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Published by j_miller on 02 Aug 2012

Starting My Hunting Career

I sat in the cold, dark room. They were playing a hunting safety video. I had just begun my life as a hunter, this was the first step. 3 days had gone by and I waited, anxious to take the test of what I had learned in the past 3 days. The test was handed to me and I ZIPPED by! I went through the test so fast that I skipped  an entire 2 pages. But of course I finished it.

Anyways, my dad had said, “Let’s see who got the highest test score.”

We both got a 100% so that was pointless. Moving on, we moved along in our Lexus excited and relieved to start our careers as hunters (and yes a Lexus). Now, the real story begins with our first hunt, doves. And just so we’re clear my dad bought me a Remington 870 pump action 20 gauge. So we were both set with our shotguns and traveled 2 hours to the sunflower fields.

On September 15, 2012 a long day had passed and I settled with one dove. We didn’t have much luck that day, but it was loads of fun.

* * * * *

After about a month, I started my first deer hunt on the same property as the dove. It was the youth hunt and I was lucky to be selected to get a tag. I was using my Remington 870 pump action with slug barrel, Remington Optics Scope, and 2 3/4 in. slugs. The first two days we were set up in a blind and there was no activity. So the last day of the youth hunt we decided to go to a different property. We quickly set up and got into the blind with no activity so far. I started to lose hope, but with 30 minutes ’til sundown I looked up and out to field and saw a doe then more and more came. Unfortunately, none came into range so I left shorthanded and with a leftover tag.

I decided to start my bowhunting career by slowly working my way up to the legal draw limit for whitetail. I was shooting and still are shooting a Youth Mathew’s Mission Menace. By the time I reached my goal it was late October. The night before my first bow hunt I sighted in my bow well at 20 yards , and would set off in the morning. Little did I know what lied ahead that morning, I sat patiently but anxiously during the 30 minute car ride. As we pulled in I got my gear ready to go. I said goodbye to my dad and started treking down the hill with my fellow hunting partner. It took me a bit, but I got situated into my treestand. I have a youtube account so I decided to do a First Person Shooter (FPS) video with my iKAM extreme. The man in the other stand had a doe walk by his stand and took a shot. He was high so he hit the spine. This was my first deer hunt where some action came into hand so I was sitting there wondering what was going on. Turns out I did get some of it on video, but it took him a while to get another good shot, but eventually I looked over and there was a doe lying on the ground. This was the first deer hunt with a kill in it, so I was a satisfied camper even if it wasn’t my harvest.

That same night I was invited to go over to a neighbor of the man I hunted with in the morning. Little did I know that that evening would start a great relationship. At around 2:30 in the afternoon we arrived at the neighbor’s house. We gathered our things together, and headed out for the woods. By the time I was at my treestand and all set up the sun started going down slowly but surely. No activity that night for me atleast. Now I could tell you about all my hunts, but I’m not going to bore you to death. Most of them were the same anyways maybe one or two deer. So with that said let’s move on.

It was the second to last day of bowhunting season, mildly cold temperatures, bits of snow on the ground, it seemed like a good night. I was totally right in the last sentence because it was the best night yet. We treked down to the elevated blind located just outside the perimeter of the major food plot. With an hour and a half left of time, we’d seen some does chased by bucks. They obviously scrammed off, but to our surprised were just drinking in the creek only about 30 yards away. Eventually, they started their way back, but they were not alone. More and more came by the numbers! I looked outside the camoflagued covered window, and I didn’t even get a chance to count to 5 seconds before the next deer came. We counted about 24-26 deer all at the same place at once. It was such a rare sighting that even the man I was hunting with was shocked! He’d been hunting that property for who knows how many years, and rarely has he EVER seen that. Back to the story, there were some nice 8-10 pointers. Old fellas too, they had nice browtines, and even had a droptine or two. So he had taken a shot at one (but rarely would do such a thing because of the lack of bucks on his property, but they were old so that’s why). It was about a 30-35 yard shot so it was a tough one. He obviously missed because rarely do you get a deer from 30-35 yards away,and the deer scrammed so I thought that this season was over and I wouldn’t fill my tag. Anyways, we were joking about how I’d bumped him when he took his shot. During the joking I asked if we could switch seats because I didn’t have much of a clear shot on–well nothing.

With about 45 minutes left a small fork buck came trotting in behind it, a doe. Now the doe was a little skeptical unlike the buck, but the doe was right to be that way. When the little buck closed in at about 17 yards I took a shot but was about an inch high (I know I said he doesn’t like dead bucks, but I think he really wanted me to get a deer). Luckily, I didn’t hit the spine, but unfortunately I didn’t hit the vitals. My excuse was that the kisser on my bow wasn’t lined up against the side of my lips right. But I was still a happy guy for now. Overall, I had met lots of great people. And I am excited to start a new season. Hopefully I’ll do better this year.

