Archive for November, 2013

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Published by admin on 26 Nov 2013

BOWHUNT AMERICA Best of Bill Krenz

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BOWHUNT AMERICA Best of Bill Krenz

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This column celebrates the writing of Bowhunt America Founder Bill Krenz. This piece was originally printed in the June/July 2005 issue of Bowhunt America.

Work on Your Weaknesses
The best way I’ve found to become a more accurate shooter is to work on your weaknesses.

If you’re an NBA basketball fan, you know
who Karl Malone is. Malone, who retired after playing eighteen seasons for the Utah Jazz and one for the Los Angeles Lakers, was one of the greatest power forwards ever. Malone was the league’s MVP in 1997 and 1999, was a 14-time All-Star selection, and finished second on the NBA’s all-time scoring list. Malone could do it all. He could rebound, play defense, and score.
But there was a time when Karl Malone was just average. He was picked by the Utah Jazz in the thirteenth round of the 1985 NBA draft. Twelve other teams passed on Malone before Utah called his name, and his rookie season was lackluster. His first coach, Frank Layton, called Malone in after that first year and explained, “Karl, you have a unique combination of size and speed, but your shooting is just so-so. You will be just a journeyman, an average big man in the league unless you work on your shooting. Your shooting is your weakness.”
“I’ll go home and work on that during the off-season,” Malone told Layton. Layton had heard the same line from a thousand other players. Most never did anything about it.
But Karl Malone wasn’t most players. He recognized the truth in Layton’s words, worked his tail off during that—and every other—off-season, and became one of the best shooting forwards in NBA history. By the time he had retired, Malone had scored 36,928 points, second only to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on the all-time NBA scoring list.
The biggest difference between Karl Malone and so many other players was his willingness to work on his weakness.
Most bowhunters recognize the fact that they must practice their shooting to become more accurate in the field. They set aside the time, ready their equipment, and pound arrow after arrow into their backyard target, hoping for the best.
I’ll tell you a secret. That’s not the way to do it. The best way I’ve found to become a more accurate shooter is to work on your weaknesses.
To do that, you must first identify your weaknesses. Check your ego at the door and objectively evaluate your own shooting. I like to do that periodically in two ways.

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Try setting up a video camera and filming your shooting from all angles. A video doesn’t lie—you’ll identify your bad habits right away.

First, I’ll mentally take stock of my recent shooting performance by asking myself a series of frank questions beginning with, “How have I performed during my regular practice sessions?” The idea is to identify specific problem areas. Last summer I did that and had to admit to myself that I was missing to the right and left much more than I would like. Horizontally, most of my shots at all distances were quite good, but my weakness seemed to be stray rights and lefts. I next looked at my recent performance in the field, evaluating every shot I’d taken at big game in the last few years. I don’t mind telling you that I was a bit taken aback to note the same right-left problem.
Having identified a likely weakness in my shooting, I next set up a video camera and filmed my shooting from all angles. That’s the second step. A video doesn’t lie. It showed me exactly the shooting patterns I’d gotten into. I hadn’t taped my shooting in a long time and was amazed at how my form had changed. I was leaning back, my anchor point didn’t seem as consistent as I imagined, and my bow hand
was jumping around far too much at the shot.
The next step in serious shooting improvement, beyond identifying weaknesses, is to develop and implement a plan to work hard on those specific weaknesses.
In my case, I zeroed in on cleaning up my right and left misses. To do that, I created a four-step shooting checklist for myself. On my checklist was to stand up straighter during the shot, concentrate on a consistent anchor point, do a better job of centering my sight’s circular pin guard in my peep sight, and maintain ideal bow-hand position through the shot. That ideal position was established by consciously trying different bow-hand positions on my bow’s grip (moving my hand right and left) until I found the position in which my shooting was most consistent right and left.
I also decided to shorten the draw length of my bow slightly, as a too-long draw length often contributes to right and left misses, and to spend at least 20 minutes each practice session shooting at a target with a black, 1-inch-wide vertical line drawn down its center. The object was to hit that vertical line every time, somewhat disregarding where on the line the arrow hit.
After a month of such focused effort, my right-left problem diminished considerably.
Honest introspection may reveal different shooting weaknesses at different times. At different times, I’ve struggled with a failure to follow through properly, shooting too fast or too slow, handling the pressure of important shots, judging shot distance, shooting in dim-light situations, being able to draw my bow smoothly and easily without jerky movements, and picking a specific aiming spot on big game. Those are all common weaknesses that can be worked on and significantly improved, although each requires a different plan of action.
NBA great Karl Malone recognized his weakness and worked hard to correct it. You can do the same. Working specifically on your weaknesses is an important key to
improving your shooting.

