Archive for the 'Pro Shooters' Category

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Published by admin on 24 Jun 2010

Outdoors Magazine Online Poll

Ted Nugent Tied With Benoit BrothersRight-click here to download pictures. To help protect your privacy, Outlook prevented automatic download of this picture from the Internet.

With a week remaining in Outdoors Magazine’s online poll Ted Nugent and the Benoit Brothers are running neck and neck when it comes to the public selecting their favorite hunting personality. Each has received a 23% rating.

Rounding out the Top-10 in the poll are Michael Waddell (13%), Charles Alsheimer (9%), Hal Blood (8%), Larry Weishuhn (8%), Ralph & Vicki Cianciarulo (7%), Tiffany Lakosky (7%), Bill Jordan, Dan Schmidt, and the Drury Brothers are all tied for 10th place with 5%.

Other names mentioned in the polls who have received less than 5% are: R.G. Bernier, Bob Foulkrod, Tom Miranda, Lee Lakosky, Neil Dougherty, Cindy Garrison, Toxey Haas, Cameron Hanes, Haley Heath, Bob Humphrey, Chris Bracket, Stan Potts & Dick Scorzafava.

“We are absolutely fascinated by the poll results so far,” said James Austin, the president of Elk Publishing. “Some of the names we though would surely be leading have received less than 5%, while others have done much better than anticipated. It is funny to see things like how Tiffany is blowing away Lee in the vote,” he said.

The second half of the poll asks five questions directed at the way television portrays hunting. One of these questions is, “Do you buy hunting products that your favorite personality promotes?”  Only 22% of the audience answered in a favorable way, while 64% said, “Occasionally, it is not one of my primary considerations.” A surprising 14% answered “Never. Celebrity endorsement erode the product’s credibility.”

“Some of the comments are also spectacular,” said Austin. “I can’t wait to print them in the next issue of Outdoors Magazine. They really support what we have suspected, that the American public wants to see real situations … only many of our readers have put it in a much more ‘colorful’ way.”

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Published by The Super Sauce on 06 May 2010

Northeast Archery Deer & Predator Extravanza

Middlefield, Ohio

June 12, 2010

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Published by The Super Sauce on 06 May 2010

Northeast Archery Deer & Preditor Extravaganza

Guiness World Record Holder

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Published by D.A.Vaughan on 29 Mar 2010

Mi ASA Outdoor Shoot

There will be a Mi ASA Outdoor Shoot on 04-17-10 /04-18-10  

Shotgun Starts at 9:00 am /1:30 pm Both days

30  3D targets

Rolls and Coffee and Lunch available

Chief Okemos Sportsman’s Club

4667 N Gunnell Rd (note some google maps miss spell this road a gannell)

Dimondale,Mi. 48821

Contact-Dave Walter 517 646 0701

e-mail cosc10rings@yahoo.com

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Published by admin on 22 Mar 2010

Aspirin Busting at the Famous Iowa Deer Classic

Aspirin Busting at the Famous Iowa Deer Classic

(Des Moines, Iowa) The Iowa Deer Classic is one of the country’s premier hunting shows.   This event is held the first weekend of March and is always a popular show for TV hunting celebrities, well known seminar speakers, and features booths with everything the sportsman needs.  You can see trophy whitetail bucks and talk to expert taxidermists, deer hunters, and outfitters.  There are also manufacturers at this event.
 
There were three big seminar rooms and there was a variety of speakers each day.  The stage set up at this event was first class.  Each show started with Ted Nugent’s “My Bow and Arrow” song playing on the PA system. I like Ted’s “Fred Bear” song but his “Bow and Arrow” song is perfect to play before each performance.  We had good sized crowds at each show even though Saturday’s 2 shows  were scheduled at the exact same time as my friends Nic and T-Bone with the Bone Collector Crew.  My assistant Garrett did a super job tossing targets for me.  At the end of the shows I did a Question & Answer session which the audiences seemed to enjoy. 
 
The Bone Collector crew is a great buch of guys and my parents enjoyed having the gang in bear camp last Spring.  Nic and T-Bone told me Michael Waddell was at the Dixie Deer Classic in Raleigh, NC while they were in Iowa for this event. 
 
