he

ferretboy – he’ll give it back full force at nationals GP

outback jack –  Whoa whoa let up on him at least till he answers it lol

JHENS87 –  I’m sure he’s afraid of you ferret lol

bigGP –  probly

ferretboy –  oh, and I drank the koolaid and bought the stingers

bigGP  –  shibby!

JHENS87 –  I’m trying to shoot bstinger. Really trying

fasst –  Send me one of those stingers Dave

montigre –  I have a whole hive of ’em….

ferretboy –  not a chance trav, hell I put one of the sidebars on my element and its working awesome as a front with 6 ounces on there

Jesse Broadwater-  my bow shoulder always has seemed to be a lil higher than most… I dunno why, it just seems to lock in there… but I have done work on lowering it last year, and it lowered some, and still remained comfy… I think it was causing me some low misses here and there…

fasst –  gee thanks Dave

edgerat –  my turn for a question now? It is hard-hitting….

fasst –  go for it edge, then conquest is up

Jesse Broadwater-  mike mathews helped me with this also… he took some pics, and said I wasn’t standing straight

ferretboy –  greg, find out where Jeremy’s stabilizer is, least you can do for him being such a great moderator tonight

edgerat –  Mr. Broadwater, what is like being out-dressed on the line by Greg Poole?

fasst –  ouch, edge!

bigGP –  he is used to it.

ferretboy –  so your posture was keeping your bow shoulder high?

JHENS87 –  I know where my stab is at ferret, waiting to be put together LOL

ferretboy –  wait…wait… let him finish this question

Jesse Broadwater-  said I was leaning back a lil, needed to get my upper body more centered over my hips, and to do this, I shifted a lil more weight over my lead foot, and it seemed to help higher shoulder

fasst –  nice tip Jesse

ferretboy-  nice, that was some valuable info

outback jack –  k thanks will give me something to look at

conquest –  Do you pull hard into the wall or do you shoot off the front of the cam? Do you fletch right or left helical and why?

bigGP –  I got packing to do folks. I am OUT!!! Thanks everyone and good looking out Jesse! See you tomorrow

Jesse Broadwater –  he told me to kind of pretend I’m shooting a lil bit of a downhill target on the set up, and that made total sense to me, and it worked pretty good.. but that’s kind of a major change, even though it doesn’t sound like much, it changes feel a lot, after you have been doing something the same way for so long, like whooping Greg in foot races, and shooting, for him to actually prevail one time, it just wouldn’t seem right you know.. gotta give it some adaptation time… hahahahahahehehehehe!!!

fasst –  Thanks again Greg!

JHENS87 –  have fun building my stab for me GP

ferretboy –  later Greg, putem in the x

Jesse Broadwater –  sweet dreams Greg!…hahaha

ferretboy –  hahahahaha, he won’t beat you unless he takes out your knee caps

Jesse Broadwater-  ( I sure hope he logged out before reading that)

conquest –  my turn?

Jesse Broadwater-  conquest.. yes….

NEVADAPRO –  I told you Jesse would get you back when he was through typing Greg!!LOL!!!

Jesse Broadwater –  I shoot just against wall

bigGP –  ohhhhh foot race?? I don’t race scrubs!…after I already whooped them!..goodnight now!!!

conquest –  how about fletching

Jesse Broadwater –  unless it real windy, then I pull a lil harder

Jesse Broadwater-  and I fletchings I have been going with left off set… gives you better vane to cable clearance with bigger arrows especially…

montigre –  Ooh, gotta be up in 4 hours…Thanks, again Jesse and best of luck to everyone heading out to L’ville!!

Jesse Broadwater-  ok, I can do about two more.. then got lots to do.. Leaving for AZ Cup at about 3 in morning… I will sleep on plane…..

fasst –  Daniel Boone, go for it big guy!!

GoldCustard –  Hi Jesse, I was wondering if there is a recommended procedure for setting the optimal position (front/back) of arrow contact with the freakshow arrowrest? Thanks
.
Daniel Boone –  Jesse have you shot the GT new Fita arrow and will that be your arrow for field this year! Did you enjoy the ASA event in Monroe?

JHENS87 –  good question DB, I’m interested in those new arrows

Jesse Broadwater-  rest question first, than GT…

edgerat –  montigre sure knows how to make an exit.

Jesse Broadwater –  sight bow in…. then draw back, and torque bow, and shoot, if arrow hits the way your stabilizer was pointed when torques, the rest needs to come back…. if it goes opposite, it needs to go forward… really that simple

Jesse Broadwater-  I have not shot or seen new small dia GT fita arrows….

edgerat –  dang, that is a good piece of tuning info!

ferretboy-  that’s the question I had lined up before I got booted. Thanks edge

Daniel Boone – Good info on rest, many always wonder

Jesse Broadwater- I am shooting 500 kinetics now, and they shoot real good…. 120 up front, 2″ aae max vanes on back, and they pound! Weigh about 345….
 
ferretboy – I’m out all, thanks for coming jess, professional as always. Congrats on Vegas and best of luck at Louisville and abroad. Dave Henderson

fasst – Folks, let’s give Jesse, Greg and Goldtip a HUGE thank you! We got off to a rocky start but ended up with some really good questions and answers. Jeremy will have a transcript build to post in the General Forums sometime tomorrow!

Daniel Boone – Thanks Jesse good luck in Arizona

Edgerat- THANKS JESSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

bigredhunter00 – lol

JHENS87 – thanks again Jesse

Jesse Broadwater- And I enjoyed Monroe! I wanna do another, I know what to do know, and could do a lot better, it was fun..

Jesse Broadwater- thanks you guys! And you’re all welcome!

JHENS87 – you let us know when you want to do one

Jesse Broadwater – wish we had more time… let’s do it again!

ferretboy – yeah

fasst – sure thing Jesse!

Jesse Broadwater- see you all later!!

 

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