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Archive for June, 2010

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Published by JEFF METHENEY on 30 Jun 2010

2009 Martin Cheetah with lifetime Warranty for sale.

I have a 2009 Martin Cheetah RH bow for sale still has lifetime warranty and I have upgraded the bow with a STS and CCS. Reply if interested.

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Published by Game Glide on 29 Jun 2010

Top 7 Articles about Preseason Exercise for Deer Hunters

From GameGlide blog

Silhouette of a manTop 7 Articles about Preseason Exercise for Deer Hunters

This post started as an update to my post titled, “Are you physically ready for deer season?” While writing the update, I decided to make it a standalone and more complete post by compiling much of the best hunting training and exercise information that I have found.

Soon it will be summer and you will be thinking about ways to keep cool, such as fishing and swimming and not about exercise. So, I wanted to get this post out to you, so that you can do some leisurely reading and begin you non-leisurely work out before it gets too hot.

As for me, deer hunting and preseason exercise do not usually go hand in hand. Now that I am getting older (and hopefully wiser), I am starting to think about creative ways to become more fit, especially for deer season. One of the main reasons that I am interested in this is that we often hunt in Greene County, PA. This area is known for very steep hills and great deer hunting (of course!). So, needless to say we have to do a lot of walking up and down these steep hills during the season.

When I think of our successful hunts in Greene County, I always remember being out of breath and sweating like a fiend when we drag the deer out of the hills. Did you know that when deer hunting you can easily be carrying over 50lbs of gear when you go out into the woods? Next imagine carrying all that gear and having to drag a trophy whitetail deer out from your secret stand that’s over 1/2 mile away from your truck or camp. This is no place to have a heart attack. Physical health and fitness are essential for an enjoyable, safe deer hunt. Even beyond the safety aspect, physical health and fitness can make you a better hunter and even a better shooter as described in some of the articles listed below.hunting-exercise

  1. Getting Fit – Better Hunting by DuckBuckGoose a Pro Hunter’s Journal author

DuckBuckGoose wrote a great article “Getting Fit – Better Hunting” on this subject. He offers great details and advice on how and why to lose the weight prior to deer season and he provides guidance about how to set tangible goals. Plus, he has a great use of the word, “svelte” in his article! “Svelte” is way too underutilized in hunting blogs!

DuckBuckGoose provides a great summary of why getting fit is important for hunting for him: “One of my goals is to be a better hunter this year than I was last year. One of the ways I want to accomplish that is by losing weight – so I can move more efficiently and quietly through my hunting ground, and leave less scent in the air by not having to breath as hard. Plus, by losing weight I know I’ll have more energy, look better, feel better and possibly even get more years to hunt down the road.”

2. Off Season Training for Buck Fever by Mark Keynon (Twitter @WiredToHunt) posted at Wired to Hunt

Mark provides a really cool video in his blog post: Off Season Training for Buck Fever. In the video, he offers a great suggestion to help simulate buck fever, while practicing shooting your bow. Personally, I have never experienced buck fever, so I will just take his word for it (I am joking, of course!). The video is well worth the watch. I have embedded the video at the bottom of this post. I will have to try his training suggestion. I am a bit older than he, so I will need a lot more cardio.

3. Hunting Fitness by Craig Neace posted at Hunting Net.com (Twitter @HuntingNet)

Craig begins his training on Memorial Day weekend. He uses this early start to scout, set up trail cams, check his equipment, and to begin shooting his bow. He suggests some off season exercise routines. Craig points out that he weighed himself one day with gear and discovered that he was carrying 57 pounds of hunting equipment with him!

Craig points out that in the Volunteer Hunters Study , an amazing study by the Department Lacrosse Exercise and Health Program, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, the researchers found that “during the dragging test, the heart rates of the men jumped to as high as 180 beats a minute, about 95% of their maximum heart rate, after just five minutes of dragging. Their breathing rates exceeded their ventilatory thresholds, meaning that they were taking in oxygen faster than they could use it.”

Craig notes that “It seems like everything I’ve read lately talks about how heart attacks are the biggest killer among hunters, even more than careless hunting practices. Things like falls, being in remote areas, environmental stresses (heat, cold, wind, rain or snow), body abuse, heavy clothes, greater load and poor diet can all contribute to heart attacks. With all the gear we carry and dragging out a deer can cause more stress than the heart can handle. … Plus, hunting is so much more fun and safer when you’re not tired or out of breathe. It’s like any other sport; you play better if you are in shape.”