I also ran into Myles Keller,  Pat Reeves and Nicole Jones, and several other well known hunting personalities.  I also got to visit with Tom Hoffman, a well known bowhunter who took the SuperSlam with his bow.  Tom had been the guest speaker at a bowhunter banquet and stopped by the show to look around.

Antler Dog’s Roger Sigler and I had dinner one evening.  Roger’s seminars are always popular and he was there Friday night.  Roger tells his audience how to train their dogs to find shed antlers.   These are entertaining seminars and I always enjoy seeing Roger.
 
The new Hoyt Formula RX bows are shooting great!   The audiences seem to like the six arrow shot, the two balloon shot, and the smaller balloons.  During Sunday’s performance I nailed the baby aspirin the second shot and then it was time to wave so long and head for home and get ready for the next show.  The Iowa Deer Classic is a legendary show and is a great time.  I look forward to getting back to Des Moines and this show.  Special thanks to John,  Garrett, and the rest of his family & staff for the great time.

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Published by admin on 09 Mar 2010

Bow & Arrow Razzle Dazzle

Bow & Arrow Razzle Dazzle at the

Wisconsin Deer Classic & Outdoor Expo

On February 26-28, 2010 I made a return trip to the Wisconsin Deer Classic and Hunting Expo at Shopko Hall in Greenbay, Wisconsin. The show is located across the street from the famous Greenbay Packer’s Lambeau Field. The show features quality displays of hunting gear, guides and outfitters. The display of trophy whitetail deer is impressive and the state of Wisconsin just may be a best kept secret for good whitetail. You hear a lot about Illinois, Iowa and Texas but Wisconsin is producing some quality bucks too.

This was a fun show and my friends Bill & Sandy Weisner were there which always means we’ll joke around and share some good dinners. Their “Bear Sense” business seems to be doing really well and Bill’s Bear Hunting seminars are popular up in the Northern states. He has been a respected speaker on bear hunting for many, many years.

Dan Laubenstein has been doing this show for 27 years and it is a Wisconsin tradition. They had several special whitetail on display, including the debut of the new Wisconsin state record bow kill and some additional trophy bucks. These big monster bucks got a lot of attention from attendees.

Dan’s son Jim tossed targets for me and he did a fine job. We also had a great burger a local eatery near Lambeau field, called Krolls West. I also took time to visit the Greenbay Packer’s pro shop in Lambeau Field and have lunch at Curly’s, a place named in honor of Curly Lambeau, one of the founders of the historic Greenbay Packers football team. They have a beautiful Vince Lombardi statue there in front of the stadium. I imagine this place goes crazy on game day, everywhere you go you see Packers logos.

The Wisconsin Deer Classic and Outdoor Expo is a great event, whether you are an attendee, exhibitor, or speaker. Dan & family treat you well and the show is full of good people who are there to share their love of hunting. I joked with Jim that Lambeau Field had put a curse on me since my bow string messed up in 2005 and my rest broke in 2010. We still managed to do good performances and had good crowds at my shows. I hope to see all of my Greenbay area friends again in a year or two.

Well folks, that’s the latest. Until next time, Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.

((PHOTO is Jim Laubenstein and I))

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Published by admin on 03 Mar 2010

Show time at the 12th Annual St. Louis Deer Classic and Outdoor Expo

Show time at the 12th Annual

St. Louis Deer Classic and Outdoor Expo


 

Starched Wrangler jeans, starched George Strait shirt, polished boots, Rocking A belt buckle & belt, and a cowboy hat and my wardrobe is complete.  It’s almost show time at another “HAVE BOW WILL TRAVEL” appearance.  When you see this gear out you know it’s time for some baby aspirin busting, bow and arrow razzle dazzle!  SHOWTIME.  Let’s get with it.
 
The weekend of February 19-21, 2010 I was in Collinsville, ILL for the 12th annual St. Louis Deer Classic and Outdoor Expo.  The Gateway Expo Center is home to the show and is a great facility for this type of show.  The show started in the St. Louis area and was recently moved into this new building.  There were lines to get in and the show isles seemed packed, so this show seemed pretty popular. 
 
The building had lots of room for the booths, an indoor archery range, seminars, and lots of those big Illinois and Missouri whitetail bucks.  I saw one full mounted buck taken with a bow that scored 209.  It was a great trophy and I’ll bet the owner was proud of it.  Those farm country bucks get really big.
 