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Published by striper on 30 Jul 2012

VICTORY VAP ARROWS/OUTSERTS

CURIOUS ON THESE ARROWS AND IF THERE WORTH THE MONEY.HEARD THE OUTSERTS BEND.ANYONE HAVE ANY ADVICE ON THESE THANKS FOR YOUR ADVICE

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Published by archerchick on 25 Jul 2012

Watching The Woods Change -By Randall Schwalbach

Archery World – October 1987
Watching The Woods Change
By Randall Schwalbach
The freedom of exploring wild places is one of the joys of hunting. There’s nothing like the anticipation of going out of state on the big hunt. New country, new faces, new challenges — that’s what turns on bowhunters like you and me. At the same time, however, many of us enjoy returning to a favorite hunting spot year after year. I enjoy roaming a woodlot in central Wisconsin where I started bowhunting whitetail deer 15 years ago. It has become sort of an annual pilgrimage, and come mid-September my thoughts converge on this chunk of heaven I call the Big Hoods.
The Big Woods
What I find most amazing about the Big Woods is that it is in a state of constant change. Not only does habitat evolution/ alteration affect deer movement on a year to year basis, but also new generations of deer acquire new patterns and survival techniques. In order for you to enjoy continuous success at your own “old faithful ,” I’m going to share some of my experiences with this evolution at my own tried and true Big Woods. Did you ever marvel at how fast a tree grows? Just look out your window at that maple you planted in the backyard when your irst son or daughter was born. Amazing, isn’t it! Now, consider that a tree is useful to deer for different reasons during the course of its life, and you’ll see why no woods can ever stay the same. When it is small, a tree is likely to be either (1) eaten or (2) used as cover – or quite possibly both. Toward the end of its sapling status, it serves as a good place to polish antlers and test brute strength. Between this and the fruit bearing stage, say, if it is an oak, the tree as an individual is not highly useful. The point is, the woods are a collection of many trees, either in a process of growth or death, and as a unit the woods are indeed constantly changing – right before your eyes.
When I first started hunting the Big Woods, the northern edge was well defined. It butted up against a 20 acre farm field that lay fallow and consisted of thick canary grass and tall goldenrod, with a few small aspen and birch scattered through. In the past 15 years, however, the oaks and maples of the Big Woods have grown out into the field, producing a “zone” rather than a strict delineation or “edge.” The deer used to cross the 20 acre field rather quickly to go between cornfields and the woods. They entered the woods at the corners and at a few select points along the edge. The sign they left was concentrated at these entrances. Now the deer actually “live” in the field and in the “zone” created by the advance of the Big Woods. The cover is much thicker and there are many more lanes of safe travel for deer. Individual trails, however, are not as prominent, and the sign is less concentrated. I think there are more deer now, but they make less impact.
How has my hunting strategy changed? For starters, I alarm too many deer if I walk
 through the zone between woods and field, which is where my old walking trail is. I now enter the woods from a different side. Because the deer come into the woods from any point along the north boundary, I now have better luck hunting farther into the woods itself, where main trails are still in use and sign is concentrated. For nostalgic reasons, I sometimes sit in my old stands along the “edge,” but my luck there is seldom good. It is important to understand that the Big Woods itself is used primarily for three things: (1) acorns, (2) a rutting area and (3) a lane for quick travel to a major swamp/bedding ground to the south. As the only major highland in the area, the Big Woods is strategic for the hunter with a discerning eye.
There is an annual adjustment in deer movement directly related to farm crop rotation. Although my woods are not bordered by any tilled land, there are fields in three different directions. The field to the west is 100 yards distant and is always planted in corn. Encompassing a half section of land, the corn planted there often becomes primary escape cover as well as a food lot. In alternate years, roughly, there is corn to the north and to the east, within a quarter to half mile of my woods. Because deer seem to enjoy variety just as much as we like to try out different restaurants, they will travel the extra distance between these fields and my woods. This is in favor of the deer, from a biologist’s point of view, for it decreases social pressure and interaction. From a hunter’s standpoint, deer sign spreads out and hot-spots become less of a factor. The deer are everywhere, and they approach the woods from all sides, complicating the matter of placing a stand, particularly in relation to wind direction.
The availability of natural food supplies also changes from year to year. During the fall, one of the most important deer foods to look for is the acorn, fruit of the oak tree Since one species of oak may produce more acorns than another in a given year, pay attention to the different groves of oak in any one woods. Furthermore, mast producing capabilities of individual trees within a species also vary. (See my article, “Acorn Time ’s the Time” in Archery World August, 1986, for the complete lowdown on oaks and acorns. Differences in food supply, remember, affect not only where the deer eat, but also where they bed and from which direction they approach the woods.
