I made this string stop for my 2007 Bowtech Patriot II last summer and my buddy still makes comments on my bow’s quietness nearly each time we shoot together.  I spent under $10.00 and think that it turned out pretty well. My only initial worry was how much extra weight this would add versus a carbon based rod but I couldn’t even tell the weight difference once I first added this to my bow. I’m doing this from memory.  So, bear with me.

From the hardware store you’ll need:
– 5/16 inch fine-threaded rod (Fits nearly all bows that I know of)
– One 5/16 inch fine-threaded nut
– Two rubber stoppers of the same size (3/4″ to 1″ in diameter at the large end)
– Black Heat shrink wrap slightly bigger than the threaded rod (My local hardware store had white and red too)
– Black O-rings and Washers that fit snuggly over the threaded rod (For extra vibration deadening and appeal)

Step By Step:
1. Thread the rod as far as it will go into your bow’s rear threaded hole beside your string. Be careful not to let the threading rub against your strings. Make a sharpe mark on the rod about 1/4″ (or exactly half the length of your rubber stoppers) away from your string towards your bow’s riser. Use bolt cutters or have the hardware store use their chain cutters to cut ONLY the mark near your string for you. Be sure to take the rod out of your bow first!
2. Drill a hole slightly smaller than the rod about halfway into one of the rubber stoppers and all the way through the other stopper. And then take the stopper with the hole all the way through it and drill a hole slightly larger than your 5/16 nut halfway through it, starting on the larger end of the stopper.
3. Put some fletching glue of your choice (I’m a Goat Tuff guy) in the stopper with the hole halfway through it and glue it onto the self-cut end of the rod, not the factory cut that was threaded into your bow. Be sure to try and glue it as squarely as possible so that the flat surface of the stopper and the rod make a perfect 90 degree angle.
4. While that’s drying, apply serving to your bow string where the stopper is going to make contact with it.
5. Once the stopper dries, insert it into your bow’s threaded hole and screw it all the way in. Now back it out to the point to where it’s just about to completely touch your string serving but you can still see the slightest amount of daylight between the two. Make a sharpe mark about 1/2″ away from your bow’s threaded hole.
6. Now cut a peice of shrinkwrap, or two peices in my case, that will cover from your new sharpee mark all the way up to your newly glued on rubber stopper. Follow your shrink wraps directions.  I just used a lighter. Be sure to remove the rod from your bow before you start putting a flame to it!
7. Apply the rubber washers and o-rings of your choice to your threaded rod – I did this to add vibration absorption and to cover up the joint between my two peices of shrink wrap. Then slide the other rubber stopper as far as you can onto the rubber rod, small end towards the string end. And last, screw the nut onto the rod as far as it will go.
8. Now insert the rod all the way back into your bow’s threaded hole. Back it out to the desired point and countersink the nut against your bow’s insert with a wrench (Countersinking is like trying to unscrew the nut from the rod and purposefully letting the bow get in the way). Set the nut pretty tightly because it will get a lot of vibration and abuse but be careful not to mess up your bow’s threaded insert.
9. Slip the unglued rubber stopper over the remaining bare rod and nut and adjust your o-rings and rubber washers so that they don’t make contact with your cables or other equipment.
10. Get ready to receive lots of comments on your bow’s quietness and get ready to laugh at your friends who dropped $40 or more on an STS!

Don’t forget to wax the stopper and your string serving regularly!