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If you’re not satisfied with your shooting, identify and work on your weaknesses, rather than just pounding more arrows into the target.

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Published by admin on 18 Nov 2013

The New Bow Hunter By Kyle Roush

The New Bow Hunter
By Kyle Roush
AT member MN.Moose

I have been a life time hunter, born and raises around the sport of hunting in the great state of Minnesota. The passion of hunting has been passed down from generation to generation in the Roush house so it came to no surprise that I followed in these footsteps. By the age of 6 I began shooting firearms and by 8 I was going on small game hunts with my father and uncles. Then at the age of 12 I was legally allowed to enter the woods armed ready to take down a monster whitetail deer. As we all know that didn’t happen but none the less I was hooked on hunting. Just after my grandfather’s death, just after my 15th birthday, I finally put my first buck down, a simple eight pointer. I was sad that I couldn’t share the experience and the excitement with him but being in the woods I could still feel his presents.

It is funny the way life directs you and how you adjust to the opportunities that it presets, because in 2006 I ended up moving to Ohio with my new wife. From there I had to adjust from gun hunting 40 acres to 2.5 acres. Well with only 2.5 acres I didn’t have enough space from housing to continue to use the shotgun, so I was left with two choices: 1- give up hunting or 2- pick up a bow for the first time in my life at 22 years old. So that is what I did, I went out and purchased a cheap Bear bow and started to practice. Let me start by saying that hunting with a bow is way different then gun hunting. It is not so much the fact that I have to get the deer closer to me (even though that isn’t easy) as I have always taken deer within 50 yards, but the muscle control and accuracy that you have to have is amazing. It can be easy to say I hit the deer a little forward and blow through a shoulder with a shotgun but that just will not due with a bow.

Well that brings me to my first year of hunting with my bow. It was early October and after spending an afternoon at the local pumpkin patch with the family I still had 2 hours before dark so I thought I would go out and see if I can catch one walking by. By my luck I did, however like I said above you cannot expect to kill a deer unless your aim is dead on. Well the plan that I had laid out with the wind direction, projected walking path of the deer, cut shooting lanes, and sent control all paid off. The buck came in just before dark walking the edge of a corn field and walked right into my shooting lane. I waited until I could have full view of the body, picked my spot put my 20 yard pin on the deer and let loose my arrow. Unfortunately the arrow didn’t go where I wanted it to, I ended up hitting him high and to the front. He ran like the dickens, never got a single drop of blood and later that year we got sight of him again still alive. But I don’t have to tell other bow hunters that I wasn’t upset that I didn’t get the animal, I was upset that I had allowed myself to make such a bad shot. It was hard as a new bow hunter to talk myself into going back into the woods after hitting a deer and not killing it, this was my first time ever wounding but not killing and I didn’t like the way it felt. I vowed to never go back into the wood without knowing that I would make a better shot. So during the off season I shot and shot my bow over and over again, this time I feel extremely prepared. Sadly so far this year the winds and weather have not been in my favor. So far I have only had two good encounters, on a Friday that I had off from work I had 11 deer sighting with 2 being bucks. Both bucks stayed out about 90 years in the hunt for the does but wouldn’t respond. The other encounter was last Friday I used the last vacation day I had for the year and had my mind set on sitting all day. Just before daylight I had 3 does out in front of me and I thought what a good start. I was hoping that a buck would be trialing them about 30 minutes out so I could have a shot on him, and I was right the only problem he was on the other side of the field heading right to their final destination, he cut the corner and didn’t walk by. I called to him but there was no response. Then I sat ALL day and didn’t see anything. So I started to pray to my god and the deer gods just say, I have sat in this stand all day PLEASE PLEASE just let me see another deer. I don’t even care if I don’t get a shot on it I just want to see one. Then out of nowhere in front of me 30 yards I have a deer, one of those deer that sneak up on you in the wide open. I was amazed, it had worked! So I stand up, notice that it is a buck but a real young smaller buck, but when you hunt in my conditions you take what you can get. So I decide I am going to take a shot at him. He is down wind which didn’t make me feel too comfortable, so I decide the first chance I get I am going to take my shot. He is working his way close and close towards my lane and doe pee. I got him at 21 yards and as soon as he clears this last tree I will have my shot, so I draw back and he takes one more step right behind the tree and stops….. He is just standing there; I am holding and holding and holding. Now he has me worried, I am going to have to let down soon if he doesn’t take those last two steps out into the open. Then I see it, the tail wag and again the tail wags he proceeds to turn and walked away. What a hunt, lesions for any new bow hunter out there if you pray to your god and to the deer gods make sure that you don’t add that little line “I just want to see one” make sure you let them know that you want to “kill one”. Well if you need to find me I can be located here:

