ARE YOU READY TO ROCK?                                                                                                by Ted Nugent

When I ask myself if I’m ready, I mean am I really ready for anything and everything, all the time. Way before I think about preparing for the upcoming hunting season, I discipline myself to be ready for the day, each and every day when I rise to carpe’ diem! And boy do I ever carpe’ that Diem with a full throttled vengeance. Why mess around. Plan B is for clowns who think Hee Haw was a documentary.

I of course take the absolute best care possible of my mind, body, spirit and soul. I don’t eat junk, remain clean and sober at all costs, and fast food at the Nugent household is represented by teal in the freezer. We know our body is a sacred temple, and sacred temples don’t have toxins or blubber, San Antonio.

By the time I was nine, my wonderful over-disciplinarian dad drilled into our heads that the Boy Scout motto was not only for Boy Scouts, and that not only is being prepared the right and only mindset to have, but being unprepared is downright irresponsible and dangerous. Does anybody other than the Nugent boys still live this way? I hope so.

I lift myself out of bed, go through all the prepatory personal hygiene and fortification procedures, and make sure my pants pockets have all the bare essentials; pocket knife, folding knife, large handkerchief, truck and house keys, chapstick, lighter, folding reading glasses, small flashlight, spare 3V battery, a wad of guitar picks, wallet with ID, credit cards, cash, insurance card, a few business cards, family photos, a couple of bandaids, and a flat, lighted magnifying glass. No bulk, perfectly streamlined.

Then I go to my belt, on which I secure my handgun(s), spare mags, and belt tool.

In my double pocketed shirt I find my ever present small pad, pen, marker and cell phone, my law enforcement credentials and shield.

Okay, I’m ready for anything.

My truck is a whole different story, loaded with the basic survival, emergency gear obvious to those who live the rugged individualism that makes America and Texas great. Registration and proof of insurance, heavy duty work gloves, phone charger, flashlight, basic tools, air compressor, tire gauge, 1st aid kit, chainsaw,  flares, HD jack, jumper cables, rifle with lots of spare ammo, rain slicker, towel, snake bite kit, fire starter, a few MREs, some water and spare sun glasses to just name some of my gear.

You notice my phone, keys, handgun and other basics are on my person, not in my truck. A knife in the truck does not quality as a “pocket knife”. That would be a “truck knife” and will not be handy when away from the truck.

Critically, the same goes for your handgun. Everybody at Luby’s that fateful day had their guns in the truck, and only a fool would dare fail to learn from that lesson of life and death. I personally choose life.

Also in my truck is a full tank of fuel. I have taught my family that when the fuel gauge gets to the half way mark, fill er back up. With the lessons learned over so many years, a full tank of gas or diesel can make all the difference in the world when things go bad. And for those not paying attention, things do indeed go bad, and for the truly tuned in, things are more likely today to go real bad now more than ever. There’s a fuel gauge on your dash for a reason. Take a look at it often.

I hang out with some mighty rough and tumble hombres, hard-working ranching, outdoors types that fancy themselves plenty ready to rock. Unfortunately, many Texans are not really prepared adequately, more often than not, leaving everything “in the truck”.

Cellphones are small so as to be convenient to keep on our persons, on hand for when family and friends may really need to get ahold of us. And of course, they should be charged up each night while we sleep.

Same goes for that lovely little belt tool. I use mine dozens of times each and every day.

And handkerchiefs? I cannot believe how few men carry a clean handkerchief with them at all times. I consider it an essential.

As you read this little ditty here in our favorite outdoor publication, we are gearing up for spring turkey season, but I got my turkey hunting gear all reviewed and ready way back in January. In the springtime, I am actually getting ready for the fall hunting season, reviewing all my archery gear and making certain all my hunting gear is in perfect order way in advance so I don’t lose a precious minute when the season is upon us.

I will be rocking my royal keeshker off all summer long, but still shooting my bow and arrows every day to stay on my A game. Like a fighter jet pilot who must be ready at a moment’s notice, I like to manage my life to always be ready so I never have to scramble wildly at the last minute. Being prepared is good. Not being prepared, lame. Be prepared.