4. Hunting Preparation Is More Than Just Equipment from CreatingTheLuck.com

The author notes that many hunters pay very close attention to their exhaustive gear checks and endless checklists, but often neglects their physical fitness checks. He points out that good fitness can provide you with a “higher tolerance to climbing mountains and a higher degree of cold tolerance as well. This is one facet that many hunters neglect to consider in their preparation. cold-weather-mountain-hunting

If a hunter is in good shape, he tends to tolerate the cold better.” At CreatingTheLuck, they have also created some hunting fitness videos. I have not viewed or reviewed the videos, so I cannot comment on them.

5. Hunting Fitness Program Getting Fit For Deer Season posted at DeerHuntingBigBucks.com

In this article, the author suggests getting a physical by a doctor before beginning the exercise routine. I think that this is a great idea, since it can reduce the chances of surprises. He points out that we are not always the most health conscience at deer camp so he suggests getting in shape well beforehand. He suggests a mix of cardio, jogging, and lifting weights.

6. My Fitness | Backcountry Mule Deer Hunting Basics by David Dukat from Fitness.Body-money.com

David’s article relates mainly to mule deer hunting, but a lot of information can also apply to whitetail deer hunting too. He notes when preparing for a mule deer hunt to be in the best shape of your life or at least the best shape you have been in the last five years. Wow! I got some work to do to get there!

7. Physical Fitness and Quality Hunting by James Altiere at OutdoorAlabama.com

In this article James (a Regional Hunter Education Coordinator in Alabama) notes that some of the hunting seasons in Alabama start in the heat of late summer. So, being in shape is critical in the heat. This is something that I hadn’t thought of, since we usually do not experience much of that intense heat during hunting up here in PA, but I am sure some of my readers have to consider this too.

He comments, “physical fitness is a requirement to make hunting more enjoyable. Physical fitness levels in hunters are personal responsibilities and fitness and health change with age. To be a safe and responsible hunter you must know your limitations. And remember, hunting is a recreation to be enjoyed, not a competition to be won.”

Thanks for reading,

Jason @GameGlide

Wired To Hunt: Off Season Training for Buck Fever from Mark Kenyon on Vimeo.

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Published by admin on 24 Jun 2010

Outdoors Magazine Online Poll

Ted Nugent Tied With Benoit BrothersRight-click here to download pictures. To help protect your privacy, Outlook prevented automatic download of this picture from the Internet.

With a week remaining in Outdoors Magazine’s online poll Ted Nugent and the Benoit Brothers are running neck and neck when it comes to the public selecting their favorite hunting personality. Each has received a 23% rating.

Rounding out the Top-10 in the poll are Michael Waddell (13%), Charles Alsheimer (9%), Hal Blood (8%), Larry Weishuhn (8%), Ralph & Vicki Cianciarulo (7%), Tiffany Lakosky (7%), Bill Jordan, Dan Schmidt, and the Drury Brothers are all tied for 10th place with 5%.

Other names mentioned in the polls who have received less than 5% are: R.G. Bernier, Bob Foulkrod, Tom Miranda, Lee Lakosky, Neil Dougherty, Cindy Garrison, Toxey Haas, Cameron Hanes, Haley Heath, Bob Humphrey, Chris Bracket, Stan Potts & Dick Scorzafava.

“We are absolutely fascinated by the poll results so far,” said James Austin, the president of Elk Publishing. “Some of the names we though would surely be leading have received less than 5%, while others have done much better than anticipated. It is funny to see things like how Tiffany is blowing away Lee in the vote,” he said.

The second half of the poll asks five questions directed at the way television portrays hunting. One of these questions is, “Do you buy hunting products that your favorite personality promotes?”  Only 22% of the audience answered in a favorable way, while 64% said, “Occasionally, it is not one of my primary considerations.” A surprising 14% answered “Never. Celebrity endorsement erode the product’s credibility.”

“Some of the comments are also spectacular,” said Austin. “I can’t wait to print them in the next issue of Outdoors Magazine. They really support what we have suspected, that the American public wants to see real situations … only many of our readers have put it in a much more ‘colorful’ way.”

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Published by kevin jubb on 21 Jun 2010

arrow vanes

hi just starting to put new vanes on my arrows and i want to know what is better putting 3 vanes 4″long on the arrow or 4 vanes 4″ long
what will give better grouping

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Published by admin on 15 Jun 2010

1st Annual Old West Invitational Turkey Shoot Held in Hulett, Wyoming by Frank Addington, jr.