Natural events such as a violent windstorm can change deer patterns dramatically. Several summers ago one storm took more than 100 of our big oaks. The deer had formerly been accustomed to a clear view in the mature timber, which they traveled through at a quick walk. When the trees came down, it gave predators (like me) good places to hide. so the deer had to slow down and move through the area with greater caution. ln effect, this gave them more time to detect my presence.
In many instances, downed trees also obscured my vision, making it harder for me to spot deer approaching favorite stands. My father and I used to love one open glade in the late afternoon as the deer approached through the slanting rays of sunshine. This perennial stand suddenly became a poor hunting locale. It remained that way until we got in there with a chain saw and restored some order to the area. Shortly the deer returned to using their old trails with confidence. A further outcome of the windstorm was the creation of a new hunting strategy for me – the pit blind. In a nutshells, the upturned root end of a windblown oak created a natural hole for a hunter to crawl into. A little improvement with a spade, and I had a first-class blind that put me as close as I’ve ever been to wild deer. For example, six inches between my face and the antlered end of one whitetail buck was CLOSE!
Another kind of evolution that can force a hunter to revise his strategy is a change of land ownership. When my father first purchased the Big Woods in the early 60’s, all the adjacent lands were owned by farmers. As they subsequently sold off of small parcels (split off the big farms) to non-farmers, the result was a loss of hunting grounds for us and a decline in the hunting potential on our own land. One person put an old mobile home smack dab on the edge of our property, ruining one area totally. Another routinely invites more people to hunt his land than he actually has room for, producing the added headache of a trespass problem for us. We have made the necessary adjustments for these changes, however, and fortunately we still have excellent hunting at the Big Woods.
Possibly you are contemplating buying your own land for hunting. The best advice I
have for you is to locate an available parcel adjacent to a large tract of land that is least likely to be split up and sold off in small parcels. By the same token, don’t purchase hunting land with the idea that it will provide instant and easy access to other peoples’ lands. Neighbors may be willing to grant you hunting rights on their land, but don’t assume this. Acquire enough land of your own to provide for your sporting needs.
In addition to habitat evolution, food availability and change of land ownership, there is the possibility of new generations of deer acquiring new habits – that is, adapting new ways to avoid you. I believe that due to wide-spread use, the overall effectiveness of the tree stand has diminished significantly over the past 10 years. When I first started hunting out of trees for deer, the results were fabulous. Most of the stands I used were no more than 10 feet off the ground, and deer were always walking right underneath me. Rare indeed were the occasions the deer looked up out of natural curiosity, even after detecting a strange odor or hearing a sound that was out of place. I used one tree in particular over and over, year after year, with excellent success. Gradually, however, the deer became wise to my strategy, forcing me to become more of a specialist at the arboreal ambush. Indeed, trees were still good places to hide, but the deer were starting to check out the various trees as they went about their business. I learned to pay more attention to camouflaging myself with natural materials and shadows, whereas before I had relied upon sheer elevation.
Also, once the deer spotted me in a tree stand, it seemed to make a larger impact on their memory, and the effectiveness of any given tree stand diminished through usage. Today, I still use tree stands, but I change their locations more frequently, and I generally go much higher – 22 feet is about average. For all purposes, I have abandoned the permanent, wooden platform made of 2×4 lumber in favor of the portable, aluminum stand which I can backpack in and out of the woods. The latter are more effective as they can be put in almost any tree. They also create less of an eyesore when I leave, for I take them with me.
In addition to tree stands, I spend more time these days still-hunting and waiting in ground blinds. The end result of all this is a continuous, intensive scouting program to keep abreast of the natural changes in the woods as well as man-made-alterations. We always think to ourselves, “Wouldn’t it be nice if some things would just stay the same forever?” But the truth is, that old hunting spot of yours is bound to change; it changes a little bit every day. Spend some time revising your bowhunting strategies to suit the new conditions and it will pay you off with the one thing that doesn’t change – the satisfaction of making a kill with the bow and arrow.
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Published by archerchick on 25 Jul 2012

My “Dream” Buck by Michael Henson

Archery World – October 1987

My “Dream” Buck by – Michael Henson

 

Well concealed and silent, the westerner stalked his trophy steadily for more than three hours; like a magnet, it attracted more and more deer. Suddenly, his bowhunting partner appeared and spotted the deer, pulled his bow out of the truck and loosed the perfect arrow.

