Archive for the 'Bows' Category

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by D.A.Vaughan on 29 Mar 2010

Mi ASA Outdoor Shoot

There will be a Mi ASA Outdoor Shoot on 04-17-10 /04-18-10  

Shotgun Starts at 9:00 am /1:30 pm Both days

30  3D targets

Rolls and Coffee and Lunch available

Chief Okemos Sportsman’s Club

4667 N Gunnell Rd (note some google maps miss spell this road a gannell)

Dimondale,Mi. 48821

Contact-Dave Walter 517 646 0701

e-mail cosc10rings@yahoo.com

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by archerchick on 23 Mar 2010

Trophies in Transitions – By Tim Burres

Trophies in Transitions – by Tim Burres
Bowhunting World October 2005
 
  

Most bowhunters try to hunt these same spots when the season opens. While this is a worthwhile starting point, it is important to note that a buck’s summer range and fall range can be quite different. For example, Mark Drury with Drury Outdoors videos, has been monitoring deer on his Midwest farm with trail cameras for three years. He feels that roughly 60% of the bucks he becomes familiar with have the same summer 

and fall ranges. That means that a full 40% of the bucks relocate at least slightly after they shed their velvet. 

In other words, you can’t be sure you are hunting a certain buck until you see him in that area at least two weeks after velvet shedding, which occurs around the first week of September in most areas. 

Even with that uncertainty factored in, you still have a chance at shooting a trophy the first week of the season. Mature bucks are often still on rough patterns at this time. Through the summer, they’ve become almost predictable, and a part of this lifestyle carries over into the first week of the bow season. 

World OCTOBER 2005Bowhunting 

 

 

Usually these feeding patterns are short-lived, but you may get a full week of excitement before a number of factors, not the least of which is your presence, make the bucks more reclusive.

If you are having trouble finding the bucks during the week before opening day, forget the agricultural flelds and go deeper into the timber. Without a doubt, acorns are the number-one

attraction at this time. Where you find acorns, you will find the deer even if there are abundant agricultural crops nearby. They will literally run to a good acom-bearing tree after a windstorm brings down a load of nuts.

There are two categories of oak trees where most people hunt: red oak and white oak. Each of these categories has several subspecies, but within each category the trees are similar in their application to deer hunting. White oak trees have the potential to drop acorns every year though some years are definitely more bountiful than others are. Red oak trees only drop their acoms every other year. It pays to be able to identifiy each subspecies of oak.

After the acorns play out, the deer will generally drift back to the agricultural crops. They will still hit the alfalfa and clover, but soybeans tend to lose their attractiveness when the leaves and

beans are both drying down. You will see the deer also moving more toward corn and other carbohydrate-rich food sources.

I’ve also sat in some pretty incredible stands when apples and pears were dropping. Bucks zeroed in on the trees moming

and evening, seemingly trying to grab the freshly dropped bounty before other deer beat them to it. Unfortunately, you have to be on the buck’s pattern as soon as the season opens because pressure from other deer hunters and small-game hunters and the buck’s increasing

testosterone level make them change patterns. Even without any hunting pressure, a buck will begin turning into a ghost in early October.

tagging a nice buck during the first week of October depends on your ability to keep the buck from knowing he’s being hunted while you observe and tweak your stand location.

You have to become ultra-sneaky-much more so than is required for success during the rut.

Focus on Afternoon Hunts:

It may be tempting to try to hunt the buck in

the morning near his feeding area, but doing so is going to hurt your chances. You run the risk of moving him off his pattern before you can get enough information to take advantage of it. If you simply have to get into the woods, hunt somewhere else.

Cautious Scouting: Hunting a big buck during the first week of the season is a lot easier if you have seen what he is doing. Hang back with binoculars and learn as much as you can

about the overall situation before committing yourself to a plan. You have to fool many other eyes, ears and noses before the biggest bucks will reach the field. Consider how you will beat

all the deer in the herd before you pick a stand location.

Get Out Clean: More than likely you won’t get the buck you are hunting the very first evening you try for him. That means you will need a good way to get back to your vehicle without spooking the other deer in the feeding area. This is by far the

biggest challenge you will face when hunting food sources. Use the terrain and cover to your advantage. Make a wide circle around the field. Also, if it is impossible to get out clean, have

someone drive up to the field in a truck or ATV and move the deer off before you climb down.

MID-OCTOBER DOG DAYS

The middle of October is the hardest part of the month for tagging a nice buck. Hunting pressure, changing food sources and rising testosterone make bucks very unpredictable and reclusive. They’ll still feed but not in the open, and seeing them during daylight becomes harder.

It is common for a big buck to change pattems shortly after he sheds his velvet and certainly by early October. He seems to disappear from the face of the earth when he was once visible every single evening in his favorite soybean and alfalfa fields. They are still around and they are still active. If you aren’t seeing them you are hunting the wrong places. All deer change their behavior as they go from summer patterns to fall patterns, the main reason for this change is a change in food preferences. Telemetry studies by top research biologists show that the bucks continue to feed during these so called dog days of October. In other words, where is no biological basis for what I have referred to as the “dog days.”

Bucks love to scrape in the cool, damp earth found at the bottoms of draws and ravines. This is a great place to find sign, but a tough place to hunt. When the wind blows, it will swirl through these hollows until every deer in the area knows a man is nearby. Avoid these ravines and draws and focus instead on scrape lines on ridges and in other locations where you can better

control where your scent blows. You may have to hunt the best scrape areas from a distance on routes you feel the buck may use as he goes to freshen them.

CONCLUSION

October is not traditionally a bowhunter’s trophy time, but it is a fun month ro be in the woods. lt is also an excellent time to do your part by shooting a few does to keep the herd in check and supply winter meat.

While October is not as exciting or as productive as the first week of the primary rut, at least you’re hunting. As long as you are in the woods sticking to a sound strategy, anything can happen. It only takes one buck to change the entire season and he can come past at any time – even in October.

Archived by

ARCHERYTALK.COM

all rights reserved

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by archerchick on 22 Mar 2010

Martin Pro Series Scepter – February 1995

Martin Pro Series Scepter – February 1995
Bow Hunting World

Bow Hunting World - February 1995

New level in Bow Design
The Ultimate Bow Available in Hunting or Target Colors

Discover the Magical Wizardry of Martin’s New Scepter
DISCOVER THE MAGICAL WIZARDRY OF MARTIN’S NEW SCEPTER!

The R & D Wizards of Martin Archery have produced a riser that is so well
balanced, so vibration free and so accurate that you won’t need to ask the
mystics why your scores have improved!

A new level of machined aluminum riser design! The Scepter riser
features Martin’s new Tru-TrackTM Arrow Rest System (patent pending) as an integral part of it’s design, Like no other Arrow Rest System, the Tru-Track (patent pending) incorporates on extendable arrow rest mount that extends from within the riser in any position.
Shoot full length, long overdraw or anywhere in between for ultra fine tuning!

An arrow shelf pocket enables the Tru-Track rest to recess completely below the path of the arrow’s flechings,  No other riser design provides this level of clearance!

The Scepter owes it’s total lock of noise and vibration to Martin’s new V.E,C, System (patent pending), The V,E,C, (Vibration Escape ChamberTM) system incorporates a vented riser chamber that is designed to accept optional vibration absorbing inserts.