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Published by admin on 14 Nov 2013

The Pope & Young Club is much more than bowhuntings record keepers…

The Pope & Young Club is much more than bowhuntings record keepers…

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We are Fair Chase. Supporting the ethical pursuit of free ranging, wild game animals without unfair advantage. We are Conservation. We protect the future of bowhunting and promote the conservation of habitat and wildlife. We are Heritage. We strive to increase the awareness and appreciation of bowhuntings foundations, principles and values.We are Membership. We are a fraternity of bowhunters networked to protect the future of bowhunting. If you are an ethical, fair chase bowhunter, then YOU are the Pope & Young! Join Us Today! Dr. Saxton Pope, 1923

BASIC HISTORY

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Dr. Saxton Pope & (r) Arthur Young.

The Pope and Young Club is one of North America’s leading bowhunting and wildlife conservation organizations. Founded in 1961 as a non-profit, scientific organization whose objectives included bettering the image of bowhunting, the Club has grown to be the standard-bearer for the principles of fair chase, ethics and sportsmanship in bowhunting. Named in honor of pioneer bowhunters Dr. Saxton Pope and Arthur Young, whose exploits during the early part of the 20th Century drew national attention to this “forgotten” and challenging form of hunting, the Club encourages responsible bowhunting by promoting quality hunting, sound conservation practices, high standards of conduct and fostering dedication to the protection of bowhunting’s future.
In the early days, the Club’s objectives of proving the effectiveness of the bow and arrow and bettering the image of bowhunting proved to be keys to the acceptance of bowhunting and the establishment of bowhunting seasons around the country. Nowadays, the stalwart Pope and Young Club champions the cause of protecting our bowhunting heritage, promoting its rich values and the adherence to a strong fair chase ethic, while continuing to prove the effectiveness of conventional bowhunting equipment. For over 50 years we’ve been leading the way and setting the standard.
“In the joy of hunting is intimately woven the love of the great outdoors. The beauty of the woods, valleys, mountains, and skies feeds the soul of the sportsman where the quest of game whets only his appetite. After all, it is not the killing that brings satisfaction; it is the contest of skill and cunning. The true hunter counts his achievement in proportion to the effort involved and the fairness of the sport.”

HERITAGE

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Ishi: The last of his tribe.

In 2004, the doors to the Pope & Young Club / St. Charles Museum of Bowhunting, at the Club’s national offices in Chatfield, Minnesota, were opened, free to the public. The foundation of the museum is the largest collection of bowhunting related artifacts and memorabilia anywhere in the world. Artifacts in glassed cases, descriptive storyboards and dramatic dioramas – featuring Ishi, Dr. Saxton Pope, Arthur Young, Fred Bear and Glenn St. Charles – chart the events that shaped bowhunting’s rediscovery and evolution.
Special exhibits include, among other things, the largest and most complete publicly-displayed broadhead collection, “Journey to Africa – 1925,” the evolution of the compound bow, and representative examples of all 29 species of native North American big game animals.

CONSERVATION
Bowhunters are some of the most active and dedicated conservationists anywhere. We are committed to the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation and the scientific-based management of our natural resources – including the key role that hunters play. Our program is about leading by example. We support, with financial assistance and moral support, a wide array of projects and programs around North America in efforts to enhance and protect wildlife conservation and our bowhunting heritage. We do this by providing monetary grants annually to projects and programs in areas of wildlife research, education, pro-hunting and wildlife management. The Club is also active in a number of valuable partnership and collaborative efforts representing bowhunting and promoting bowhunting. In recent years, annual conservation budgets have exceeded $110,000 per year.