1st Annual Old West Invitational Turkey Shoot Held in Hulett, Wyoming
by Frank Addington, jr.

“The mission of the Wildlife Heritage Foundation of Wyoming is to create an enduring natural legacy for future generations through stewardship of all Wyoming’s wildlife.”
 
That mission statement is on the Wildlife Heritage Foundation of Wyoming’s website.   I was familiar with their work and when an invitation to participate in their first ever “Old West Invitational Turkey Shoot” came from my pal Dave Lockman, I absolutely said “Yes.”  I thoroughly believe in the work the foundation does to promote shooting sports and hunting to the next generation.   It is a program that many states should follow to ensure future generations follow our tracks into the outdoors.  We must be good stewards of the land and pass that along to the next generation.  
 
Dave Lockman is involved with the Weatherby Foundation International, which provides seed money to help non profit EXPOS around the country.  These Expos are a great way to recruit families and the next generation into the shooting and Hunting Sports.  So  the goals of the Weatherby Foundation and the WHF are very similar. I’ve long been an advocate of the EXPO concept and I first became aware of the WHF while attending an Expo in Casper, Wyoming. 
 
The One Shot Turkey Hunt was the first annual event and I was honored to be the first bowhunter invited.  So when I put the team together I asked my father and family friend Jim Wynne to join me.  We were the only bowhunters at the “first shot” event,  everyone else would be using a shotgun.  The town of Hulett’s population is about 400 give or take a few people, and this little western town was full of good folks.  The event took place near Devil’s Tower and thanks to president Teddy Roosevelt who made it our country’s first national monument.  I could see Devil’s Tower each morning from where our blind was set up, what a beautiful view.

Hunter’s would have special opportunities to attend banquets, social events and other activities during the two day hunt.   Highlights of the trip for me included meeting former Wyoming Governor Sullivan.  The former Governor even bought my breakfast at the Ponderosa restaurant in town.  He got an invite to come to West Virginia and I hope he’ll visit.  I also met many local folks from the area that I enjoyed visiting with including Mr. Jim Neiman, who owns a local sawmill business and golf course. Mr. Neiman is 80 years young and acts 40.  I really enjoyed talking with him.  I also was honored to spend some time talking to Jack Scarlett, who has been involved with the famed One Shot Antelope Hunt in Wyoming.  Turns out Fred and Henrietta Bear were friends of Mr. Scarlett’s family and Fred had been to his ranch to hunt.  Mr. Scarlett and I shared some Fred Bear anecdotes and stories and I really had a great time talking with him.  He was a mutual friend of Dave Lockman’s.  I’ve found that just about anyone that’s a friend of Dave’s is “good people”.  
 
My father and Jim Wynne joined me to make up our “archery team”.   We stayed with Dave Lockman out at the bunk house at the Solitude Ranch.  There was a bath house, cook shack with a lounge area with satellite TV, and a grill on the deck.  Dave and Janet Lockman brought a special request for me… an order of Rocky Mountain Oysters.  We warmed them in the microwave and enjoyed them with homemade hamburgers one day.  I laughed as Jim Wynne and Pop tried this delicacy for the first time.   Dave got me hooked on them many years ago in Casper, Wyoming at Poor Boys.  I’ve had them in Denver, Colorado at the Buckhorn, at Cattleman’s Cut in Montana.  and at Cattleman’s in the Oklahoma City Stockyards.   If you have never tried them I would suggest you do so when in cowboy country.   They are great when properly prepared.
 
Jim bought a target on the way to Hulett so that we could take some warm up shots in camp.  Mid day that first day I warmed up with a few shots.   I put a dandelion on the target walked back to 20 yards.   As an instinctive shooter I wanted to see how my new Hoyt Vantage LTD was shooting.  I had the bow set down to 52# for this hunt and was shooting Easton arrows with Muzzy 145 grain heads.  I prefer a side quiver to a bow quiver and use a vintage Chuck Adams leather side quiver, circa 1992 or so.   I removed an arrow from my quiver, drew the bow and when my pointer finger touched the corner of my mouth I released the arrow.   I saw yellow fly everywhere as the Muzzy head shaved the dandelion in two.  I shot one more arrow at the target and decided that I was ready for a turkey if the right shot presented itself.  I think the guide was shocked when he didn’t see a sight on my bow.
 