As the Wizard wields his staff of power, this year’s top shooters will be wielding the new Martin Scepter

Speed Rating: Equipped with new “Z” Cams

the Scepter provides on IBO rating of Over 300 f.p.s.
Machined Aluminum riser in anodized brite blue, red, violet, and hunter grey

Archived by

ARCHERYTALK.COM

all rights reserved

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by archerchick on 22 Mar 2010

Oneida Eagle – By Norb Mullaney

Oneida Eagle–by Norb Mullaney
February 1983

It may not feature pleasing lines, but it sure is one sweetheart of a bow

Long before anyone gave any thought to a compound bow, the principle of the recurved limb was used to increase the tension in the bow string in the early stages of the draw. This was possible
because the recurve effectively shortened the limb moment arm thus requiring a higher draw force to bend the limb in the initial draw.

Many bow designs employed non-working recurves in the limbs – recurves that did not bend to any significant degree when the bow was drawn. Subsequently, modern recurve design went almost entirely to the working recurve. By permitting the recurve to flex along with the rest of the limb it is possible to obtain a smoother drawing bow and greatly reduce stacking in the later stages of the draw.

John Islas’ Eagle, manufactured by Oneida Labs of Canastota, NY, employs non-working recurve limb sections of composite laminated construction, in conjunction with short, solid, tapered F.R.P. power limbs, programmed cams, and a synchronizing system. All of these power and control elements are blended together to produce one of the smoothest shooting, high performance bows that we have tested to date.

In establishing the geometry for a bow it is common practice to locate the center of pressure of the grip on the horizontal centerline of the handle-riser. The Eagle has the center of pressure about two inches below the centerline so that the centerline is actually slightly above the shelf and closer to the point of arrow passage. It can be argued that this arrangement offers a more balanced distribution of push and pull forces along the vertical axis of the bow.

The handle-riser is a magnesium alloy casting with a decided reflexed geometry. The structure has a full length vertical groove on the string-hand side to accept the synchronizing or timing cables. This arrangement relocates the usual crossed cables of most compound bows so that there is no chance of interference with arrow shaft or fletching and, obviously, no need for a cable
guard. The shooting string is located in the plane of the vertical centerline of the bow just as for a straight or recurved bow.

A molded slip-on grip is provided. This grip bridges the cable groove where the hand contacts the handle. The usual AMO standard mounting provisions are provided for bow sight, quiver and stabilizer. The riser is drilled and tapped for a cushion plunger. Very early Eagle bows had this hole positioned too close to the shelf, causing some interference with vane fletching. This has subsequently been raised and is no longer a problem.

At each end of the handle riser a pair of aluminum alloy sheet brackets extend from the face of the bow angling toward the center. These pylon brackets carry the programmed cams and synchronizing pulleys which are tied together and mounted on the same axle. In this manner, the programmed cams are forced to synchronize and thus cause the limb systems to operate in unison. An adjustment slot is provided on the upper synchronizing wheel for exact timing between upper and lower limb systems. The short, solid power or working limbs are fitted with half-cylindrical bearings that rest in receptacles in the ends of the handle riser. Socket-type flat-head limb adjustment bolts are used with countersunk washers to retain the limbs. These power limbs are set at an angle close to thirty degrees to the horizontal, so that most of the flexing action is
vertical rather than forward. This is one of the reasons that this bow has little or no recoil action.

The recurved limbs feature conventional laminated composite construction with significant double taper. Hinge mechanisms with the hinge pins located three inches from the butts of the recurved limbs, attach these limb elements to the tips of the power limbs. In this manner the two limb elements actually overlap for three inches, with a lever arrangement established that can vary from from about 1 to 1 to close to 3 to 1 as the bow is drawn and the recurved limb pivots. Review of the accompanying photographs will clarify this verbal description. The rigging arrangement is also unique. A double, uncoated 3/32 inch diameter power cable runs from the hinge bracket assembly at the tip of the power limb to the two center grooves on the four groove programmed cam. It is retained in the cam by a transverse roll pin. A second double cable assembly (1/16
inch diameter-coated) is anchored in a transverse hole in the cam and threaded in the two outer cam grooves or tracks. It is spread by a special yoke clamp to clear the power limb and is then looped over a molded fitting that is bolted to the extreme butt end of the recurved limb.

The limb and cam action works as follows:

1. Force is exerted on the tip of the re-
curved limb by the act of drawing the bowstring.

2. The recurved limb pushes against the
power limb at the pivot axle and also pulls
on the yoke cable. This combined action starts
the cam to rotate toward the handle-riser.

3. As the cam rotates, the cam lever ratio changes,
requiring more force from the yoke cable to bend the
power limb.  However the lever ratio of the recurved
limb has been increasing at the same time.  This
counteracts some of the  effect of the change in cam ratio.

4. The net result is a rapid rise to peak draw force.  At
this position the oblong cam is centered angularly between
the power cable and is just about ready to roll over.

5. Further draw on the string moves the cam past center
and let-off begins.

6. Let-off continues until the cam rotates to the point
where the power cables lie in the flat sections of the
grooves at the inner ends of the cams.  At this point the
bowstring is perpendicular to the tip section of the recurved
limb and a bottoming condition is established.

Other bows carrying the cams on the handle-riser have employed a simple figure eight cable loop connecting the synchronizing pulleys.  This leaves the cable exposed close to the riser and generally necessitates offsetting the pulleys to provide cable clearance.  On the Eagle, John Islas has provided for routing the synchronizing cables through the  handle-riser using a pair of idler pulleys located between the pylon plates.  These idlers  are mounted on axles set in lugs which are integral with the risers. The idlers are located tangent to the cable groove. The cables run
from the synchronizing pulleys, over the idlers, and through the groove to establish the
timing loop.

It should be understood from the foregoing that the recurved limbs are just as much a part of the force-draw characteristics as the programmed cams and the normal limb-string geometry of the bow as it is drawn. The recurves shorten the moment or lever arms of the secondary limbs, assisting in obtaining greater string tension at brace height and a steep initial slope for the force-draw curve.  However, this desirable trait is also a function of the cam design. At brace height position, the cams have lever ratios also designed to promote high string tension.

It is important to recognize that the recurved limbs are very rigid and essentially non-working. Measurements taken across the distance from tip to butt varied only about one-eighth inch between brace height and full draw.

For the Eagle, the force-draw characteristic is a very complex function of string angle, recurved limb angle, instantaneous cam ratio and power limb angle and spring factor. All of these elements work together to provide the highly effective and very smooth force-draw curve.

The Eagle uses a straight forward shooting string much like a recurve bow, except that it must be strong enough to withstand the stress imposed by the high level of energy generated.

At the present time this bow is available in a single adjustable draw weight range of 45 to 65 pounds. Draw length can be obtained in four nominal ranges; 28 to29,29 to 30, 30 to 31 and 31 to 32 inches. At the factory, draw length variation is effected by modifying the recurved limb bolt hole pattern and changing string length. For short draw lengths a change of cam is required.

The spreader yoke can function as a positive draw check or stop if desired. It is a simple operation to set it and this does not affect the geometry of the yoke cable. The socket-head cap screw that clamps the yoke is loosened and the yoke is repositioned to bottom against the face of the power limb at the desired maximum draw length. A strip of pressure sensitive tape can be applied to the limb at the line of contact to prevent marring. Care should be exercised to bottom both yokes at the same draw position. A left-hand model is planned but is not yet available.

Admittedly an unusual looking bow, the Eagle is cleverly designed and well-built with
evidence of thoughtful engineering throughout.