 

I refocused my rangefinder and looked at  the yardage indicator once again.   “Sixty-two yards. I don’t dare move any closer,” I said to myself. Glancing at my watch, I realized that three hours had gone by since I first spotted this record book mulie. My thoughts quickly faded though as my eyes again were drawn to the bedded-buck’s wide 5×5 rack, still in velvet. It moved periodically as he nibbled at the grass around him and methodically chewed his cud.

“He’s gotta be Pope and Young material ,” I thought. Feeding below this buck was a respectable 4×4, approximately 40 to 50 yards away. He was nice, but definitely not the quality of the bedded, larger one. Occasionally, I would also catch glimpses of a 3×3 and a doe who were also browsing a little further downhill. No matter what else was going on, my attention went quickly back to the big 5×5. What a nice animal! In 20 years of hunting deer, with both rifle and bow, I had never been this close to such a fine buck. This truly was a deer hunter’s “dream come true.” But could it come true for me?

 

 

Fallen Log?

 

This whole dream began in the fall of 1985 after I had moved to Aztec, New Mexico, which is located in the northwestern corner of the state. I relocated there on a job transfer from Minnesota, knowing full well I was leaving excellent whitetail country. However, I knew that I was headed for superb mule deer and elk hunting just north of Aztec, in the San Juan National Forest of southern Colorado. After moving there, it didn’t take long for me to meet the person responsible for my being on this particular mountain — his name — Peter Akins. It seems like the good Lord planned our introduction, so when Peter and I met we found out we talked the same language: archery hunting, specifically, the deer and elk dialect.

 

 

Peter himself, has never shot a big-game animal with a rifle. I don’t think he even owns one. However, with bow and arrow it’s a different story. He rarely fails to fill his elk and deer tags. I think he felt sorry for this Minnesota boy, subsequently inviting me to join him and his brothers, Russell and Mark, for the 1986 hunting season in Colorado. I was able to squeeze in my brother Jim, from back in Silver Bay, Minnesota, who ultimately plays a major role in this story. So now here I am, a little over 30 yards from a bedded-down, big 5×5 mulie.

 

Every time he moves a muscle or turns his head, my pulse quickens. Who would ever think a deer chewing it’s cud could get you so excited! I thought to myself, “Couldn’t I sneak my arrow by those broken trees, partially obscuring his body? This might be my best chance. The wind might change, or simply quit due to an approaching thunderstorm.” But a wee small voice said, “Patience. Just wait — let’s don’t blow it .” So I again relaxed, resting my 65 pound Golden Eagle compound in a small loop on my camouflaged pant leg.

 

Blow it?

I almost had already. Earlier, around 11:00 a.m. I was still hunting back toward camp, where I was to meet Jim for lunch at noon. It was a perfect day. A slight breeze in my face from below, and the aspen leaves overhead making a slight rustling noise in the background. During the preceding night a much needed rain shower made the walking almost noiseless. I had just moved out of some dense, dark spruce and pine trees into an area of open, mature aspen. I was slowly working my way down to a gravel road, where I would quickly walk back to camp. So far, this morning had been unproductive. I had seen neither elk nor deer, so when I looked downhill and saw a horizontal form approximately 100 yards away, I didn’t think too much about it. My first impression was that it was just another fallen log, but was it? There he was. Moving ever so slightly as he browsed on the lush green foliage. What a magnificent rack! My first thought was, “How in the world am I gonna get close enough in this open aspen for a decent shot?”