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Chief Compton

MEMBERSHIP
If you are an ethical, fair chase bowhunter, then YOU are the Pope & Young! We are men, women and youth, from all walks of life and from all corners of North America. We are well-rounded, dedicated and concerned bowhunter/conservationists who care deeply about the fair chase principles and high standards of ethics and for protecting bowhunting so that future generations can experience and appreciate all that true bowhunting has to offer. Associate Membership is open to any bowhunter who has pursued the challenge of bowhunting long enough to have taken at least one adult big game species (not necessarily a record book animal).
Membership is separate from the Records Program (i.e., entering an animal into the record book does not mean that you’re a member…each is separate). The mystique of the Pope and Young Club is often credited to our unique membership structure. The founders established a membership structure to reward longevity as both a bowhunter and as a Club supporter. Every bowhunter joins as an Associate Member. Over time, a member may advance to Regular Membership, and then on to Senior Membership, by meeting different sets of criteria, including well-rounded bowhunting experience and active involvement. Members receive quarterly news magazines, membership card, decal, Club updates and fundraising activities, access to the Members Area of the website, and more. More importantly, members gain a sense of pride belonging to a special fraternity of dedicated bowhunters, giving something back to a sport…no, a lifestyle…that means so much to them. Join Us Today! https://www.pope-young.org/secure/associate_application.asp

RECORDS
The Pope & Young Club is recognized as the official repository for records on bow-harvested North American big game. Together with the Boone & Crockett Club, we maintain the long-standing, universally-accepted scoring system and set the standards for measuring big game animals. Through the Records Program, the Club records for posterity scientific data on North American big game taken with bow and arrow. The Records Program has many purposes and objectives.

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The great Fred Bear
First and foremost, it is THE venue to honor a bow-harvested animal, throughout all time—an historical record. The Records Program is the scientific measure to compare an individual animal to others and to the ideal for that species. Each listing is a document of bowhunting history, a testament to bowhunting’s heritage and traditions. The Record Book is the principal means by which the Club can promote the ideals of fair chase and ethical standards, and protect the integrity of bowhunting.
Continuing to prove the effectiveness of conventional bowhunting equipment remains important. The Club’s ever-growing archives provide great insight into the past and present management, health and trends of North America’s wildlife populations. The Records are a testimonial to traditional wildlife management and the important role of hunting in that management.
Through the Records Program, the Club encourages quality bowhunting experiences by awakening interest in selective hunting and the outstanding examples of this continent’s big game animals. We conduct ongoing recording periods and every two years present appropriate recognition to the finest big game specimen accepted into the Records.

Join Us Today! https://www.pope-young.org

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Published by admin on 11 Nov 2013