The Tests

The Eagle we have had for test was rated 45 to 65 pounds draw weight with a draw length
of 29-30 inches. It was equipped with a cushion plunger and a flipper rest which were used for all test shooting. Preliminary hand shooting revealed several surprising characteristics that would require thorough investigation during the test program. First, at 60 pounds this bow seemed as easy and pleasant to draw as any compound we have tested.  Second, it was remarkably smooth during the power stroke with almost imperceptible recoil action. Third, even without the aid of chronograph verification a high level of performance was obvious.

Our test program was established for three levels of peak draw force; 50, 55 and 60 pounds, with a common draw length of 30 inches (AMO). The static tests always give a good indication of what we can expect in the way of performance – the Eagle was no exception. Fig. I displays the force-draw curves we obtained for each of the test conditions. In a number of ways these curves differ from both the conventional (eccentric type) and the programmed cam characteristics. Like the programmed cam they reach peak draw force early in the draw cycle (about 12 inches) but they do not have a lengthy dwell. The longest dwell is two inches at the 50 pounds P.D.F. level. Beyond the peak, the let-off is similar to a conventional eccentric with a very precise and consistent bottom between 30 and 31 inches draw (AMO).

The let-off varied between 39 and 41.7 percent, increasing slightly with increase in
draw weight.

The design of these force-draw curves is such that the draw seems exceptionally smooth and unstraining, so that it leaves one somewhat unaware of the amount of stored energy that is being generated. However, note the tabulated values of stored energy and the S.E./P.D.F. ratio. They are noticeably higher than for conventional compounds and rival the values we associate with programmed cams. This is a forecast of the performance we cited previously.

Static hysteresis is a measurement of the friction in the compounding system. The Eagle shows about two percent higher than a typical two-wheeler in this characteristic. It isn’t difficult to pinpoint the cause. Running the synchronizing cables through two ninety degree bends (idler pulleys) and also through the handle-riser will account for more than two percent. The basic cable system must be quite efficient.

Table 2 is a tabulation of values of bow or dynamic efficiency and arrow velocity for a wide range of arrow weight for each of the three test conditions. Curves of the arrow velocity given in Table 2 are plotted in Fig. 2.

Bow efficiency is the initial kinetic energy of the launched arrow expressed as a percentage of the stored energy of the bow. It is a measure of just how well a given bow transfers to the launched arrow the energy required to draw it to the specified draw length. We have generally found that the very high performance programmed cam bows have lower efficiency than we find for the better class of two-wheel compounds using circular eccentrics.

We do not attribute this general trend (which ranges from minus three to minus ten percent) entirely to characteristics inherent in the bow. There is significant evidence to argue that some of it is caused by losses involved in transferring the higher level of energy to the arrow and to increased reaction forces on the arrow. The Eagle demonstrates minimum efficiency loss when compared to the better two-wheelers with eccentrics. This is also obvious in the arrow velocity levels obtained in the machine shot and chronographed tests. Despite its easy-drawing feel it achieved a Rating Velocity (60 lbs.-30 inches-54O grains) of 219.89 feet per second.  Using mathematical synthesis we also calculated relative Rating Velocities at the 50 and 55 pound levels. These showed slight improvement when compared to the 60 pound peak draw force. This can be attributed to slightly improved bow efficiency and energy storage ratio as draw weight was reduced.

For those readers familiar with our prior Rating Velocity standard of 50 pounds-28 inches-500 grains, we also computed that rating at the 50 pound test level. At 198.25 feet per second it is nearly 10 feet per second higher than the best eccentric two-wheelers we have tested.

Without question the Eagle merits placement in our “super performance” category. But beyond that, we must also salute it as exceptionally smooth and pleasant shooting.

General Commentary

As with other programmed cam type high performance bows, we found that the Eagle favors heavier and stiffer arrows. At 60 pounds P.D.F. we obtained good launch and flight from Graphlex Yellow and 2216 aluminum shafts up to 30 inches draw length. This included field points as well as broadheads of various types. We liked 2117 shafts at 55 pounds and 2117 and 2018 shafts at 50 pounds. Release shooters may be able to stretch these poundages somewhat but we could not obtain consistently clean launch and flight with lighter shafts than those cited.

We have already commented on the remarkable smoothness of the Eagle in both draw and release. It is also a relatively quiet bow.

Because of its unusual limb action. the string angle at full draw is more acute than on other 48 inch bows. This means that there is more finger-pinch present. We didn’t find it objectionable at 30 inches draw; however, it is inherent in the bow design. Also inherent in the limb design and action is unusual stability and tiller control. We felt that it seemed quite resistant to bow hand torque.

Perhaps the Oneida Eagle is an odd looking bow. Its only claim to grace and beauty may be the recurved limbs, unless you’re an engineering type who perceives beauty in function and mechanism. But we suggest that you reserve comment until you have an opportunity to shoot this bow. We believe it has a combination of fine shooting qualities that are rare indeed.

Archived by

ARCHERYTALK.COM

all rights reserved

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by archerchick on 20 Feb 2010

Tarzan’s Tips For Beginners -by Steve Barde

Tarzan’s Tips For Beginners by Steve Barde

December 1975

Jock Mahoney’s Archery Feats Are On Film, But The King Of The Jungle Shows He Hasn’t Forgotten The Rudiments In This Primer For All Beginners!

http://www.bowandarrowhunting.com

December 1975

TARZAN MOVIES ARE as popular today as some decades ago, and a good portion of today’s younger ticket buyers recognize the loin cloth-clad hero mostly for his ‘gator  ‘rasslin’, vine swingin’ and yodelin’.

What most have forgotten or didn’t know in the first place is that the character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs was supposed to be a regular tack-driver with the bow and arrow. Not only could he outshoot the late Howard Hill, but he also could manufacture all of his tackle from raw jungle materials with relative ease.

Normal folks realize that authors sometimes create fictional characters with larger-than-life abilities. After all, who really believes that Tarzan could bring at a run all manner of wild game simply through a series of vocal contortions? But, as more than one screen actor has been known to comment, most movie directors are anything but normal!

As an example, ten years ago BOW & ARROW reported the exploits of the then-current Tarzan, Jock Mahoney, on the set of Tarzan Goes to India. Besides riding the herd bull on various elephant stampedes, Tarzan Mahoney was required – among other things – to cluster three fresh-cut, crooked shafts into a half dollar-sized group in a tree trunk some fair distance away. Though remote, this was conceivably possible, if the archer had a good bow. Mahoney’s bow Was anything but. As he describes it:

“One end was a sort of arthritic, partial recurve. The other end was twice as thick and curvy as a broom handle. Torque? Yes, the heavy end had twice as much as the small end and in the opposite direction. Every time I shot an arrow in the air, I had to tighten the string, because the bow lost some poop somewhere.”

Somehow, the actor managed to put the three arrows into the designated spot from about twenty feet, thus proving the director might have been right all along. There wasn’t any doubt in the latter’s mind following a later feat with bow and arrow, however.

In this case, Mahoney was astride a charging bull elephant, leading a herd that was stampeding wildly toward a wall in the distance. The script called for Tarzan to launch an arrow far in front of the stampeding herd, the dynamite stick strapped to the shaft blowing a hole in the wall so the elephants could continue rushing forward. As Jock Mahoney relates, he shot the shaft and, after glancing at the elephants surrounding him, looked forward to see the shaft slowly arcing
earthward far short of its intended destination. In fact, it was descending close to the spot Mahoney would reach as his elephant raced ahead!

