Archive for September, 2011

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Published by admin on 22 Sep 2011

Archery’s loss Heaven’s gain… Dick Lattimer passes

Straight Shot
with frank addington, jr.

Archery’s loss Heaven’s gain… Dick Lattimer passes

I got sad news this evening via email from my friend Dick Mauch. It seems that we have lost another member of our archery family with the passing of Dick Lattimer around 3AM on the morning of Tuesday, September 6, 2011. Dick was a great man and did so much for the sport of archery. Most everyone knows how close Dick was to the late Fred Bear, whom he worked for over 20 years. Although he handled advertising and PR for Bear, he and Fred seemed to me to have a close knit bond like a father-son relationship. He helped usher in the boom in archery the sport had in the 1970’s by promoting the Bear campaign, “Become a two season hunter.” When you saw Fred at a public event in the 1970’s until his passing, Dick was usually at his side camera and notepad in hand.

In addition to a career at Bear, Dick was also heavily involved in AMO, and authored at least four books, one on space, one on Jesus, and the two books, “I remember Papa Bear” and “Hunt with Fred Bear.” He was also involved with the Archery Hall of Fame and other archery related organizations. Although I never met her, his emails to me often mentioned his wife Alice, who survives Dick. We had a running joke because I often did summer shows in Florida, and Dick & his wife would be in Indiana for the summer and then in the winter when I did the Indiana show Dick and Alice would be back in Florida. I would often tease Dick for avoiding me and my show. It became a running joke. Dick had a great sense of humor.

In the coming days I am sure there will much written about this fine man. He is an archery Hall of Fame member and did so much for our sport. I am reminded of the story about the great western actor Ben Johnson. Johnson won an Oscar for his role in “The Last Picture Show” before John Wayne won his Oscar for True Grit. Yet even while Johnson had an Oscar, and at the time Duke did not, Johnson often had roles that had him playing John Wayne’s sidekick. One reporter once asked if that didn’t bother Johnson being such an accomplished actor and yet playing second fiddle to Wayne, Johnson is supposed to have replied, “Somebody has to hold the horses….” That was Dick Lattimer. He never seemed to mind helping shine the spotlight on Fred Bear, Bear Archery and the sport of archery. He was always behind the scenes, running a camera, video camera, or banging out words on a typewriter. In my book Dick was as good as they come.

I thanked him a just a few years ago for not running me off as a kid when I would bug Fred at shows. He could have and yet never did. As a matter of fact, I still have an envelope of photos Dick sent me of Fred and I at an event. He mailed them to me a few weeks after the show. During the event, my parent’s and I had attended a big fancy private party Fred hosted in Atlanta during the SHOT SHOW. We stayed till the end and walked down the hall as Fred and Dick left the party. I snapped a photo of the two of them walking down the hall together, the hero and his trusty sidekick. Now days I view them both as heroes. I see that it was Dick who often was behind the scenes helping steer the media and image of Fred and Bear Archery.

His eulogy “It was quiet in the forest” that he wrote and read at Fred’s service was one of the most beautiful eulogies I’d ever seen. Although I didn’t attend the service, he sent me a big packet of stuff shortly after Fred’s service which had a copy of that eulogy in it. He was thoughtful like that because he knew just how much I loved and admired Fred. Dick was often selfless and always thinking of others. Anyway, perhaps that’s a fitting end for our friend Dick, because once again the crow has come to tell us of the death of that giant Bear’s great and trusted friend. The Forest is again quiet.. So long Dick, we’ll miss you. Thanks again…….. our sad loss is now Heaven’s gain.

Frank Addington, Jr.

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Published by cgbrun2 on 20 Sep 2011

New for this year !!!

Bought a new in the box 2010 Martin Firecat TR2 bow for my birthday ! And what a nice bow it turned out to be ! Light,balanced, and supper fast ! A very forgiveing, flat shooting bow that hits hard and sinks em deep ! And tuneing the bow was a snap ! I know that Martin has to come up with new inovations to keep up with the other bow manufactures, but as far as I’m concerned, they hit the bullseye with this bow ! The one thing that I will say is that whatever bow that you choose to buy,you should buy the bow that fits you and like ! There are a lot of good bows out there. but the one you feel the most comfortable with is the one for you ! I shot 7 different bows before I picked the Martin Firecat TR2. For me, My pholosophy is that the bow is only 10% of the equation ! The other 90% is you !!! Without lots of practice and persistance, it’s just a stick and a string !!!! Have a great season, everyone !!!