My problem compounded immediately when I noticed a 4×4 mulie bedded down a short distance away from this big one. He was a little closer and it was much more open for a possible shot. Then the 5×5 decided he wanted to lay down. “Great,” I thought, “two sets of eyes, open cover and considerable distance to make up. Tough odds.” Somehow though, step by step, using my small 8×35 binoculars, watching closely and keeping as many trees between us as possible, I closed to within about 60 yards. That was as close as I could go, and the only shot possible was at the 4×4. Instead of being patient, I attempted a shot, my arrow hitting a tree on the way. WHAM! I just new I had blown it. The deer jumped up, and trotted away. Then they stopped, looked around for what seemed forever and started feeding again. “I can’t believe it! Just be cool, Mike” , I told myself. Both bucks moved slowly away and got almost out of eye contact. Moving slowly in their direction about 40 yards, I realized there were now four deer. Here’s where they apparently picked up the 3×3 and the doe. Now four sets of eyes.
Moving ever so quietly, one step at a time, I was able once more close to about 60 yards. Then it happened again. First the big 5×5, then the 4x4 – they both lay down. By this time I had lost sight of the 3×3 and doe. Apparently, they both moved downhill toward the gravel road about 100 yards below me. After about 10 to 15 minutes, the 4×4 got up and began feeding away from me with the 5×5 still bedded down. This turned out to be the best thing that could have happened. With the 5×5 looking downhill at the other deer’s activity, I was able to move behind the big boy. I continuously checked the distance with my rangefinder just in case I needed a quick shot.
 Two broken trees, bent over almost touching each other, made it difficult to try a shot. I told myself, “Patience, Mike – just wait.” By now a little over three hours had elapsed. Jim, I knew, would be wondering where I was since I hadn’t made it to camp for lunch. What a surprise and shock when the sound of a diesel engine coming, turned out to be Jim driving my truck on the road below. “He must be looking for me,” I thought. “Now what’s he doing?” I couldn’t believe it, but my truck stopped. “There’s no way he can see me up here, and for all he knows, I could be six miles away.”
 I didn’t find out until later but here’s what took place…Driving around the corner, Jim saw the 3×3 buck standing about 10 yards off the mountain road about 75 yards away. Jim stopped the truck, slid over to the passenger side, got out and walked to the back of the truck, opened the topper and got out his Golden Eagle compound. Peeking around the corner of the truck, he couldn’t believe what he saw! The buck was still there trying to figure out what was going on. Guessing the distance at around 75 yards, and knowing he couldn’t get any closer without spooking him, Jim drew back. Releasing his 2117, XX75 arrow, the 140-grain, 4-blade Rocky Mountain broadhead flew perfectly, hitting behind the 3×3 buck’s front shoulder.
He ran 50 yards and then piled up. Now remember, I had no idea what was going on. I couldn’t hear or see anything except my truck way down there. The only thought in my mind was about my deer getting spooked – for both buck’s ears were up, as they looked downhill. Then it happened! Apparently when Jim’s deer took off after being solidly hit, the big 5×5 stood up. Still not knowing what just took place down below, I reacted instinctively and came to full draw. The 5×5 and 4×4 were now standing together, butl still didn’t have a shot because of four aspen. “Come on, make a move. I can’t hold it much longer,” I thought. Then, just as I was about to relax, the 5×5 moved just enough to give me a shot. Shaking as I released my arrow, it went just underneath him! But he didn’t move, and he was still looking downhill. I couldn’t believe it! In one motion I nocked another arrow; came to full draw, and sent my Rocky Mountain broadhead on its way. This time it was perfect.
The arrow hit him solidly behind the front leg, he barely moved. He managed to walk slowly though about 20 yards; then stopped; wobbled and fell; rolling over twice. I couldn’t believe it! But there he was – a trophy of a lifetime. Saying a quick prayer of thanks, I hurried down the mountain to see what Jim was up to. Was he surprised to see me coming! Each of us had quite a story. No way could either of us easily comprehend what had just happened. I didn’t know what he was doing, and he didn’t know what I was doing, nor even where I was. Unbelievable as it was, we both filled our deer tags within about 60 seconds of each other. Somehow, we each helped the other without even realizing it.
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Published by archerchick on 25 Jul 2012

Cornfield Deer – By Richard Martin

Archery World – October 1987

Cornfield Deer

By Richard Martin

Dick, you doing anything right now?”
“Nothing special, why?” “I’d like you to
come out here. Want to show you something? The
man who called was a farmer in north central
Ohio, a longtime friend who lives just a few miles
from my home. And when my pickup lifted the dust in
his driveway he was sitting in his cornpicker waiting
patiently.

“I’m harvesting about a 40 acre patch of corn here,
and it’s just full of deer, just full of them. They did

pretty good around here on the opening day of gun season, then the
deer just disappeared. Well, I know where they disappeared
to.”
I was interested in getting some good closeup
photos of deer, so I readied my camera and climbed up
to the cab, planning to hang on outside and shoot as I
could. Whitetails are notoriously indifferent to tractors, cultivators,
and harvesting equipment, and I expected to get close, but I
wasn’t planning on point blank range!

On the first pass through the com an eight
point buck and two does meandered out,
watched us pass, and faded back into the corn.
On the next a fat six pointer and three more
does walked out and back into still standing
stalks. Finally, I got off the picker and started
hiking in cleared stretches alongside. I could
still get within 20-25 yards of at least a dozen
deer on each pass. They knew that corn was
safe and they just wouldn’t leave until the en-
tire field had been reduced to a few isolated
rows. It was enough to start me thinking.