Perhaps out of self-preservation, he reached out and caught the falling arrow, then renocked and fired it again.  All this from elephant-back at thirty miles per hour, no less! That feat surely would convert even the most skeptical director!

It only was natural, then, to take beginner lessons from a man who’d performed these miracles – especially if he’s your father. At least, that’s what Princess Meliss O’Mahoney thought.

Brought up on the banks of the Mississippi, Jock Mahoney – legally Jacques O’Mahoney – received his introduction to archery at a young age. His first bows were fashioned from green willow wands, but he later advanced to a sixty-six-inch recurve made of modern materials that generated sixty pounds of pull at his twenty-eight-inch draw length.

So when daughter Princess asked for instruction, Tarzan was ready. He outfitted the lithesome, five-foot, ten-inch actress with an Eichoitz Bowhunter model scaling twenty-five pounds.

“The greatest problem for beginners in archery lies in the fact that they won’t admit they can’t handle a heavy bow,” Mahoney told his pupil, standing in the backyard of his Del Mar, California, home. “They read articles about hunters who shoot sixty and seventy-pound bows, or target champions who shoot all day with forty or forty-five-pound bows, but they find, when they try to pull these heavy units, they just don’t have the knowledge or the muscle.

“You build a whole new set of muscles when you take up the sport of archery,” continued his daughter’s gray-haired mentor, “and it’s not just brute strength that puts an arrow in the center of the target. It’s a knowledge of how to pull and hold, among other things.”

Mahoney then launched into a discourse on the nomenclature of the bow and its assorted accessories, so Princess would know to which part her instructor was referring. He then braced the bow and handed it to the aspiring archer. Being right-handed, she immediately switched the bow to her left hand.

“Don’t question, just listen,” ordered Tarzan, explaining the process of drawing the arrow back to a constant anchor in this case, the corner of the mouth – with the first finger of her right hand.
“This system seems the easiest to learn, since you have less to think about,” informed Mahoney. “Besides, it works great for me and if I can do it, you can”

A Port Orford cedar shaft was withdrawn from a box and the nock, fletching and field point next were explained. The discourse was meant to reduce tension and prevent his pupil from trying to shoot too soon.  “Now, assume a comfortable stance,” commanded Mahoney, who recently finished filming To Speak As Brothers in Oregon for release in late 1975. “Set your feet at right angles to the target. Space them apart enough that you’ve got good balance, but not too wide, Now raise the bow and pivot towards the target.”

The tall actor then circled his pupil several times, adjusting and altering her stance slightly. He then moved the target to within approximately ten paces and addressed himself to the matter of proper grip. “There are many styles and methods of gripping a bow handle,” he informed his student, who was becoming restless. “You can grip it until the knuckles turn white, but if you do, the bow will have a tendency to torque.”

The puzzled expression on Princess O’Mahoney’s face led to more in-depth explanation of torquing. “This means erratic flight of the arrow and inconsistency in your shooting and hitting ability,” elaborated. her mentor. “Hitting a target consistently is enough of a problem without making additional ones.”

Returning to the matter of grip, Mahoney added, “If you open-hand the bow, hold it in the web of the left hand and allow drawing of the bow to hold it in place until the arrow is released, you can develop the habit of grabbing for the bow just prior to release. This also gives bad arrow flight to the target.
“Perhaps the simplest and least-complicated method is to hold the bow lightly but firmly in the bow-hand and, after you’ve overcome some of the basic problems, you can experiment to find the system that works best for you.” “If I have to listen to another
lengthy discussion like the last one. I’ll be too old to worry about shooting at all!” grumbled the aspiring archer under her breath.

“We’re getting there,” answered Mahoney with a paternal glower. “Don’t rush me!”

An arrow then was nocked on the bowstring. The nocking point had been installed in the proper position, a quarter-inch above the right angle to the string at the point opposite the arrow rest. “The arrow goes under the nocking point, since it’s perhaps easier for the beginner – that’s you – to place an upward pressure on the arrow,” interjected Tarzan. “There’s also less chance of the arrow riding up and causing wild shots. Okay, now draw the bow.”

As she began pulling back on the string, her illustrious father reached over and deftly plucked the arrow off the string. In response to her quizzical expression, the erstwhile King of the
Jungle instructed Princess O’Mahoney to try full draw several times before nocking an arrow and shooting.

Realizing it was almost time to shoot, the archer dutifully did as instructed. The arrow was replaced on the string. “Now come back to full draw, then hold until I tell you to shoot,” he said, Grinning, she began to draw the shaft, but found it wanted to flop off the left side of the bow, away from the handle. “That’s from trying to use your thumb,” explained Mahoney. “Cut off the thumb with your mind and forget you have it. You unconsciously try to grasp the arrow with the thumb and you just don’t need it in this sport; at least, not with the normal three-finger draw and release technique.”

As instructed, Ms. O’Mahoney forgot her thumb and smoothly drew the arrow to her anchor point. Her head bobbed up and down as she tried to see what the arrow and target relationship would look like. When told to shoot, the arrow sailed high and over the target.

“What happe….”
“Don’t worry about hitting the target,” Mahoney advised, cutting her off. “Just try to get an arrow in the backstop. After you get one in it, then try for the target. You can start trying to drive tacks or whatever later on. Learn to shoot first, then where to shoot.”

Another arrow and another miss brought a pained look to the archer’s face. “From thls close range, hold the tip of the arrow below the target on the Korky backstop,” her mentor instructed. “You don’t really see what you shoot at; you see under it at some ranges, over it at others.”

With a dubious shake of her head, Princess O’Mahoney came to full draw, held and, when the arrow plunked into the rubberized cork of the backstop, it was dead-center in the square target.
There’s nothing quite like that first good hit to bring smiles to the faces of both student and teacher.
“That’s great!” Mahoney erclaimed. “Now all you need do is practice’and keep putting them in the same spot. Problems will develop, but we’ll work them out after you acquire them. Telling you about them now could influence your shooting. “All you need for target shooting is to try turning yourself into a shooting machine,” added Tarzan, “to put all the arrows in one spot. The oniy difference between the hit you just made and one at a hundred yards is a matter of elevation and aiming. There are factors of wind and temperature, but don’t worry about them now.”

No matter how advanced she becomes, it’s doubtful that this sister of actress Sally Field, and an actress in her own right, will find herself adorned in a loin cloth atop a charging elephant. That would be stretching Tarzan a little far, even for a director!
<– <<

Archived by

ARCHERYTALK.COM

all rights reserved

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by archerchick on 20 Feb 2010

Interview with the ELK EXPERT – By Bow & Arrow Hunting Staff

Interview With The Elk Expert  By B&AH Staff
If you’re looking for elk hunting wisdom, bowhunter Dan Evans of Plains, Montana has a lot to offer.

NOTE: With 16 record-book bull elk to his credit, Dan Evans – designer and owner of the famous Trophy Taker Drop-Away rest – is considered one of this nation’s most successful elk bowhunters, Even more impressive is that Dan killed his first archery bull in 1992, and most if not all of Dan’s big elk have come from public-land areas.  Given Dan’s success, we took the opportunity to survey his knowledge.  We asked Dan a variety of specific questions that should help you become an elk expert yourself.
http://www.bowandarrowhunting.com

Bow & Arrow Hunting: Looking at your success at bowhunting elk, you’ve obviously done very well, especially at harvesting trophy-class animals. If you had to summarize your formula in how you approach hunting big elk, what would it be? Where should an average bowhunter start?