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Published by Jeff-NC on 20 Sep 2011

The Worst Deer Hunting Dog

This is not archery related, well not even really deer hunting related but it is still funny!  This is my first post so hopefully I post the video correctly.

World’s Worst Deer Hunting Dog

Enjoy and good luck this season

Jeff

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Published by Lady Artemis on 18 Sep 2011

TALL BOY

Northern Indiana

10/18/2008:

My husband and I were out in our ladder stand overlooking a freshly-cut bean field.  We had taken our video camera with us for the first time.  Just a few minutes before dark, two bucks came out to feed;  one small fork horn and a larger tall-racked one.  The bigger buck spent some time working a scrape and licking branch at the field edge.  We captured about 15 minutes of video before the light faded.

One of the deer was just a stone’s throw away as we carefully climbed down in the dark.  Neither deer spooked when we left, but it made for a nervous trip out knowing they were behind us on the same trail.  Returning home, we watched the video footage we just shot, and wondered if we would see the big buck a.k.a. “Tall Boy” ever again.

10/19/2008:

The next day, I decided on the spur of the moment to hunt our stand again.  My husband was staying home to watch the F1 race, and he thought I could go out hunting for a few hours alone.  The weather was fore-casted to be mild;  50 degrees, light wind and no rain.    By the time I did my normal prep, it was around 3 o’clock before I arrived on stand.  I saw an occasional squirrel or flock of songbirds, but no deer showed up for about 3 hours.

A little after 6 pm, a mature doe and yearling stepped out on the other side of the field.  They fed for a few minutes, then the doe suddenly stared right at me, blowing and stomping her foot.   She pranced around the field and carried on for several minutes, but would not leave.  I froze in the stand, afraid to move or even make eye contact.

Another yearling and a fork horn buck came out into the field.  The little buck immediately began dogging the doe.  The entire group started trotting around the field, doing their best to avoid the young buck.  One by one, all the deer disappeared as the buck chased them into the trees.

With the field now empty and believing I was probably done after the alarm the doe had sounded, I hung up my bow and considered leaving soon.  I slowly let out a deep breath and tried to ease the tension between my shoulders.  Moments later, I glanced over my left shoulder and saw another small buck along with two does.  A few minutes passed, then the small buck looked back at the trees as a big buck stepped out.

Not believing my eyes, I blinked several times to clear my vision and used my binoculars to look at the deer more closely.  Tall Boy had returned!  I again grabbed my bow and quietly waited while the deer slowly worked towards me.  Another doe came out to join the group.  Soon, the whole herd was coming near me to feed on some tender new grass under my stand.  The four other deer were within 20 yards and facing me.  I knew I would have to shoot sitting down with so many deer so close.

Tall Boy walked to within 15 yards and stopped perfectly broadside.  I waited for his front leg to go forward to make for a higher-percentage shot.   I leaned forward, canting and drawing the bow at the same time.   My only opening was thru a large fork in the tree.  In the instant I came to full draw, the deer lifted his head and looked right at me.  Afraid he would jump the string, I aimed low on his chest and released the arrow.

All the deer scattered, running in opposite directions across the bean field.   By the time the others had disappeared, my deer was lagging behind.   He slowed to a walk, then stopped next to the scrape he had worked the day before.   He staggered, then tipped over sideways, disappearing into the trees.   I heard a loud crash, then the woods became completely silent.

It was now about 7:15 pm and I knew that darkness was coming within minutes.   I quickly gathered my gear and climbed out of the tree.   I walked softly over to the last place I had seen the deer and peeked into the woods.   Just 10 feet into the tree line, I saw the white belly and horns of my deer.   He had only ran about 75 yards from where I had shot him.   I went to him and saw that he was not getting up.    My single shot had been all that was necessary.   I laid my hands upon his rack and said a prayer of thanks for this precious gift.

I called my husband with the news and asked for his help recovering the deer.  When he arrived, we discovered the joy of field dressing by headlight and flashlight, not the optimal conditions for sure.  We checked him in the next day, and found his weight to be 180# dressed.


After 7 long years of waiting, with many close encounters and missed opportunities, I have finally harvested my first deer.  He was everything I had ever wanted, truly a deer of my dreams.

