Do-It-Yourself Arrow Storage Box – by Glenn Helgeland
Archery World July 1982

ARHERY WORLD JULY 1982

Storing arrows can be a pain, but here’s an efficient, neat way to store
a bunch of them attractively and safely.

All it involves is a wooden box with the key to the unit being one or two pieces of eggcrate-style covering units intended for recessed lighting. Most any lumberyard should have everything you need.

The photos with this story show the construction and finished product.

Don’t be put off by the size of the arrow box shown. I need one that size because I use a lot of different types of arrows for photographic purposes, and over the years. I’ve accumulated a lot of different types.

Now that my kids are starting to shoot, we need arrow storage for me, my wife and the kids. You want to know how fast a few kids can go through a supply of arrows? Fast enough that I make certain they’re going to shoot only wooden ones for a while; I can’t afford anything else for them.

Materials include ll4″ and/or 3/8″ plywood, 1″ x 1/2″ furring strips, wood glue, piano hinge, a handful of 4- or 6-penny box nails, about three feet of nylon webbing, two locking hooks with eyes, four stove bolts with appropriate nuts and washers, and the eggcrate units.

The best thing about this box is that the only blueprints you’ll need are in your head, and it doesn’t cost much to produce. Just figure out how many arrows you need to store and plan accordingly. One tip: Arrows can be stored in every square of the eggcrate, but you’ll do less ruflling of fletching if you store them in alternating squares. The amount of storage space you have available will help you make that decision.

Once you determine the outside dimensions of the box, cut the plywood to fit, cut four furring strip pieces to fit the full width and cut four small blocks from the furring strips to glue in place as support midway underneath the length of the upper and lower eggcrate units.

Furring strips and blocks to support the lower eggcrate unit are glued on the floor piece and to the end pieces, then nailed.  This gives good strength. Furring strips and blocks to support the upper unit are glued far enough down from the top to at least allow the eggcrate to be positioned flush with the top of the plywood.

You can recess it in as far as you like. I left a 2-l /2 inch slot on the front of the box to lighten it a bit and to make it easy to check the arrow tips to see if they were dropping in position. Trying to peer down through one eggcrate unit at another eggcrate unit and line up arrows at the same time will make you crosseyed in a hurry.

The upper front panel could be much narrower. All you really need is a strip wide enough to serve as a stiffener and to keep the eggcrate unit from sliding out. (The two eggcrate units are simply dropped in position on the furring strips. There’s no need to fasten them in.)

I used a piano hinge to fasten the box hinge on the wall. This keeps it out of my kids’ reach, yet I can drop the unit forward to make it easier for arrow placement. The webbing is simply bolted to the box with stove bolts, washers and nuts.I ran the bolts through the furring strips to gain
maximum support. The straps are fastened to my garage wall with through-the-wall collapsible nuts on stove bolts fitted with large washers.

I used locking hooks with the eyes so my kids wouldn’t accidentally knock the hooks loose and have the box crash down on their heads.

What do I do with arrows which have a fixed broadhead? I remove the insert and replace it with a screw-in insert. I have a box of field points on a nearby shelf and the broadheads are stored where my kids can’t get into them.

Cost? Depends upon the size arrow box you build. Should be less than $25, even if
you need  to buy plywood. the eggcrate units I bought cost $6.50 each.

Someday I may even get around to staining or painting the plywood. That probably
will be the same day I clean out my garage. I will have aged by then.

Just how many arrows will this huge box store? Subtracting the squares under the furring strip blocks and end pieces. I came up with 1,914 Storing them every other square means 957 arrows.

I don’t believe I’ll ever need to build a second one. I can store a pile of arrows in a small space with these eggcrate units, keeping them safe from damage. <–<<

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