Evans: First off. you have to hunt where there are big bulls. To find good elk areas, surf the Internet, read magazines, talk to biologists and game wardens and even join a club like Garth Carter’s Hunter Services to keep up to date on the hot areas. Once you’ve found a good area to hunt,
spend as much time as you can there, Learning the terrain and the animals. There is no substitute for time. With enough time, sooner or later you’ll get your opportunity.

Second, once you’ve found a bull to go after, you must do what’s necessary to get within bow range of this animal. This means making the right calls when needed and staying mobile to ambush or tail a bull. You just have to improvise in each situation on what to do, but you must be ultra cautious by constantly monitoring the wind, mimicking sounds like a real elk would make, and simply being as stealthy as possible.

And last, but certainly not least, you should be fully confident in making the shot once it’s presented. I know too many guys that hunt smart but when it comes down to the shot, they blow it. Do what you can to work the bugs out of your equipment and mental shooting ability.
Remember that it really only takes about a minute to set up on a bull and make a killing shot. Make it count!

B&HA: How do you go about accessing trophy-rich elk areas?
Do you day-hunt away from the truck, or do you pack in
using your two legs, horses, ATV etc.?

Evans: I do it all. I day-hunt close to the truck or a four-wheeler and even
spike out every now and then. You have to remember that you don’t have
to be way in the backcountry to kill elk. In fact, I’ve shot every one of my
bulls within 5 miles of a vehicle. I really think a lot of hunters fail to hunt the
‘buffer zone’ which I classify as the areas 1 to 5 miles away from roads.
This is because most do-it-yourself hunters hunt about a mile or so lion
their trucks, and when going with outfitters, hunt areas well beyond 5 Miles
from the nearest road, This leaves a lot of non-hunted areas in between.

B&AH: Would you recommend hiring an outfitter if you’re limited on time or have little experience hunting elk?

Evans: Yes, time spent in the field is the key to taking big elk. If you don’t
have the time, then you should hire someone who does.

B&AH: What hunting technique do you prefer to employ when hunting
elk-calling, taking a stand, or spot and stalk? Also, do you often hunt alone
or with a buddy? If alone, are you still able to call effectively?

Evans: I use all of them. I’ve killed a lot of my elk by calling, a few by
taking a stand and by spot and stalk. I hunt almost exclusively alone. It’s
more difficult to call alone, but I make it work, plus I like the sense of
accomplishment I get from killing an elk all by myself. Really you shouldn’t
limit yourself to one hunting method.

B&AH: In preparing for an elk hunt, what would you suggest to our readers
on how to properly prepare? Is physical fitness all that important?

Evans: Being in good shape is definitely important. But, and this is a big but, being smart and patient is more important. You have to have mental stamina too. This is very important.
Honestly it comes down to being in the right place at the right time, and you need the right
mindset (mental toughness) to get you there. Remember – it only takes a couple of minutes to be successful on a two-week hunt, so don’t give up!

B&AH: Do you think bugling works well on today’s hard-hunted, call-shy elk?  If so, do you use a bugle just as a locator call?

Evans: My theory on calling is simple. If you can convince an elk you’re in fact an elk, it’ll work. If not, it won’t. You must call well enough to not leave any doubts in an elks mind that you’re artificial. I’ve been pretty successful at this by imitating the bull’s bugle and tone. But this only works when
I’ve done everything else right like getting close enough to entice a fight. I’ve found in most cases, big elk will move away from you almost always, so I continue to follow the bull until I can eventually get him turned. I like to close the gap to about 40 yards or so. This way the bull only has to turn back 20 yards before he’s in range. You have remember-hunting big bulls and small bulls are two entirely different things. A big bull is careful even if you sound like a real elk.

B&AH: Most serious elk hunters admit that cow calls when used properly can lure in even the most pressured elk. Do you agree? Also, when you use a cow call, how do you use it and can you recommend your favorite models?

Evans: Producing the right cow sounds at the right time will coax in a big bull, but it has ro be perfect. Otherwise, even a cow call wont do it. Elk have to believe it’s real. I highly recommend a smooth-sounding diaphragm call in conjunction with a raspy blow-through call. I have used
several different diaphragms by Larry D. Jones, Primos and Barry Game Calls; blow-through calls by Primos, Sceery, Carlton and Woodswise; and I use bugles by Prirnos and Barry Game Calls. My advice is to master the diaphragm call. When a bull comes in, you’ll need to stop him, and
you’ll need a mouth diaphragm to do this.

B&AH: What about calf sounds or other alternate methods, such as raking a tree, kicking a few rocks, or other common sounds elk often make when challenged by another bull?

Evans: When calling, I don’t try to be silent. In thick country, like where I hunt a lot in northern Idaho, the key is to make any sound an elk would make. I even sometimes pull grass out from the ground to imitate an elk grazing. Be noisy, just don’t do anything that doesn’t sound natural.

B&AH: Have you tried decoys?

Evans: I’ve tried decoys a few times, but so far I haven’t been real impressed. I do like the designs by Montana Decoy and plan on putting them to use this fall. If you use a decoy, make sure you can set it up easy and that it’s quiet.

B&AH: What would you consider the biggest mistakes most bowhunters make when hunting elk?

Evans: One, not watching the wind enough. Two, making too many non-elk-like calls. Three, expecting a bull to come to them. Four, not being in the right places at daylight and dark. And five, not being prepared to take the shot when it arrives.  When hunting mountainous country where elk
reside, you have to remember that the wind is constantly
changing-so keep an eye on it, always. Also, don’t make an elk sound (calling or tree-raking noise) if it doesn’t fit with the situation you’re in. And never expect a bull to come to you. Instead, move, and make something happen. Moreover, I can’t state how important it is to be in the woods at prime time-meaning at your specific ambush spot (wallow, saddle, meadow etc.) at light and just before dark. Most hunters time their hunt so they leave the truck or camp at light and arrive back at
dark. If being in the dark scares you, you’ll have to overcome it. And last, be sure you and your bow setup are ready to perform when needed. Do whatever you can to expose yourself to high-pressure situations by shooting in front of friends, competing in 3-D tournaments, and so on.

B&AH: What about shooting equipment? Do 4ou think light arrows and mechanical broadheads dispatch big elk cleanly? Or do you recommend medium- to heavy-weight arrows and conventional broadheads?

Evans: The bottom line is to hit what you’re aiming at, so, shoot the heaviest bow you can handle comfortably in  awkward shooting positions, like from your knees and butt. Regarding mechanical broadheads, I’ve killed five bulls with mechanical-type heads, but I’ve gone back to fixed-blade heads. I don’t like two-blades, and to get the penetration needed with a mechanical you should shoot a two-blade or a three-blade model with a small cutting diameter. Besides, I’ve had mechanicals deflect on impact and not always leave an entry hole. This is another reason why I’ve
designed the Trophy Taker rest. It allows you to shoot great groups using fixed-blade heads. In arrows, I recommend medium- to heavy-weight shafts.

B&AH: What does your personal hunting setup consist of?