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Published by Double s on 09 Sep 2011

Tough Buck Falls

I took this fella around 4 pm on the 2nd in a CRP field. I call him “Tough Buck”. He was bedded down in some sage. I had the wind to my advantage as I made my way to him…slowly. When the wind died down…I stopped…When the wind picked up…I moved. I basically crab walked sideways making sure that I was in Shooting position just in case he heard me and got up. I got to 21 yards and stopped. I had one sage blocking his view of me. I must have ranged the bush he was beside 100 times. I got into shooters position and Yelped at him. I saw his Antlers move left then right…then he got up. I place my 20 yard pin on the right front armpit and fired. I couldn’t even hear the impact because of the wind. He bucked up once and dropped to his front knee’s. I figured this is it….Nope!. He gets back up and trots off away 40 yards and beds down under another sage. It felt like a great shot but I started to second guess myself. I waited about 20 minutes glassing him. I thought he had expired but he picked his head up again, I knew he was wounded bad. With the high heat I couldn’t back out and come back later, the meat would spoil plus i didn’t want him to suffer any more. I slowly made my way toward him again using the same tactics. I got into 20 yards of him again and got into my shooters position. I had a west to east wind and it was picking up. I yelped to him and nothing happened…I yelped again, His antlers moved…He was weak. I finally just yelled. He slowly gets up and I aimed for the same right front armpit again. Fired. I see the impact and the blood blow out. He turns around facing east to try to go uphill to get away from me.,he didn’t make it. He made it about 25 yards east and rolled. I could see all four hoofs up in the air in the sage. A couple of jerks of the hoofs and he expired. My son Arrived as well as a friend to help out. I gutted him out and we used a tarp to drag him out. After I got him skinned out I could see two puncture holes on the right side, the entrance, almost touching. I call him a “Tough Buck”.

He has 6 points on the left side but the eye guard is under the 1 inch rule. So I’m calling it 5.
The right is 4 plus 1 eye guard way over the 1 inch rule. That’s a 5.


Two entrance holes from 2 blade BH. Right side right above the armpit. I have him hanging head down with head already removed.

left side of the pass through

 

Preping for skinning and boiling

Muley Skull almost complete

 

 

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Published by gmoore on 02 Sep 2011

Distance Estimation and Arrow Fall

Arrow FallDistance estimation is important for archers. Without an exact estimate of the range, a hunter could shoot from the improper sight pin and entirely miss the target. Making use of a bow mounted rangefinder removes the estimation of distance, and will provide a hunter more success.

Even unskilled bow hunters know that arrow fall is impacted more as the distance of the shot increases. Modern compound bows are especially fast, and often experience a small amount of arrow drop at ranges within 20 yards.

An arrow will begin to drop at a greater pace at a distance of 30 to 40 yards. This is due to the effect of gravity and a decrease in arrow speed. A poor gauge at distance will limit the chances for success. If you make a poor estimation of the range of a 40 yard shooting opportunity by as little as 5 yards, it can result in an injured deer, or a complete miss. Estimating distance precisely is by far the most significant variable for success in the field.

It is recommended that a bowhunter be aware of what their bow is capable of and be aware of the degree of arrow drop experienced at different distances. Hunting bows are frequently equipped with sights that make use of a few fiber optic sight pins of various colors. Each of these pins are generally sighted in at 10 yard increments from 20 to 50 yards.

Once your bow sights are properly adjusted, you can do a simple test to see how you may miss your shot if you misjudge the range. Lay a paper plate on your target. This is approximately the dimensions of the vital area of an average whitetail deer. Step off or range your target to a distance of 40 yards. Then draw your bow and place your 30 yard pin right in the middle of that paper plate. With your 30 yard pin in the center of the target, examine where that 40 yard pin falls on the target. You will most likely see that your arrow will land short and miss the vital area of the deer. You will probably end up missing the shot, or possibly wounding the deer.

I’ve never attempted a shot on a deer inside 25 yards, and not delivered a fatal shot. There have been a number of missed shots and a few bad shots that only injured my game. Those shooting opportunities were typically at distances near 30 yards or greater. At a range of of 30 to 40 yards, I was never completely confident. It was rare for me to take a shot past 40 yards. It is tough to regain that confidence in the deer stand. There is a big difference between shooting at the archery range at pre-defined distances, and shooting from the treestand with approximated distances. Small miscalculations in range from the deer stand yielded missed shots and diminished confidence.

Making use of a little, hand-held laser rangefinder helped to bring back a lot of the confidence that I had lost. Deer would mostly be on the move as I ranged them though. So there was still some uncertainty by the time I could draw my bow and accurately shoot my arrow.

There are some high tech and low tech products that can correct the issues with distance approximation. The Leupold Vendetta is an electronic bow mounted range finder, and the Dead-on rangefinder is a non-electronic model. So you can easily determine the range to a deer a split second before actually taking your shot, and know that you are selecting the proper sight pin.

 

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