Bill & Sandy Weisner were at the show with their new company “Bear Scents”.  This company fits Bill “Bear crazy” Wesiner to a T, he loves bear hunting and continues to do his “bear hunting seminars” across the country.  We usually make time to eat a few meals together while at the show.  I also grabbed lunch with my pal Bob Whitehead from the Outdoor Guide magazine.  Bobby is a great friend and does a super job with Outdoor Guide.  His pal Ray Eye and I did a radio interview last weekend to promote the appearance in Collinsville.  Ray didn’t make the show, he was at the NWTF National Convention in Nashville.  Eye is well respected for his turkey hunting abilities and his successful radio program Eye on the Outdoors.  People like Ray and Bobby deserve a pat on the back for promoting the outdoors via their radio show and magazine.
 
The promoter’s grandson Shane was my sidekick for the shows.  He did a great job tossing targets and was a great assistant.  I appreciate the crowds that came out & the ones that stayed for autographs.  Sunday’s show was our best and probably largest of the weekend.  Afterward the hall was packed with folks waiting for autographs.  That lets me know I am doing my job when we go through a lot of publicity photos in one weekend. 
 
This was my second show with the new Hoyt Formula RX recurve bows.  These bows are awesome and very accurate!  If you haven’t watched the bow tube interview with Hoyt engineer Douglas Denton yet, visit : 
 
http://www.bowtube.com/media/778/AspirinBuster_At_Hoyt/
 
This area is a great area full of archery history.  Earl and Ann Hoyt operated the original Hoyt company near by in Natural Bridge, MO and later Sky Archery.  Several folks told me stories about Earl and Ann during the weekend.  There’s a huge interest in traditional archery in this area.  We also had big crowds at my last appearance there several years ago, I think it was 2004.   I promoted the local Hoyt dealer that had a booth at the show.
 
I want to thank everyone for coming to see my show.  We head to Green bay, Wisconsin next for the WISCONSIN DEER CLASSIC.  The weekend after that I’ll be at the Iowa Deer Classic in Des Moines, Iowa.   The HAVE BOW WILL TRAVEL tour rolls on… seeing is believing, see you at the show!
 
That’s the latest folks, until next time Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank
 
www.frankaddingtonjr.com

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Published by archerchick on 16 Feb 2010

GLASSING PROS – By Joe Bell

GLASSING PROS –By Joe Bell
April 2006
Consider these effective tips and techniques for spotting game out west
April 2006

The outcome was quite typical. There I was with my handheld 10-power glass while my elbows were braced against my knees, intently scoping out the surroundings, while my good buddy Ron was using his 15×56 Swarovski binocular mounted atop an ultra-sturdy Bogen tripod. I was coming up dry while Ron, who was pretty comfortable leaning against his Jeep, was identifying bucks all over the rugged, desert hillside. It became apparently obvious that I was using a poor glassing system, which was certainly limiting my chances of spotting and stalking a buck that day.

No matter what you hunt, to be most effective you must tailor your equipment to the type of hunting you’ll be doing. Out west, first and foremost this means employing clear, high-power optics and various glassing techniques that will enable you to spot game so the hunt can begin.

Personally, I don’t know anyone more gifted at spotting game in wide-open western country thatn some of the hardcore bowhunters and guides who live and do most of their hunting in the Southwest.

Here’s how many of these hunters approach glassing in such country. And due to their success on tough-to-bag critters, such as trophy mule deer, elk, desert bighorn sheet and Coues deer, I know you’ll want to begin employing their tricks and tactics.

Glassing Speed: Good or Bad?
As an outfitter in the Southwest, Chad Smith has one of the best reputations I know of. One of the reasons why he’s so successful with clients is due to his experience and savvy at spotting game amid the vast desert terrain. He’s done it for most of his life -20-plus years – so this guy knows his stuff.

When I quizzed Chad about his glassing techniques he kind of stunned me with some of his advice. It’s not what many so-called experts have been telling us over the years.

“I use 10-power binoculars 90 percent of the time, even in the most expansive country,” Chad told me. “I’m more effective this way, since I can look over a lot of terrain, and in a short amount of time.”