GUIDED OR NOT – LOCAL OR ABROAD By D. I. Hay

GUIDED OR NOT – LOCAL OR ABROAD
By D. I. Hay

BlueCollar

How many times have these words passed through our minds? Usually at the end of the hunting season or after we have heard of a friend’s friend harvesting a trophy animal. First, I am an avid hunter and have been all of my adult life (now 65 years old and the knees feel like it – smile). My first introduction to a guided hunt happened many years ago and at that time I was in the same financial position that most of us find ourselves in while trying to raise a family to the best of our ability. A couple of rather disturbing realities quickly entered my mind, all detrimental to me pursuing this idea further. But, fortunate for me, I was able to deal with the most unsettling
1. The problematical one was concerning the financial obligation with regards to taking on the total cost of entering into an agreement with a potential Outfitter. What other costs were associated with a fully guided hunt?
Well, what did I know about a guided hunt, not much at the stage of my life where I was. In those days, the luxury of owning a computer and the vast amount of information readily available, was something we didn’t visualize. Not it is so much easier to gather information, as not only do we have the Internet, we have the numerous Hunting TV Shows, so many that there are complete channels devoted to the hunter and today there are many more magazines available than back then – if my memory serves me correctly we had Outdoor Life, Field & Stream and Sports Afield. I used to buy these monthly and in the back there were listed Outfitters from all over North America with the animals they offered. Today we are also provided insight into hunts from all over the world, and most are within our (the working man’s) grasp. So, here was the word which summed up my requirement to acquire the necessary funds to partake on a guided hunt – SACRIFICE. Wow, now I was getting to the “nuts & bolts” of solving my dilemma. I realized the family financial commitments could not change one penny, so all that was left was my personal spending. This could be defined as how bad did I want to go on a guided hunt and the associated costs? Well, back in the days before computers, I did a lot of letter writing and discussed, honestly, my position with each Outfitter. I used to wait and anticipate every day’s mail as I would receive another brochure\letter in response to my inquiries. Today, it is almost instantaneous over the Internet. If the questions are posed in the off-season, chances are the Outfitter will be close to his\her (yes, there are lots of female Outfitters in the world today) computer. So, a cold hard fact we are facing is “How much can we honestly save every payday?” In my case I had stopped smoking, so was able to put that money into a savings account – remember SACRIFICE. Well, I also was not drinking, but by no means am I suggesting that everyone has to give up smoking (probably a healthy decision though?) and instead of going to the corner Pub with the boys, bring a case of beer home and enjoy it in the comforts of your home (much cheaper also). So, here are a couple of ways to put some cash aside. Other areas where money can be saved would be to utilize one’s current fishing (I presume we all fish also?) tackle and hunting gear. I always agreed with the saying “The only difference between Men & Boys is the price of their Toys” So one can save a bit here. One point I would like to make abundantly clear, is that pennies add up to dollars and dollars add up to you chosen guided hunt.
The other costs associated with a hunt will be discussed in some detail in a future article – don’t worry, I am not going to leave you hanging out to dry – smile.
2. Which animal(s) are we going to hunt and where?
This question is one which cannot be addressed by anyone but the hunter themselves. We all have a love for an individual species. Mine has always been Mule Deer, as is to this day. This doesn’t mean I have not hunted other trophies over the years with an Outfitter. I have hunted most Provinces in Canada, Alaska, New Mexico, Idaho, Wyoming, Namibia & Zimbabwe. I guess we now get into the area which separates the men from the boys – we all would like to hunt elephant, lion, sheep, brown bears, etc., but to be honest, most of us just cannot afford that outlay of funds, especially if we are raising a young family. With absolutely no disrespect meant, success on archery hunts can be somewhat low and that is not implying archers are not good shots and hunters, just it is extremely difficult to get close to some of these animals so as to pull off a humane killing shot. From the outset, I have always selected at least two animals to hunt on each adventure. You may find this a bit odd, but I always wanted insurance against tagging out the first day or two of a guided hunt and then because I only selected one trophy, sat around camp waiting for my plane to arrive (I mean the big bird which would take me home). Hunting in North America can present a problem in this respect. If we only select one animal and tag out early, we are somewhat out of luck, except for Alaska where most Outfitters can sell tags. Africa is a totally different kettle of fish. If you are hunting Plains Game, you will probably provide a list of animals you would like to harvest and your PH (Professional Hunter – same as our Guide here in North America) will try to secure you shots at most of the animals on your list. Also, if he sees an exceptional specimen, he may offer you a shot at it, but only if you are interested in taking it. In my case, I started out with my favourite animal the Mule Deer and hunted it in Idaho, Wyoming, New Mexico and here in British Columbia. I did mix in an Antelope hunt in Wyoming during this time. I had always dreamed of taking an Alaskan Brown Bear, but at the start they were way out of my price range, no harm in dreaming? One day my dream came true and I was able to successfully hunt them in Alaska.
I have also taken a trophy Musk Ox in Nunavut.

Later in life I found a safari in Africa which was within my price range and literally jumped at the opportunity. The curse of hunting Africa, as most who have hunted the Dark Continent, once is never enough, so plan on returning if you ever get the chance to hunt there for a first time!!

Well, the purpose of this first article was to let you “wet your lips” and maybe even do some serious thinking about the contents so far. I am just heading out the door for a Mule Deer hunt in Alberta and will try to do some work on the next article during that time. I will guarantee I will have the next article up before Christmas. Which brings me to a very important side-note. Many hunters are dedicated to the entire hunting season, but while planning a guided hunt, you will live the whole year through the planning stages, organizing your trip and completing the hunt and culminating in the post hunt process.
See you in a month or so.
Take care and stay safe.

Yours in the Field

D. I. (Ian) Hay
Owner
Blue Collar Adventures
www.bluecollaradventures.ca
bluecollarhuntz@gmail.com

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Published by admin on 06 Nov 2013

Right stand-Right time by Ron

Right stand-Right time
By Ron aka. rjs

First of all, do you happen to know anyone that seems to connect on big deer season after season? They just seem to be in the right spot at the right time. Why do you suppose this is? It’s because they ARE in the right spot at the right time. These guys understand deer habits and how to use this knowledge to set up productive stand sites. What is the right stand at the right time you ask? I’ll explain.

I break my stand sites down into categories, early season (September), mid season (Oct. 1st-25th), rut (Oct. 25th-Nov. 25th), and my favorite, all season. Each stand has its own purpose and best time of the season to hunt it. It will also have prevailing wind direction factored in and a planned access route to get in and out. Let’s break it down even further.