Our guide knew the Solitude ranch and had us in birds right off opening morning.  However, the old boss gobbler wouldn’t come closer.  He stayed out about 40 yards.  The guide had only brought a slate call and really didn’t fool with diaphragm calls or box calls.  Luckily Pop had a turkey vest full of calls and decoys.  He would also call in some birds during the two days.  We hunted hard for the two days and called from a blind and also did a few quick set ups while doing some afternoon spot and stalks.   On the second morning we were in a different set up.  The birds came in but the two gobblers stayed out about 40 yards again.  This time after they left I discovered the problem— an old fence line that you could not see in early light.  
 
While the guide napped pop and I still hunted down the ridge and set up on four gobblers.  Pop was working the birds when two hens ran in and left taking all four of the gobblers with them.    Having hunted eastern turkey most of my life, typically you can call the hen in and she will bring the gobblers with her.  In Wyoming, these merriam gobblers seemed a little easier to hunt but the hens were the problem.  Several times a jealous hen would run in and take the gobblers away when she left.  None of the three of us bowhunters drew a bow in the two days.  We all agreed that it would have been nice to have had another day or two but the hunt ended with a big banquet Saturday night.
 
This was a “one shot” hunt, meaning you only get one shot.  If you missed or if the turkey required a second shot you were disqualified from the competition.  Scoring was based on the weight, beard length doubled, and spur length doubled.    I believe about 39 birds were bagged out of aprx. 70 hunters.  There were smiles every where Saturday night so I believe everyone had a great time.  I was impressed when I saw companies like Remington play such a large supporting role in this hunt.  They provided about 17 guns for the event and ammunition.  The two youngest hunters on the team received free shotguns.  A special presentation was also made to a young man who had recently lost his grandfather, who had promised to take the young man turkey hunting.  His grandfather had just passed away and would not be taking the youngster hunting.  When this young man was presented a gun and an opportunity to be taken hunting, there wasn’t a dry eye in the room. I really appreciate companies like Remington and Weatherby who give back to try and ensure hunting is passed on to future generations. 
 
This event wasn’t really about the “celebrities”.  It was about seeing these youngsters encouraged and recognized.  To me they were the real celebrities of the weekend.  I appreciate all that the WHF,  supporting businesses and companies, and volunteers did to make this first time event a huge success.  It was a great time and if you get an invitation to support or attend this event, please do so.  They are doing good things in Wyoming and I was proud to be the first archer invited.   If you do go, take some warm clothes for the early Wyoming mornings, a camera for the views, and be ready to meet some fine folks. 

Although a dandelion is all I had bagged in two days of hunting,  my hunt was a huge success.  Like Fred Bear, to me the success of a hunt isn’t always measured by the game taken.  I’d been able to spend valuable time with my father bowhunting, hang out with old pals Jim Wynne, Dave and Janet Lockman, and meet a bunch of new friends.  I enjoyed good food and good company and breath taking views.  I’d seen a huge amount of gobblers, a coyote, countless whitetail deer, mule deer, antelope and other game. My dandelion would have to serve as my trophy until my next adventure into the Black Hills of Wyoming.  I hope one day to take my son Gus there to see the sights and meet the people.  He’s only three but one day soon he’ll be old enough to join me.  I hope he’ll enjoy time with me as much as I enjoyed hunting with my father.
 
Thanks Hulett, Wyoming. I’ll be back.
 
***************************************************************************************************************************************************
 
 It is clear that the Wildlife Heritage Foundation of Wyoming is dedicated to promoting hunting and wise use of our natural resources to the next generation.   To learn more, please visit:
 
Special thanks to Dave and Janet Lockman, Hoyt, Muzzy, Robinson Outdoors, Easton and my other sponsors.  Also, thanks to the WHF, Solitude ranch, and every one of the staff and volunteers for this event. 

Visit my show website at:

Thanks for reading.  Until next time, Adios and God Bless.
Shoot Straight,
Frank
 
Frank Addington, Jr.
The Aspirin Buster

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Published by admin on 14 Jun 2010

PORKMANDO by Ted Nugent

 

PORKMANDO 
by Ted Nugent
 
I stink. I mean really, really stink, like ultra PU bad. There is a putrid, rank musky essence to my very being that repels all living things, except other stinky things. And what really stinks, I actually like it. You see, I just ambushed, killed, gutted, dragged, photographed and heaved a most beautiful four hundred plus pound nasty mud soaked, urine saturated monster Austrian boar out of my rain soaked forest in Michigan, then hugged the beast lovingly for photos, then I helped lift him onto my truck bed and hang his bloody carcass in my Polar King walk in cooler for the night. I am one, bloody, muddy, sweaty, soaked, stinky happy bowhunting idiot, and I couldn’t be happier. I love bowhunting for wild boar, and tonight was the night of nights. I can hardly stand myself. I smell wild.
 