Also, Chad doesn’t use a set pattern when glassing hillsides. He glasses those areas that appear best for holding game and then he moves out to the secondary locations. “I consider myself the world’s fastest glasser,” said Chad. “Some guys set up and just stare at terrain, virtually picking it apart. Personally, I think this technique limits your ability to cover a lot of terrain. That’s why I don’t glass this way. It sounds romantic to say you glassed up a leg, antler or ear of a deer, but nearly most of the time you’re glassing the whole deer,” said Chad, who obviously believes glassing speed can make the difference in success or failure. Of course, this goes against what many say, and that is to pick apart terrain slowly, not sweep past it. But Chad’s technique is well-honed, and what many would consider a “sweep” is a fast but well-orchestrated view of the surroundings.

Chad also routinely mounts his favorite 10×42 binocular (either a Leica or Zeiss) to a Gitzo 1228 LVL tripod that is equipped with a 3130 Bogen fluid head, doing a lot of long-range glassing this way. When at a high vantage point and he has already looked over the area with this 10-power glass, only will he then employ a big binocular to scour the terrain. For the past 10 years he’s used a Doctor 30×80 binocular for such work, which is no longer available. However, at this time, he’s working with the Outdoorsman in Phoenix (800/291-8065; www.outdoorsmans.com), on a prototype binocular that will offer 20-45 magnification with 55mm objective lenses, which he feels will be the ultimate long-range glassing tool.

According to Chad, one of the biggest mistakes he sees novice hunters make is failing to look over a valley or basin with the naked eye first before sitting down to intently glass. Sometimes game can be below you within 100 yards or so, and not a mile away. If you don’t scan terrain first, you could spook or limit our chances of the essence, particularly during the early seasons when the window of time when deer are on the move and more visible is 1 1/2 hours or less.

One big misconception out there is always glassing with the sun at your back. You have to learn to glass with the sun in your face. This allows you to look over terrain that is more shaded and more accommodating for animals to bed and feed in. Also, when it’s hot, says Chad, it’s a good idea to glass the shade all day long because that’s where you’ll find the animals.

Beyond knowing how to glass, you must know when to start your stalk as well. “If a buck isn’t in the right place for a stalk, you’ve got to wait,” said Chad. “We’ve sat on deer from daylight till dark waiting for the right moment to strike. And even then, you might have to try the next day, or the one after that.”

Glass All Day
Jay Scott has been hunting the Arizona mountains and deserts since he was 15 years old. However, he wasn’t very effective early on since he relied more on foot travel to locate game, rather than using good hunting optics to do the work. “I was introduced to hunting by my friend Jason Melde, and he was always a very good glasser,” says Jay. “Eventually, I ended up catching on over the years and began upping my success.”

When glassing, Jay prefers very prominent vantage points. “I feel the more country you can see, the better your chances are of finding the game you’re after.” Some hunters routinely glass from the truck, which Jay feels can be effective in some cases, particularly when you ‘re hunting a new place and you need to cover lots of country quickly. “I have been known to stand on top of my truck in some situations, especially in country that’s flat with no vantage points,” said Jay.

“I really don’t have a particular pattern and quite frankly don’t necessarily fall for the grid system,” said Jay. “I first glass what looks good to me, work the other areas and then do it all over again. If you get too caught up in a glassing grid it may cause you to miss something. For instance, if you are stuck in a grid and a buck walks through a saddle, you may miss the buck. If there are areas that you know will be consistent travel routes you need to be constantly checking back to them and then continue on with your glassing grid. Regardless of your technique, don’t leave any bit of terrain unturned with the binocular.”

While others consider prime time just that –prime time, Jay believes mid-day glassing has a lot of merit. “Me and my hunting partners have found some of best bucks during the middle of the day. You simply can’t quit glassing.”

Jay considers the following as the biggest rookie mistakes: not using a tripod, or using a flimsy cheap one; using low-quality optics; not getting comfortable enough to glass for long periods of time; failing to regularly clean lenses; arriving at key glassing spots too late in the morning. “Also, it is absolutely necessary to bed your quarry and then keep your buddy watching while you make your stalk.” said Jay. “By bedding the animal you usually are guaranteeing yourself 45 minutes to get into shooting position. A buddy who can signal you during the stalk is a deadly advantage.”