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EARLY SEASON

My early season stands are typically food source stands. Crop fields, food plots and water are the most productive. I usually only hunt them in the afternoons and evenings. If I do hunt in the morning, I arrive very early to avoid bumping deer out of the fields when heading to my stand. Keep in mind that deer will migrate to different foods as the season progresses. Whitetails love soybeans, but will ignore them when they start to turn yellow and dry out. Water sources can be hit or miss. If you have a week of rain it might not make much sense to sit above your favorite pond. There will be puddles in the ditches and deer can drink without traveling very far. I won’t waste my time sitting on a yellow bean field that deer have forgotten about or overlooking a pond during a rainstorm. A productive early season stand will have a food source that is active. Again, right stand, right time. I will have a couple of stands set up over food sources. Some can be hard to hunt more than a couple of times because deer will be out in the fields and I guarantee they will bust you leaving your stand or will run into your scent trail after you leave. I will hunt these setups a couple of times then move on when the crops are harvested. I have other plans for these stands later in the season and will pull them down. Now keep in mind, if you have crops in the field that mature at different times and they become an active food source, this stand now becomes more valuable and can be used longer and becomes a mid season stand too. But, more on this later….

MID SEASON
My mid season stands will also have active agriculture food sources nearby, but also take advantage of the local acorn crop. I live in SW Wisconsin and when the acorns fall, deer sightings in the crop fields drop dramatically. A lot of people call this the dreaded “October Lull”. The deer activity seems to drop off like they left the area. Trust me, they haven’t. The deer have simply adjusted to the changing food source. I will have a stand or two that will be located off the agriculture food source and by a stand of oaks. I look for an area with an old rub line. I also look for an area that the bucks will use as a staging area this time of year. If you can find a spot that has a scrapes in it year after year, this is better yet. I wait to hunt these stands until the bucks are becoming a bit more active. Most of the local bucks will visit this spot at one time or another when the rut is just warming up. Again, right stand right time. I again only hunt these stands a couple of times. Most stands are too hard to get in and out of without being busted. The last thing you want is to alert every buck in the neighborhood that he is being hunted.

Corn, bean and Buck forage oats makes this stand productive the entire season.

THE RUT

We have now transitioned from early season to the beginning of the rut. Now for everyone’s favorite, “rut” stands. It’s no secret; the bucks go where the does are. I locate my stands just like everybody else. I look for pinch points, ditch crossings-any spot that will funnel deer to me. I set up a couple of stands between bedding areas and in travel routes that contains a rub line. I have found that there is a small window of opportunity to “mini” pattern a buck before the rut fully kicks in. Bucks are now on their feet more and will start traveling from doe group to doe group, in essence taking inventory of all the local does. More than once I have watched a buck move through a travel corridor, out of bow range, realized that I needed to adjust my stand a bit, then arrowed him later that day or a day or two later. Again, right stand right time. Another type of rut stand is for hunting “cruiser” bucks. These are the bucks that you have never seen before, have no trail camera pictures of and didn’t even know existed. I set these stands strictly off the terrain features and past buck sightings. I prefer ridge tops over valleys. I find it easier to keep the wind in my favor. I hunt this setup later in the rut, after the peak breeding is over. I might not see as many deer, hunting from this type of stand, but the ones I do are usually older age class bucks. This is the only stand that I don’t worry about overhunting and may sit these spot several days in a row. Again, right stand right time.

ALL SEASON

This brings us to my personal favorite, all season stands. Remember the early to mid season stands that have food sources that last into the late season? You can catch bucks during the rut, cruising the edges farm fields looking for does that feed in these areas. Remember the early season stand overlooking a farm pond? If November is hot and dry, this stand site might prove a winner when a rutting buck comes in for a drink. What else does a stand need to be considered all season? Well, that answer is easy, all of the above. Food, water, travel routes and bedding areas in the right locations. The best all season stands will be next to a food source with water. It will be on a travel corridor between bedding areas and have access for you to get in and out without the deer knowing it. What makes this stand special? It’s the right stand that can be hunted ANY time the wind is right. Do all properties have such spots? No, unfortunately not. You can create them with a little work, but that is a discussion for a different day. Take a look at your current stands sites, see what category they fit into and see if you are hunting the right stand at the right time.

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Published by Jeff-NC on 01 Nov 2013

Big Bucks All Locked Up – Video

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Click to see video of buck charging the hunters

I don’t know if these bowhunters are brave or really stupid

They find two big bucks locked up.  Unfortunately one buck is already dead but the hunters try to do the right thing and free the bucks.

CLICK HERE FOR THE VIDEO

Everything goes well until the hunters try to get closer for more footage…. the buck didn’t like that!

The video was captured in Oklahoma City.

 

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