It all came about rather abruptly as I was unpacking my bowhunting safari gear from a nonstop global bowhunting dream excursion that took me to South Africa for plains game, back to Ontario, Canada for another black bear, up to the glorious wilds of Northern Wisconsin for a giant whitetail and back to my ancestral Michigan swamplands for the continuing backstrap saga.
 
Still dizzy with a sense of drained exhaustion, I figured there was no way I could hunt today due to the heavy rains pelting my pole barn since early morning. As I stepped to the barn door to shoot some arrows from my new Martin AlienX compound bow, I was surprised to see a patch of lighter sky and a temporary halt to the rainstorm. Aha! An opening to go for it!
 
I immediately called BigJim, my main VidCamDude for our Spirit of the Wild TV show, and the hunt was on.
 
We tossed bows, arrows, boots, camo, vidcams and raingear into the truck and put the peddle to the metal Baja’ing for the old Nugent family game rich hunting grounds at Sunrize Acres in Jackson County, Michigan. It had been months since I had been there, and I was hankering for a hopeful rendezvous with our amazing pure Austrian wild boar that run wild there. My last three hunts there were porkless, and I was determined to end my skunking on my own wild boar preserve. It didn’t make sense. I have owned and hunted this incredible piece of southern Michigan farm country for more than forty years, knew it intimately, loved it wildly and knew it was just a matter of time before I picked the right place at the right time.
 
Though there are those ignorant loonies who refer to game preserves as “canned hunts”, those of us with any experience at all know all too well how foolish such an assumption is. Hogs are hogs and hunting is always hunting. Fact of the matter is, my hunting journals prove that far more hog killing opportunities have occurred on unfenced hog grounds in Texas, Georgia, Florida, California and Hawaii than on Sunrize Acres. There is no fair chase. The hogs cheat.
Jim and I chose a double ladderstand at the edge of a woodland waterhole where we had planted a variety of food plot seeds along the eroded banks. The entire shoreline of the pond was rooted up, tracked up and wollowed up. It was clearly hog heaven.
 
We chummed up the best shooting locations with C’Mere Deer and Three Day Harvest bait, then settled in hoping the rain would hold off till after dark.
 
Three hours later I was figuring my skunking would continue, when Jim tapped me on the shoulder and pointed to the open fields to the east where plenty of daylight remained.
 
Even at 75 yards it was evident that this was one amazing boar. The beast stood like a defiant, grizzled statue looking into the darker woods, then would take a few cautious steps before pausing to examine his domain again. As the giant hog approached the edge of the woods, he began rubbing his long, silver and brindled coat on a maple sapling, causing the four inch tree to wobble violently, the leafy canopy shaking back and forth to the rhythm of the pigs torqueing mass. At forty yards, he paused again, then slowly ambled to the edge of the mud for a noisy slurp of water.
 
I was poised for a shot if he gave it to me, but fortunately after a few guzzles of murky pond scum he headed our way with his nose full of C’Mere Deer. Luck turned bad as the huge boar fed directly behind the tree for what seemed forever, offering no shot whatsoever. Light was fading and time was running out. Jim filmed, I waited.
 
I very quietly asked Jim if he still had decent vidcam light when the beautiful pig turned slowly to its right and began to walk off. As is nearly always the case, he stopped again with a large tree covering his vitals. Jim filmed, I waited.
 
Instantly he took a step forward clearing the tree and I drew back my arrow, picked a spot and let er rip in a flash. Speaking of flash, the tracer round light trail of my Lumenok was a beautiful thing to behold in the misty dusk of the dark woods, as my arrow zipped across the 35 yards and sliced into the boar’s left hip, angling hard into his chest.
 
With a squeal and a deep grunt, he sprung into action as I nocked my second arrow just as swiftly. He floundered at his rubbing tree where my second arrow intercepted him midship, the glowing Lumenok’s telltale impact clearly visible.
 
It all happened so fast, I wasn’t sure if either arrow was on course for a double lung kill shot, so Jim and I climbed down and tip toed to where the second arrow connected. As I picked up arrow number two by the glowing Lumenok, I simultaneously saw and heard the boar just 20 yards ahead as it flopped his last flop in the deep weeds and grasses just outside the forest edge.
I was ecstatic! The beast is dead long live the beast! Jim and I danced a little pig jig for a not so little pig, dragged the behemoth out into the clearing, and paid our last respects for this gorgeous runaway BBQ locomotive on the hoof on film.
 