Evans: I shoot a Martin Scepter IIXRG with Fury Cams, somewhere between 75 and 80 pounds of peak weight.  This bow is a great long-draw bow that’s 43 inches long with an 8 inch brace height. It shoots Easton 460-grain ACC 3/7l arrows, using a 725-grain head, at 285 fps. I use 360 Flex Fletch vanes with a strong helical, Winner’s Choice custom bowstrings made of BCY’s 452 material, and a tied-on string loop. I also use a bow quiver, Sims Vibration Labs products, my Trophy Taker rest and a prototype Trophy Taker pin sight (available next year). I prefer the Carter Lock Jaw 2000
release (open head) because I can adjust the trigger for zero travel. For most bowhunters, I recommend keeping arrow speed under 275 fps with fixed-blade heads. I can shoot a touch faster, but I constantly tinker with my equipment for perfect arrow flight.

B&AH: It’s obvious you believe in your Trophy Taker drop-away rest.  Do you think it has added to your success as well? If so , in what ways?

Evans: I’ve been using the rest for six years, and I’ve never had a failure. What I like best about this rest is that its simple, it tunes easy, allows for great arrow flight with any style fletching and nock twist, and its quiet-on the draw and after the shot. I designed it to have no “problem points,” like small screws, exposed springs and plastic construction. Plastic works for a lot of things, but I don’t want it on my arrow rest.

When it comes down to it, Dan attributes most of his success to spending plenty of time in the field. He'll hunt no less than seven to 10 days. This way he's assured he'll eventually get the right opportunity

B&AH: When preparing for an upcoming elk hunt, what does your shooting practice consist of?

Evans: I like to keep all of my arrows in a 6-inch circle on elk-size animals. So I do
what is necessary to shoot this accurately. I shoot in 3-Ds, shoot small game constantly
and I practice in my backyard from all different shooting positions. I also always sight my
bow in to my rangefinder. And I shoot broadheads as much as possible. This is absolutely critical.

B&AH: Taking into consideration all the elk you’ve bagged over the years, what would you consider an average shot distance using archery tackle?

Evans: Of the 17 bulls I shot with my bow, my average shot distance comes out to 34 yards. But I wouldn’t get hung up on averages. You should become as proficient at the furthest shooting distance possible. But remember, you must be 100-percent confident in making the shot before
you draw your bow. If it doesn’t feel right, don’t take the shot. I’m very proud of the fact that I’ve only taken shots I know I could make. Since taking my first elk in 1992, I’ve shot 18 bulls and recovered 17. And I’ve never missed a shot. If you prepare correctly and are careful, this kind of record is within every bowhunter’s reach. <—-<<

Archived by

ARCHERYTALK.COM

all rights reserved

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by archerchick on 19 Feb 2010

HOWARD HILL LIVES – By Sam Fadala

HOWARD HILL LIVES  – By Sam Fadala
February 1977
….Through The Dedication And Skills Of His Appointed Predecessors, Who Carry On The Tradition Of The Famed Hill Longbow

http://www.bowandarrowhunting.com

February 1977

Sam Fadala is an outdoor writer specializing in hunting, fishing, conservation and natural history.


Tucked away in a mountain valley is the small town of Hamilton, Montana.  The area holds promise for the archer in the form of big whitetail bucks that sneak the beautiful Bitterroot River bottom, and the elk, moose, mule deer and black bear that frequent the hills all around.  Hamilton is also important to the bow and arrow enthusiast for another reason:  It is the home of the Howard Hill Archery Company and Long Bow Manufacturing, producers of the famous Hill-style longbow and accouterments.

Ted Ekin runs the shop.  John Schulz builds the bows.  Friends and students of Howard  Hill, both men are today continuing the tradition established by the world’s greatest archer by the manufacture and sale of the bows and equipment he used, and in perpetuating the Hill method of shooting the bow.  I spent five hours in Ekin’s shop and Schulz’s little factory handling the merchandise, watching bows go together one at a time, listening to both men tell of Hill and his feats, witnessing Schulz shoot wooden discs out of the air and trying the longbow for myself.

As a youth I had many a lemonwood straight-stick bow.  It seems that youngsters almost invent the bow all over again each generation, and the first models are bent bamboo poles or –in my case –an oleander limb with string.  So I had experience with straight bows, but had never tried the handmade split-bamboo laminated creations fostered by Hill and his followers –until the trip to Hamilton.

I not only had the chance to try the bows, but I also hefted the arrow that Howard shot his big bull elephant with back in 1950.  And I saw the shafts Hill used to shoot at the Sheriff of Nottingham’s men in the film “Robin Hood.”  I had always wondered how they managed the famous split-arrow shot when Robin won the big tournament in Merry Olde England.  Not trick photography at all, Hill performed that feat in real life, with actors, extras, and cameras looking on to verify it.

Ted Ekin met Howard Hill in California.  Ted was an enthusiastic archer and tournament shooter at the time and, in 1960, he coupled his love for archery with Hill’s in a business venture.  Archery was not yet enjoying widespread interest and sales were slow.  Later on, Ekin got tired of the big city and decided to move to less populated climes.  He found himself in Hamilton, Montana, along with the love for the longbow that followed him wherever he went.

He had to try again, and he did in Hamilton.  Of course, he needed someone to build the bows to Hill’s specs because they were going to be fully endorsed by the famous archer.  Looking for the right man was easy.  Hill had known John Schulz since Schulz was a boy, and he had taught him patiently how to craft the longbow just right.  Ekin got ahold of Schulz, told him what he had in mind and Schulz moved to Hamilton.  The bowyer set up the longbow company making the Hill bow exclusively for Ted Ekin.

John Schulz gluing a bow together. After it is glued, it will be put into an oven for a specified amount of time.

I knew a few moments after meeting Schulz that he was used to dealing with people who didn’t know much about longbows.  He handed me an eighty-four pound model and I almost pitched it right over my head.  It only weighed nineteen ounces!

“That feels like a bow, doesn’t it,” Schulz stated, no question intended.  I had to admit it did.  I expected an eighty-four pounder to have some physical weight to go with it.

“The true longbow,’ Schulz instructed me, “is not wide limbed, but thin, instead, and deep cored -thick, in other words, this makes ’em shoot right. In a word, they are stable.
Several straight bows are being made today, but they are not the Hill-type of longbow that Howard Hill insisted on.”

The other types, I learned were flat-limbed straight bows, and having seen them I could tell a difference between the longbow and the straight-bow types, as Schulz made the distinction.
Today, the company builds several models: The Big Five and Tembo – Top of the line models with split-bamboo laminations – followed by the Mountain Man, Halfbreed and Redman – all handmade.
None of the hill bows come off a press, and that is why you must have a bowyer, a craftsman, someone who puts them together one at a time.

Another bow in the line is the Howard Hill Commemorative, only seventy-five of them made – one for each year of Hill’s life.  These sell for around $500, but the top of the line Big Five goes for about $140, with the Mountain Man running around $90.  Aside from bows, there are the Hill style armguards and shooting gloves, as well as a fine back quiver made of tanned leather.  I especially liked the quiver.  Hill designed it and he must have done so after years of trial and error because it feels just right on the back and is easy to draw from.

Schulz looked me straight in the eye, grabbed up the eighty-four pound bow I had been admiring and twisted the string hard, right next to the bow nock. “That would unstring a recurve bow,” he said. “But it won’t bother this one because of that same word I mentioned earlier – stability.  Hill told me he didn’t believe he could have performed his feats with the bow if he had had to use a more sensitive type.

“These bows are not sensitive,” Schulz went on, ” and you don’t shoot them the way you do a compound or a recurve.”  I had a feeling I was in for a lesson, and I was right.  Ekin and Schulz walked over to the ever-present shooting bales by the shop and Schulz shot while Ekin talked.

