BOW & ARROW HUNTING
October 1989

HOW TO Make A Custom Fit Bow Mit ~ By C.R. Learn

Say goodbye to cold bow hand with this quick easy project

OLD weather hunting can be invigorating;
it can also be damned cold. The idea of stalking deer in
snow is a good one since you really know what the game is
and you can tell how fresh tracks are. If you get a good shot in
the vitals, you have that blanket of white to aid in tracking.
Here the real problem of snow/ cold weather hunting is keeping warm.
We have sophisticated materials that are also made in camo colors so
you can keep the body shell and head warm. My problem.
one often heard from other hunters, is keeping the hands
warm. I have tried all types of gloves and the best for warmth
are wool. They also are the worst for holding onto your bow.

A glove on the bow hand is a must since that hand doesn’t
get much movement to keep up circulation. I took the bow mitt
idea seriously and scooted off to the yardage store for some
materials. I knew I wanted a nylon—type material that had
some waterproofing and some fake fur for the fuzzy warmth
factor inside. I also needed some Velcro for fastening the unit
together. A few dollars lighter in the pocket, I walked out with some
coated pack cloth — nylon used for making backpacks — and
some artificial wool shearing It looks like a sheared wool, r
but is all synthetic. A real wool hide will run you about sixty
dollars today and the synthetic costs a fraction of that.
I obtained some one-inch-wide Velcro strips for the unit
and started on my layout. l always make a pattern from paper
or, in this case, some single- sided cardboard.

The first dimension was the wrap over the bow and back to
the wrist. A few Cuts starting with an obvious oversize section and I stabilized on a piece
6% by fourteen inches. This allowed the cardboard to fully
wrap the hand on the bow and come back to the wrist, front and back.
It was wide enough to cover the hand as well as the
top and bottom of the grip area. The second part to get sized
was the wrap section that would attach to the wrist to hold the
mitt on the hand. I made it shorter and cut a section four by
twelve inches that will be attached to the longer and larger bow section.
That’s all the pattern you need and you can modify it if you have a larger riser section,
shoot open—handed or want more room.

The pack cloth was placed on the table and one section cut
for the wrap and one for the wrist. The artificial wool shearing
material was cut in the same manner, without too much fuss
for size and tight cutting procedures. The wife had what she called
batting; fluffy cotton- looking material used in blankets and padded
clothing. She I suggested it would give added warmth and she was right,
again. I laid out a section of the batting and cut two pieces as before to add to the mitt.
At this point you need a sewing machine and a few minutes
to sew it together. I always modify as I start to sew to make the project as
simple as possible. I bought an old White Rotary sewing machine years
ago to make some camo shirts. I found that many people are afraid to try something
different and the mention of cutting and sewing a shirt scared them. Since that time. I have
sewn many miles; the largest project was a ten—by—thirteen-foot wall tent.

The machine lets you make things like this mitt that you
can’t buy. If you are afraid of your macho image. you can
have the wife make this or have a tailor do it. You will be
shocked at the price a tailor or seamstress will charge for
this little item, though. Do it yourself and have the fun of making
the entire project. Start the sewing by laying the two pieces on
the machine with the outside areas facing each other. You will pull this
inside out to finish it, so you start backward. Sew three sides
and pull the unit out, forming a large pocket. Stuff the batting in this
pocket, making certain you have it even in the corners and try to
keep it as flat as you can. It does move, so you can place it
where you want it. With the wrist section, put outside faces together, make
another pocket by sewing three sides and pull it right—side out.

Stuff this with a same—size cut section of batting and you are
almost done. The next phase is to close the raw edge, the one
you stuffed from and you have a finished product with all edges
sewn closed. Sew the mitt section and the wrist section together to make
a weird looking offset that placed the wrist section an inch longer
on the left when looking from the pack cloth side. You can
place it anywhere you like. Take the Velcro fuzzy -female side — and sew one on
each end of the wrist wrap on the wooly side. I sew this all
the way around, since it can pull off if not sewn tight. This will wrap over
and mate with the hook —male.

Velcro section you will sew on the end of the mitt section. Cut an equal three-inch length
of hook material and sew it on an angle from the far end. angling toward the outside of the
mitt section. Sew this around all sides. You will also sew the
batting in place so it won’t shift when you make this Velcro
addition through all the layers. You have just completed a bow mitt that will keep your
bow hand warm while hunting. I made one last winter and took it to Arizona while javelina
hunting. The mornings were on the frosty side in January and the mitt not only kept my
bow hand warm, but had an added advantage I hadn’t anticipated. My bow hand gets
tired of gripping the bow as l tramp over hill and wash looking for pigs. All I had to do was
relax my bow hand. The bow slipped down and was held in place by the Velcro tight closed
mitt. It couldn’t fall off and l had a chance to flex and move that bow hand to reduce
tension.

This mitt was too warm for me. By the time the sun was up.
I had to take it off, because my hand was a bit too warm, l
opened up the bottom of the mitt to allow air to circulate
and it worked great that way. It is really simple to put on.

Hold the longer wrap with the wooly side up. Place the
bow you plan to carry in that section. Pull the long gip wrap
over the bow handle and fasten it to the wrist wrap using the
upper tab. The mitt is attached to the bow at the upper grip
area. Place your hand on the riser and grip the bow as you will
carry or shoot it. Pull the other loose tab over the bottom of
the wrist and up to the mitt section using the angled section of
Velcro hook to close that section. The mitt is now closed
over your hand and grip area. You can make it tighter or looser
by adjusting the Velcro tabs. You should be careful of the
upper mitt section and be certain it doesn’t cover your arrow
rest. The front of the mitt should be below the shooting area
where the arrow will move across during draw and release.

This is easy to adjust and after a few shots you will ignore the
mitt and just use the bow normally. When not using the mitt, you
can wad it up and stuff it in your pocket or your day pack. When I
was finished using it in the morning. l opened it up flat and placed it
inside my shirt next to my back as a kidney warmer.

lf money is no object, you could purchase a shearling hide
and make the mitt from real wool. I’d really prefer that myself. but for the price l’ll use the
synthetics. <—<<

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