The Tassel Hassle
Archers don’t seem to give a hoot about
standing corn one way or the other, but gun
hunters hate the stuff. Here in Ohio and
doubtless in other mid westem states when
timber and crops mingle, they like to drive
during the gun season. And once deer have
experienced a drive or two, they head for the
center of big cornfields and stay there.
Most farmers won’t allow hunters to drive
corn for obvious reasons, and those who will
or hunt their own comfields rarely come up
‘with much. The animals ghost from row to
row, circle back around again and again, and
simply refuse to leave unless hard pressed and
hassled to distraction. Corn has kept many a
deer alive for another year.
Once again, archers don’t seem to worry
about standing corn, but they definitely

should because in many places this richly nu-
tritious food supply is an easy way to till the
freezer with venison that’s close to prime
beef. None of your stringy little mountain
deer here, just big comfed bucks that routinely
dress out 150-200 pounds plus. But before
you charge the nearest field of standing
fodder and attempt to fill your tag on a monstrous
buck, there are a few basic points to
keep in mind.

First of all, cornfields are no help at all in
country where everything is com. In areas
where fields of standing stalks stretch on for
miles the deer simply have too much choice.
They can loaf in this 80 acre patch or walk
across a fencerow to visit that 200 acre section,
or hike a few more yards and cavon in
640 acres of good cover. You get the point.

They’ll be in standing com routinely, but you
aren’t going to find them, except by great
good luck.

The situation you’re looking for, and it occurs
often in the midwest, is a good sized
cornfield nestled in among timber, brushy areas,
rolling hills and valleys, in short, mixed
terrain and limited corn. They’re not hard to
find if you’ll do a little looking and I’ve man-
aged to pinpoint quite a few areas where
farmers plant corn at least every other year
and plant it in territory in the middle of prime
deer country. It makes my day when I drive by
and see those young corn shoots coming up in
early spring.

One of these is definitely classic and the
first time I saw it, my mouth simply watered.
The field was about 40 acres of already chest
high corn, and on one side stood a brushy area
that was darn near impenetrable! I walked it
through, left a little blood here and there in
thickets of multiflora rose and blackberry bri-
ers and marveled, while I muttered bad things
under my breath, at the deer trails, droppings
and beds. The north side of that field had a
more open collection of hawthorne and
grasses, good warm weather cover, and again
plenty of deer trails and other sign. The third
side opened onto at least a hundred acres of
tall mixed timber, and the fourth bordered a
small highway for easy access.

Even before the corn fully ripened that
year deer began gathering to take advantage of
the rich feeding. They built trails into that

field from all directions that began to resemble minature four lane highways, and I’m surprised that I didn’t fill my tag during the first
weeks of October.

But except for the timber side there was
nothing suitable for a tree stand so I spent
much of my time ground hunting, checking
wind direction at hunts beginning, dressing in
full camouflage with face paint, and taking a
bath in a deodorizing soap before scenting
myself up with a fox urine cover scent or
whatever else seemed promising. I saw plenty
of does, had several within 10-15 yards, and
reached easy range of a forkhorn who seemed
a little small. I passed on him.

There were big bucks as witness their
tracks among the corn rows, but they were
slipping in and out before dawn and holding
up in the thicket where they were safe as in
church. I couldn’t seem to win. Luckily the
landowner held off harvesting that field until
well after gun season and eventually there
came a stormy Friday night with winds and
rain, a night when deer would feed only intermittently.

Morning brought chill weather and
a light misty sprinkle, one of those dawnings
when you KNOW deer will be running late,
and when shooting light arrived I was waiting.
I don‘t wait long.

A fat eight pointer materialized out of the
mist, easing almost silently through rain
moistened stalks, and starting warily at every
sound. But he didn’t see me and I’d already

drawn my Brown Bear compound at the first
sure sign of his presence. The broadhead sped
true and shortly thereafter I was dragging my
winter’s meat to the pickup. Thanks to standing corn.

Enamored Of Cornfields
There are more things to keep in mind,
once you’ve found an isolated cornfield that
shows obvious signs of use by whitetails.

First, it should be obvious that if you hunt at
dawn, deer will be coming out of com while
in the evening they’ll be heading in. S0 you
scout the surrounding land carefully, decide
where they’ll most likely lie up during the day
and plan your tree stand spot or ground blind
accordingly. It pays to have several to take advantage
of wind direction, then you can make
an on the spot decision as to which place is
best.

If you’re into driving for deer, you’ll find
standing stalks a real challenge, maybe more
challenge than you can handle. It’s a total
waste of time to drive a 100 acre field with
four or five men because, again, the animals
will simply circle. You’ll see one once in a
while, a glimpse here, a flashing tail there,
but any shots you get will be at shadows and
no good archer shoots at shadows. If you post
men outside the field in spots where the animals
are most likely to flee for safety, you’re
going to discover that when they leave corn,
they do so in high gear.