Favors Grid Glassing
As a hunting guide, consultant for Swarovski Optik, and native Arizonan, Chris Denham knows more than a thing or two about glassing game in the Southwest. Put more precisely, he knows a lot, and I consider him one of the best I’ve seen.

“Utilizing quality optics has been the most important part of my hunting for 25 years,” said Chris. “I was raised in Douglas and had the good fortune to hunt with Marvin and Warner Glenn. The Glenn family guided for Coues and mule deer using quality binoculars like Zeiss 10x40s and the better Bausch & Lomb models. I quickly learned that my success would be dependant on my ability to find deer before they found me, and quality binoculars gave me the advantage I needed.” “All of my optics are made by Swarovski,” said Chris. “I carry an 8×32 EL around my neck and a 15×56 SLC, and a STS-80 spotting scope in my pack. The EL is very easy to hold with one hand, which I think is beneficial to the bowhunter during the stalk. The 15-power binocular mounted to a tripod allows me to study fine details and find deer and sheep out to three miles, while the spotting scope is generally used to evaluate trophy-quality. When using the binocular I am not always able to determine if that funny-looking spot is a deer or an inanimate object; in a situation like this, the spotting scope will answer the question and allow you to move on or start stalking.”

When chosing a glassing area, Chris sizes up things very methodically. “I pay more attention to the sun than the wind direction,” said Chris. “On a cold morning animals will often move to or stay in a sunny spot, while on warm afternoons they will seek out some shade. Either way, don’t put yourself in a position that requires you to look directly into the sun.”

You must be comfortable when glassing. Here the author's friend Ron Way is using his Jeep as the perfect resting spot.

Like Chad Smith, Chris prefers to initially look over his immediate surroundings without optics. However, once he sits down to glass, he looks over the area systematically, glassing in a grid pattern. “I start at the bottom left corner of the area I want to cover and look at it for 10 to 20 seconds (depending on the species, terrain and vegetation),” said Chris. “After 20 seconds I will move a ‘half frame’ to the right, so I am essentially looking at each field of view twice. In areas that have a lot of concealed terrain or excessive vegetation, I may go through this routine three to four times.”

“Glassing effectively is much like reading a book with fine print; you need to be comfortable and relaxed to be effective. If you are shivering after a long hike, or you are forced to sit on sharp rocks, you will not want to glass for long. Carry a cushion or small chair (especially if the ground is wet) to sit on. I like to carry an extra shirt so that when I get sweaty on a hike I can put on the warm dry shirt when I stop to glass.”

“Talent is a gift you are born with and skill is something that can be obtained through proper training. Glassing is a skill, not a talent,” said Chris. “The first time I glass with a new hunter I always put them in charge of monitoring each deer I see. When trying to keep track of 1 to 10 deer at a time they learn to recognize deer when they can only see a small part of the deer. The more you watch an animal in multiple presentations, the more likely you will be able to recognize that animal in the future. This is glassing ‘practice’.”

One of the chief mistakes rookie glasser make is arriving at vantage points too late in the morning, you must be set up by first light

“When stalking, I like to get within 200 yards with the wind in a safe direction and then study the stalk. You may have a prevailing southwest wind, but there may be a back draft in a small draw or canyon. In the winter (in the Southwest) it is not uncommon for the breezes to change 180 degrees as the frosty morning air reaches its afternoon peak. Pay close attention to what the wind is doing every day, even if you are not on an active stalk. This will improve your decision making when the adrenaline rush of a stalk sets in.” <—<<

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Published by snixon on 26 Jan 2010

3-D shoot

There will be a 3-D shoot the second Sunday of each month starting in February … Cal. start …. traditional shooters may begin any time after 9 … compound shooters may begin any time after 10:30 …. all archers must start the range before 1:30 …..

Located between Harleton, Diana, and Ore City … on highway 726 … between hwy 259 N and the dam on Lake O’ the Pines …. south shore ….

address:

2383 FM 726 W

Diana, Texas 75640

contact: shaine Nixon

world slam archery and outfitters

(903) 399-8450

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Published by admin on 19 Jan 2010

My Method of shooting the bow: by Frank Addington Jr.