“You should have seen Howard shoot,” Ekin said.  “He was fluid. He was smooth. He said you had to keep the right momentum.  If you drew rapidly, you shot fast. If you drew slowly, you shot slower.  It was a rhythm that you didn’t break.”

Hill did not shoot straight up, head high.  He leaned into his shot as a good shotgunner does.  In fact, the best comparison I can think of to explain his way of handling the bow is a comparison of rifle and shotgum shooting.  The rifleman stands tall and relaxed – but not loose.  He aims deliberately and usually has a device to help him aim.  He squeezes off carefully.  Most of us shoot a bow this way, maybe because we are, basically a nation of riflemen.

The good shotgunner is loose and natural in his swing, leaning a bit forward perhaps, relaxed,
not choking down on his gun, maintaining a smooth balance and flow.  That was Hill.  And that was why he could hit moving targets.  He passed this style of shooting on to his young partner, John Schulz, almost twenty years ago and Schulz went on to give exhibitions of his own, most recently at the Pennsylvania Bowhunter’s Festival where Schulz’s shooting and talking earned him an invitation to next year’s meet.

Watching a longbow shooter at work, one would think he does not actually sight his bow.  He does, but not with a device.  He sights his bow by knowing several things almost intuitively:  the range, the arc of the arrow to get to that range, the size of the target and the relationship of all the variables.  All of us have some facility at this kind of aiming.  If we toss a rock at a tin can forty feet away we will be close most of the time, even though the rock pitched is ill-shaped and uneven, varying in weight from other stones we might pitch right after it.

We don’t have any sights on that rock but know fairly well how to launch it because we have a feeling for how much power it will take to reach the target, how much arc, how large the target is and the relationship of all these things.  Longbows don’t normally wear sights because this instinctive type of shooting style is employed with them.

They say Hill looked at the point of his arrow and the gap it made with the target, above or below it.  This may be, and I have no way of knowing how true it is, but I would bet a dollar to a gumdrop that Hill felt his way to the target using the instinctive principles we all have facility for when we practice.

Purists that they are, Ekin and Schulz have studied the bow type they like so well and compared it  with the more elaborate fashions on the market today.  Their witnessed findings interested me, as I think they will the reader.  First, actual performance of the Hill-type laminated bamboo fiberglass bow is up with other types of instruments.

“When we get bow orders, the customer always seems to ask for something ten pounds heavier than his present recurve ‘so it will shoot with it'” say’s Schulz  “I don’t know why.  Usually I will write back and suggest that he buy a bow of the same weight because the longbow shoots right with the other types.”

Schulz is especially upset when people tell him that compounds will shoot fifty percent faster than his stick bows.  At one meet, a bow company had a chronograph set up and Schulz shot his personal longbow against a compound.  The compound won, by three foot-seconds of speed.

“Now, that is hardly fifty percent,”  Schulz chuckled.  Both bows were about the same weight and the same arrows were shot.  Of course, a compound can use light spined arrows in many cases and then it will gain in the velocity domain, but even then a full fifty percent will seldom be the case.

On hunts or wherever  archers gather, Schulz and Ekin are willing to put their Hill bows up against the recurves and compounds that are present, and so far they have not been embarrassed by the performance of the so-called old-fashioned longbow.  Shooting for cast distance, they outranged many a modern factory recurve in the presence of other archers.  Difference of opinion makes not only the horse race, but also the existence of different styles and types of equipment, of course.  But I did learn that thinking of the longbow of today as that lemonwood stick of yesteryear is a mistake.

Schulz went on to explain that the biggest problem he had in bow orders was the tendency for archers to overtax themselves in bow pull.  Par of this, he felt, was the old wives’ tale  about the longbow having to weigh more to perform well.  I suspect, too, that when we order a Hill bow we have an image of the master in our minds and we are somewhat ashamed to say “Send me a fifty-five pounder” when Howard used an eighty-five in his backyard for practice.

Hill reasoned that he could gain speed, thus having to worry less about arrows varying widely from his line of sight,and also gain penetration by learning to draw heavy pulls.  He was, of course, right.  He also worked his way up to those big bows of one hundred and more pounds.  He did not start with them.  Hill was a powerful man.  With several onlookers he strung a one hundred-pound bow while sitting in a chair.  He was about 60 years old at the time.

As archers, we have to first of all be honest with ourselves when it comes to bow weight, and we have to acknowledge the fact that we are not sissies just because our bows don’t pull ninety pounds.  But I’m guilty.  Having made it to seventy pounds I figured I would go one step further and try the thrill of whistling arrows out of an eighty.  I was whistling alright, but not arrows.  The whistle was a “whew!” as I strained back on the string.  After using up two full tubes of liniment on my sore muscles, I dropped back to the seventy.

There is a current trend to return to traditional archery and the equipment that goes with it, while at the same time compound bow sales soar and new models appear, it seems, weekly.  I like the trend.  It makes sense to me.  We should have the choice of equipment, and we should be able to expand our tackle so that we have several kinds if we want to.  I have a good rifle, but it doesn’t mean that I am going to throw my shotgun away.  They compliment each other and serve at different capacities.

Besides, the argument of longbow versus recurve versus compound is mostly academic in the first place and is something akin to comparing bananas and apples which are both fruit, but that is where the comparison ends – shape, texture and constitution being vastly different.  The same holds true for the bow types, and Howard Hill knew it.  Sure, the longbow was for him.  He loved the simplicity and the high performing stability, but he also said, “No matter what kind of bow you shoot, no matter whether you shoot freestyle or barebow, if you are shooting with a bow and arrow I am with you.”

As for the scientific arguments that underrate the longbow and take two reams of graph paper, a calculator and twenty formulae to decipher, well, remember that scientifically the bumblebee cannot in any way manage to fly.  His mass is too great for the wing surface and his muscle structure too limited.  Please, though, don’t tell the bee.  He doesn’t know he can’t fly and it might prove a hell of a disappointment for him to find out.

Schulz and his son John clamp a bow that has been glued. The laminations are bamboo and glass

The longbow is a worthy addition to the tackle of the modern archer.  In a world of supersonic flight and computerized living, it is refreshing to handle a tool basic and simple, and that is the longbow.  It’s somewhat refined today with modern cements bonding split bamboo to risers of bubinga and rosewood, but traditional in form all the same.

While a spaceship scoops a cup of Martian soil with its metallic hand, depositing the dust into a scientific chamber for analyses, some of us are taking a few moments out of a busy schedule to propel feathered shafts from a bent stick the way our forbears did in times past, and maybe that is what recreation is all about <—–<<

Archived by

ARCHERYTALK.COM

all rights reserved

2 votes, average: 1.00 out of 52 votes, average: 1.00 out of 52 votes, average: 1.00 out of 52 votes, average: 1.00 out of 52 votes, average: 1.00 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 1.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by osnapchuckie on 18 Feb 2010

Hoyt USA Vantage Bow Set $475

This is a complete set, Tuned and Ready to go.
Hoyt Vantage Ultra sport model bow: Draw weight 50-70lbs, i believe its 80% let off. 27-30 Inch Draw. Cam and a 1/2 setup. New strings, kept waxed.
Simple target rest, Limb Savers, silencers, stabilizer, True glo quick adjust target site, Quick release quiver.
With Full set of carbon hunting and target arrows and hard case.
Bow is tuned and shows it. Bow is priced at  $600 for the bow alone…

Price is $475.00

Please email me at: osnapchuckie@hotmail.com

Located in Port Huron, MI 48060

Hoyt USA Vantage Bow Set

0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 50 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by slider37 on 31 Jan 2010

2008 Martin Bengal For Sale

Hey guys

This bow is the 2008 Model of a Martin Bengal. 