On one of the very few times I participated
in a cornfield deer drive, after assuring the
landowner that we’d ease down the rows and
not disturb a single stalk, we finally put out
three does and a forkhorn. The bowhunter
they ran past said, “They looked like bouncing
grey blurs and there was no chance to
make a certain hit. I let them go .”

Maybe you`re wondering at this point why
deer are so enamored by cornfields and
golden kernels of corn when they have long
acres of tasty acorns and other natural foods
that range from crabapples to sumac berries.
The answer is a simple one; like people, deer
are lazy creatures. Why roam around and for-
age as best you can, especially during late sea-
son when the lush vegetation is long gone,
when you can step into a cornfield and have
unlimited ears of high energy, extremely nutritious
corn. Admittedly, acorns have higher
food value, ounce for ounce, than corn.

They’ve more protein and more fats to go with
a high carbohydrate rating, but it’s the carbohydrate

that provides energy to burn and
maintain body warmth in cold weather, and
corn has plenty. They can probe under an oak
all morning for a fist full of acorns, using almost
as much energy as they gain, but every
stalk in a cornfield has at least one ear and
usually two of tasty provender. Wouldn’t you
make the same choice?

Every archer knows there’s no sure thing
in deer hunting. Whitetails are wild and wary,
have fine sight and chokebore noses, and their
ears can pick up a chipmunk’s belch at 50 ·
yards. But there is one situation in cornfield
hunting that comes close to being a fish in a
barrel situation, and I’ll pass it on for those
hunters who can handle the patience and slow,
careful hunting it demands.

This method won’t work well during the
early season when whitetails move in and out
of com at random. They may feed in com
early in the season, but they seldom lay up for
the day there. But in late season when other
cover is sparse and leaves have fallen to ex-
pose the thickets and usual hiding spots,
they’ll often spend their whole day in corn;
Even more so if they’re being hunted hard. So
you wait for dry conditions and a nice, steady
breeze.

The wind blows through yellowed stalks
then, with a constant rustle that effectively
dampens out whitetail hearing. That steady
wind also limits their sense of smell to one
direction. So picture a late field of standing
com with good cover around, a steady, directional
wind and an archer who feels sure
there’s a good buck or two in there. He heads
upwind and starts walking.

I’ve practiced the business myself more
than once, but I still remember one archer ·
who took his biggest buck ever that way. He
said, “I started in with real care, just step by
step with plenty of time to look up and down
each row. I went about 100 feet that way with-
out seeing anything, then I peeked up and
down one row and saw two deer about 75
yards away. I glassed them with binoculars
and saw they were both does, lying down and
facing away from me. They didn’t even see me
as I slipped across to the next row, probably
because the stalks were tossing in the wind
and they didn’t pick up movement.

“I went another 50 yards before I saw a
grey hump on the ground that turned out to be
a six pointer, and I was tempted then. But it
was still early and he didn’t see me either. I
could always come back. I was clear out in the
middle of the field when I saw a dandy. He
was lying down too, and I could see that bone
white rack. The binoculars said he was a 12
point and I wanted that one bad.

“So I backed up eight or ten rows down-
wind and eased along to where I figured I was
about opposite, then I stepped up a few rows
and saw him just six or eight yards away in an
area where the stalks were thin. He never saw
me very carefully draw the bow and I bet he
never even heard the string snap. That was the
biggest and easiest buck I ever got.”

You can argue ethics here, the question of
shooting a buck that’s lying down, but personally
I have no problem with the situation. To
approach a good sized animal that close on
foot, even with the wind to help, requires at
least as much skill as it does to properly place
a tree stand and take your shot from there.
Either way y0u’re shooting an unsuspecting
animal, and that’s what most archers strive to
do.

That’s only my opinion and you can make
your own decision, but either way you’ll find
cornfield hunting worth the effort, and
there’ll be many a freezer filled with venison
this fall by hunters who find the right situa-
tion. Look for fields with good cover around,
set up ambush sites early, walk the rows late in
the season on windy days and I’m betting
you’ll put a fork in venison steaks, too.

They’re the closest I know to a sure thing, and
worth checking anytime. Those golden kernels
are more than a simple money crop,
they’re also a whitetail heaven.

>>—->

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Published by archerchick on 25 Jul 2012

When The Bulls Won’t Bugle – By Wayne Van Zwoll

Archery World October 1987

When the Bulls Won’t Bugle
By Wayne Van Zwoll

The chase led down a rocky wash, then into the dark timber at the head of
a deep draw.  The draw became a canyon farther down, beyond where he
could see.  If they went there he wouldn’t follow.

The sun was up now, and he was warm.  They would be, too, and he’d not see
them in the open anymore.  He hurried down, sliding, grappling with the buckbrush,
snatching at the trunks of the trees to slow his descent.  He wasn’t being quiet, but they
wouldn’t wait for quiet people.