My Method of shooting the bow:
The Groscup Method of Instinctive Shooting
Although my father actually started me shooting a bow instinctively at four years old, I have dubbed my method “The Groscup Method” in honor of my friend and mentor the late Rev. Stacy Groscup.  A humble Methodist minister from Morgantown, WV Stacy was a great shot with a bow.  Any bow.  He was the first man to hit an aspirin tablet from mid air with a bow and he was the only archer to ever hit seven pills in a row, that remains a world record.  He did that record shot in the 1980’s in front of national TV. In 2004 he signed the 7th arrow he used for that shot and gave it to me.  I also have many other things that help me remember my old friend and second father. 

Stacy always called me his second son, and we laughed about it.  My parents didn’t mind sharing and Stacy and I were close my entire life.  Now that he is gone I want people to remember him and read about him.  I guarantee Stacy had a positive impact on anyone he ever met.  Like Jesus, he went about life doing good for others.

 
There was only one Rev. Stacy Groscup.  His father Baptized my father when dad was born and I grew up watching Stacy’s amazing shows.  I even tossed targets for him at a number of shows.  When I turned 18, he took a Pepsi can and tossed it into mid air and challenged me to hit it.  I did and that same day he put me in front of an audience shooting aerial targets. 
 
Stacy preferred the shortest bow he could get with the arrow as close to his knuckle as possible.  Fred Bear liked his arrow near his knuckle too.  However I’ve seen Stacy shoot an Onieda eagle, longbow and longer recurves with the same accuracy.  Since he was not a tall man, he liked the bows short.  He could shoot anything with a string on it.  He had an extensive bow collection, everything from antique Turkish coathanger bows to the most modern Black Widow or Zipper.  Golden Eagle even produced a limited edition bow via Zipper with Stacy’s name on it and they also made a video in the 1990’s featuring Stacy.
When the Archery Hall of Fame inducted Stacy as their 49th Inductee, I was very pleased to have been the one that got the nomination packet together.  It was the least I could do for this great man,  As humble as Stacy was he was very honored to be recognized by the sport he loved so much. I loved seeing him at the podium accepting the award and speaking to the group at the ATA dinner in Indianapolis.  When we got back to West Virginia the Governor honored Stacy with the Distinguished West Virginian Award and the WV Senate had him on the floor of the Senate and recognized him.  The West Virginia DNR also hosted a small party for Stacy at their headquarters at the Capital. 
The morning of the Governor’s award Stacy met me at Pop’s archery shop.  We presented Stacy with a Mathews MQ 32 bow.  A member of the media was there to interview Stacy.  I had told them he would be available for interviews but wouldn’t have time to shoot.  The next thing I know Stacy has the brand new MQ bow he’s never shot outside and a reporter filming him shoot discs out of mid air with it.  Now keep in mind Stacy had just driven three hours and was 78 years old.  He hit the aspirin the FIRST shot for the camera.  I was amazed and I had watched him shoot my entire life.  After the shot, Stacy grinned, said we better go and put his sport coat back on and we left to meet with the Governor.  Just another day for Stacy.  I mentioned the feat later that day when I spoke at the Governor’s ceremony.
I could tell you a lifetime of similar stories about Stacy.  Having shared the stage, hunting camps and practice range with him my entire life I can attest to the fact that he was the most consistent instinctive shooter to ever draw a string.  I am not taking away from any of our sport’s legends, living or past, and I consider myself a fair shot, but of us all—instinctive shooters and exhibition shooters, there has never been another like Stacy.  He could hit aerial targets from his stomach, his back, at a full run, or in a variety of positions, and was able to maintain his accuracy through old age.  When he was 82 he joined me on stage and hit the aspirin the 7th shot… at 82 years old.  How many of us will even be able to see an aspirin airborne at that age? 
 
Stacy played a big part in my life and is one of the reasons I do what I do.  He was one of those role models that impact your life and remain unforgettable.  Ted Nugent wrote a song about another friend of mine named Fred Bear.  He wanted future generations to remember Fred.  I thought that was huge of Nugent to do to keep Fred’s name out there for all.
I thought that by using “Groscup method of instinctive shooting” in my media interviews it would help keep Stacy’s name and memory alive.  If you have never heard of Stacy or did not have the opportunity to see his show I am sorry.  When we lost him the sport lost a gentle giant, a legend, and a man that truly lived up to the word hero.   
Until next time, Adios & God Bless.
Shoot Straight,
Frank Addington, Jr.
The Aspirin Buster

 

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