This old warrior was the essence of wild boarness. Over 400 pounds, long, gnarly, course silver, grey and calico hairs, deep heavy chest, long narrow hips with a elongated snout, singing, rangy tail and some pretty handsome ivory protruding from his prehistoric proboscis. And of the defining factor for all pigdom-the nostril flaring aroma of the whole ordeal.
 
Here’s the not so stinky part: even though this old boar was so ugly he was beautiful, and the olfactory stimuli was for true swine lovers only, do not think for a moment that all this adds up to unpalatable table fare. On the contrary, it is my personal experience and that of hundreds upon hundreds of fellow hog hunters I have guided and or hunted with myself, that even from these old bruisers, the pork is delicious.
 
I gutted him thoroughly, hosed him out clean, hung him by the snout in my Polar King cooler overnight so that all blood and fluids drained completely out of him, skinned him carefully, removing every last hair from the carcass, then took him to Joe Nagle, a gung-ho dedicated professional butcher in Homer, Michigan, where the beast was lovingly and ultra cleanly cut up into family sized portions with tender loving care.
 
Clean and cold is IT for quality BBQ pork my friends. Most of the white fat is trimmed off the meat, but wild pork fat is clean, organic and sweet, so don’t trim it all off, do keep some on for cooking ease and flavor. The rewards on the grill are so worth the effort we put forth when we hunt hard for those always thrilling hunting encounters.
 
To book a hunt for a pure Austrian wild boar, visit tednugent.com or contact SUNRIZE SAFARIS at 517-750-9060.
 
On this hunt, Ted used his Martin Rytera AlienX bow set at 50#, a 400 grain GoldTip Nuge arrow tipped with a 100 grain Magnus BuzzCut 4 blade, Sims LimbSavers, sight, drop away arrow rests and accessories, Scott release, Bushnell optics, Mossy Oak ScentLok clothing, Boggs rubber boots, Old Man ladderstand, Hunter Safety System vest, Code Blue scents, C’Mere Deer powder and 3 Day Harvest, Outdoor Edge SwingBlade, Glenn’s Deer Handle, Polar King cooler, Bad Boy buggy.

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Published by HeadsOrTails on 11 Jun 2010

Bow Press Last Chance Archery

Slightly used like new, 6 months old
EBAY sells for 730 plus shipping

The EZ Press (electric) is designed for quick and easy set-up of all compound bows.
The EZ Press components are machined for smooth and easy operation.
The EZ Press is what you need for higher draw weight bows.
Comes with standard bench of wall mount.

Asking $625
443-244-5440 Tim

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Published by Sherry Lee on 09 Jun 2010

North East Archery Deer & Predator Extravaganza

Randy Oitker

See Randy Perform Live!

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Published by SupermanClassic10 on 07 Jun 2010

Superman Classic Tournament

                                                 Hello friends!

Metropolis Tourism is happy to share some exciting news with you. We have adjusted our payout schedule for the Metropolis Superman Classic to include a higher accumulative prize payout in 2010!

Over $15,000 in prize money to be awarded!

$300 (instead of $100) will be awarded to the 3-day high scorer in each class.

The tournament will be held June 22-24 at Mermet Fish and Wildlife Area in southernmost Illinois, a favorite site for many competitors. We want to extend a personal invitation to you to participate all three days to increase your possible prize money. Daily awards will be paid in each class: $125 for 1st, $100 for 2nd and $75 for 3rd. (Note: The number of places paid each day will be determined by the number of shooters in each class.)

The cost to shoot all three days is just $20!
That’s quite a bargain for three days of fun and friendly competition!

Plus you’ll get in lots of practice for the ASA Illinois Pro-Am Shoot that follows.

Harrah’s Metropolis Casino will again sponsor a reception on Friday evening, June 25 for all who participate in the Superman Classic. If you attended last year, you know this was a great free treat for everyone!

For More Information on the Superman Classic Archery Tournament go to metropolis tourism.com

-On this website: there is a link on the left hand side called “Archery Tournament” –

Hope to see you all there!

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Published by adam_alaska on 04 Jun 2010

hunting bear

now this year was my first year hunting with my bow. i have a 2009 diamond razor with, shooting g5 broadheads and gold tip arrows. now im pulling 58 lbs and was confident when i went out to my bait station hunting for black bear this spring, but to my dismay hit the bear and did not get a blood trail due to the arrow not making it all the way through. now am i crazy or do i feel like my arrow grain is to small? its all new to me so any advice would help

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