 

As you can see the bow comes in Camo color and is currently set to a 28.5 inch draw length.  The bow weight can be set anywhere form 40 – 70 lbs and has a draw length capability of 25 – 30 inches.

 

The sight and rest that you see on the bow do not come with it.  It would come with a Cobra Boomslang LT 3 pin fibre optic sight as well as a standard whisker biscuit rest.

 

The bow is in excellent condition and shoots straight X’s, I’m simply interested in trying something new. 

 

I am located in Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada, and I am looking for around $600 for the bow.  Please contact me for more details or to discuss priceing.

 

Wayne

1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Published by admin on 18 Jan 2010

2010: Aspirinbusting 25 Years by frank addington, jr.

2010: Aspirinbusting 25 Years
by frank addington, jr.


 
         It is hard to believe that 25 years ago  the late Rev. Stacy Groscup tossed a Pepsi can into mid air and challenged me to hit it.  I did and that same day he put me in front of an audience and had me shooting at aerial targets.   I’d actually assisted Stacy on stage for years by tossing targets for him from time to time.  Ann Clark  also had me assist her when she visited the West Virginia Sport show around 1981.  Those early experiences with Ann & Stacy let me know I’d found my calling.  I wanted to make a living shooting a bow and arrow.  It’s the only thing I wanted to do.
      The shows have come full circle since that time and I have evolved into performing  my own shows.  When I first started I basically imitated Stacy’s show, the same shots and the same script.   I soon came to realize that there was only one Stacy and as my confidence grew I began designing my own show and my own shots.  That’s part of how the behind the back shots came into play.  I wanted to break new ground and do some shots that had never been attempted in front of crowds before.  I wanted to rewrite the books on exhibition shooting with some of the shots I’d attempt.  Some worked, some didn’t.  I kept the good ones and forgot the others.  I once fired two bows at once in California— and hit both targets with two arrows.  That was a crazy shot!  I couldn’t do that shot often, when you consider that shooting twin 45# bows meant I was really pulling 90#. 
      I’ve written about some lucky shots I’ve done before, including the long distance shot in Union Grove, NC in 1988.   I won’t revisit that tale now but I would be lying if I said that 80-90 yard shot wasn’t luck!  Sometimes there’s a fine line between luck and skill.  I Am always happy when luck is on my side.  I’d like to think all my first shot shows on baby are 100% skill but I must admit sometimes luck plays a part. 
      2010 will mark my 39th year shooting a bow and arrow.  Crazy huh?  It’s hard to believe I’ve been flinging arrows that long.  It’s been so long that I really don’t ever remember not shooting a bow.  I have made many friends during that 39 years in the sport.  Fred Bear, Earl and Ann Hoyt, Stacy Groscup, and so many others.  Sadly, many of these legends are gone.  Fortunately we have some icons left, like Chuck Adams. Ted Nugent, and many, many more.  My son Gus, 3, has been shooting a bow since he was about 18 months old.  I had to help him but he loved it.  I was glad to see a third generation Addington come along that enjoyed archery!
      Many of the folks I have shared seminar stages with when I started have moved on, retired or passed away.  I miss many of them.  I’ve met some unforgettable characters in this business, that’s for sure.  My equipment has changed over the years.  When I very first started I used a wooden Bear Kodiak recurve bow.  I have a special blonde colored Bear Kodiak Fred Bear signed and sent me that I never put a string on.  I remember his shoulders rocking with laughter when I told him I was hitting aspirin with one of his bows.  He smiled and said, “I thought I was doing good when I used to hit coins…”  I have some photos Dick Mauch shared with me of Fred on stage doing exhibitions.  Fred used to trade these shows for booth space when he first started out. 
     In the mid 1980’s I would join Hoyt/Easton’s Advisory staff.  There I’d meet folks like a serious bowhunter named Chuck Adams.  He climbed the ladder quickly and was one of the hardest working men in the sport.  Driven and focused on what he wanted, he became the first to obtain the famous “Super Slam” by bagging one of all 27 big game species in North America.  Chuck has lasted all these years because he has worked for his position, he doesn’t cut corners and he plays by the rules.  We remain good friends and I was delighted when Chuck agreed to write the forward for my book when it finally comes out.  Some may be jealous of Chuck’s fame or position but he put in the hours and the sweat to become the sport’s most successful bowhunter. 
      During my time at Hoyt I held various positions, including Gold Staff member, and a one man member of a term Eric Dally made up, “Promotional Pro Staff.”  I left Hoyt in 2003 and shot Mathew’s Sky recurves beginning in 2003.   2004 was a wild year for my shows, we even ended up doing an exhibition on behalf of the President of the United States, George W. Bush.  “Old Blue” is the Sky bow I used for 6 years.  I had newer bows from Sky including two Mathews prototype bows that were never launched to the public, but I remained true to “Old Blue.”  It was a great shooting bow.
       July 1, 2009 I returned home to Hoyt.  Mike Luper and I had talked and I knew that it would be great to work with Mike again.  He knows the archery industry and has a knack for promotional efforts and promoting the sport and Hoyt.  He thinks out of the box.  I have a great deal of respect and admiration for Mike and I am glad to be back working with him.  For 2010 I will be shooting twin Formula RX bows.  I am just now getting them ready for our new show season.  If they shoot as good as they look the baby aspirin are in trouble.  Here’s the website, check out these bows for yourself:
 
   http://www.hoytrecurve.com/recurve_bows/hoyt_formula_recurve_bow.php
 
       My how bows have changed since 1971!  My first bow was a fiberglass stick with a string.  It’s funny that I use the same shooting style now that I used way back then!  Instinctive shooting has been good to me.  I am thankful my father set me up that way.  He still sets up every bow that I perform with on stage.  I always am quick to say I have the very pit crew in archery with Pop!  I can set up my own equipment but prefer he does it.
        His retail shop, Addington’s Bowhunter Shop, turns 32 this year!  If you visit you’ll find a shop full of vintage photos, hunts he has made all over, signed photos from folks like country singer George Strait (he set up a Hoyt for Strait in the 1990’s),  and an indoor range full of full mounted animals.  I also have a display of my show bows.  I have kept at least one of every bow I’ve ever used on stage the past 25 years and have them on display.  We are working on an additional display which will have some special Stacy Groscup items in it.  One visit to the shop and you’ll see why my parents love the sport so much.  They have bowhunted together all of my life and have a lifetime of memories and photos on display.  By the way, Mom has taken 17 or 18 bear with her bow! 
        During the past 25 years I’ve seen countless airports, hotel rooms, thousands of miles of highway, and met lots of new friends.  For the 25 year mark I have some new shots up my sleeve.  You will have to catch our show this year to see what we have planned!  I feel very blessed to have been able to perform at a professional level 25 straight years.  However, I am just getting started. A few years ago I saw that my friend Ted Nugent always had cool names for his rock and roll tour each year, so I dubbed my tour the HAVE BOW WILL TRAVEL tour.  Catchy huh? 
 
Until next time, Adios & God Bless.

Shoot Straight,
Frank
 
www.frankaddingtonjr.com

 

Bad Behavior has blocked 800 access attempts in the last 7 days.