Meanwhile the elk were being democratic about things.  Milling about at a cut in the canyon
side, they drank from a small spring in turn, scrambled up onto the rock trail that hung
like a crooked string along a point that divided the forks of the drainage.  They were lower
than he was, and the canyon gaped beneath them.   There were six of them, all bulls, Bachelors,
they’d spent the dawn hours nibbling in a meadow on top, jousting with each other.  Velvet hung
in tattered strips, but the animals were fat.  They’d wandered off the hill into the head of the draw
when the sun got yellow.

He’d like to have got into them then, but they were too far.  He’d watched them with his glasses, his belly
pressed into the grass.  When they went over the lip he’d follow.  But then things had gone wrong.  Another
hunter had moved in from the west, and they’d smelled him just at the wrong time.  He was 20 steps
from one when this other fellow moved in, 20 steps and the last inch of draw.  The elk left.

Then he’d bumped them once himself, run too hard to catch up and got caught in the open.  They were
patient because they hadn’t been bothered much this summer and didn’t know about arrows, or didn’t
remember.

Now, thought, thye were moving out, Enough was enough.  Besides, the sun was up.  The end came at the
spring, after most of the bulls had left and were strung out on the trail around the point, headed for the bowels
of the canyon.  A yearling bull was waiting his turn and a five-point was standing over the water thinking that
maybe he didn’t want to leave just yet.  That’s when the first arrow hit the rocks.

He didn’t pay it much mind because he didn’t know what it was.  Then the next arrow rushed at him and it
was deflected.  It went deep and he ran and he got up into the sun on the rocks above the trail.  Then
everything went askew and he lost control and fell over and was dead.

THE RIGHT PLACES

It took me quite awhile to find that elk in the thick gut of that draw.  He’d tumbled a long way.  But it hadn’t
taken me much time at all to find him in the first place, in that meadow on top with the other bulls.  I was
thankful for that, because when the elk aren’t bugling finding them can be a real chore.  To spend more time
hunting and less time looking for elk, it’s important that you look in the right places in the right way.

Here are some things to keep in mind when you are trying to find those silent bulls,

First, know whey they’re silent.  If you’re hunting before rut, before bulls are interested in cows and are
still bachelor groups, don’t expect them to bugle.  They don’t do it for the fun.
When the rut is over and the bulls are tired, they seperate from the cows, but this time they’re more apt
to go off alone and just rest in a thicket near lots of food.  Solitary and secluded, often in heavy timber and
moving very little, such elk can be very hard to find.  If they bugle at all it will be at random.  They won’t move and
they’re unlikely to pull you in with a string of answers to your elk whistle.

Sometimes elk can be silent during the rut.  In areas where the hunting pressure is extreme, bulls hear enough fake
challenges and run into enough bugling hunters to know what is real and what isn’t.

Sometimes they don’t even care to find out, but pack their cows off to some steep, jungly corner of the mountains as
soon as they hear the first note.  Outrider bulls that have been kicked around a little learn it’s best to approach a harem
silently, to find out something about the bull doing the screaming, if not to make sure it’s really a bull in the first place.

During rut- and even out of rut – elk don’t always need a reason to act as they do, and it may seem a waste of time
to find out why elk are silent when they probably haven’t reasoned that through themselves.  Still,

knowing why, or at least postulating why,
rnakes a difference in how you hunt. If you are
to End elk consistently it must.
If you’re going to be hunting early, before
rut, remember that you’re as likely to find
several bulls together as to find a single bull.
l`ve taken two bulls in August. Both were in
bachelor groups. Of those shot during September, most were alone.
Bulls in groups are tough to find early because one group may hold all the bulls from
many square miles of rugged country. If you
don`t find that group you can do a lot of hiking
for little reward. It’s imperative, then, that
you know how to read sign and know enough
about elk habit to at least make a good guess
as  to where the elk will be. Being familiar
with the country is certainly helpful; barring

large-scale disturbance, the same late summer
range will be favored year after year.
When you go early, spend at least a day
just covering ground. Look for fresh elk droppings; disregard sign you think is over a
couple of weeks old. Anything moist is fresh,
of course. Black droppings are older than
brown, but in hot, dry country elk pellets turn
black very quickly. Really old sign will be
leached to a tan color and cracked on the surface,
Concentrate on areas where elk forage:
grassy hillsides, small mountain basins,
openings in the timber where the light can
spur grass growth. Most elk droppings will be
when where the animals eat, albeit they chew
their cud in their beds. Remember, too, that
elk have night-time as well as day-time beds,
and that they may spend half their hours

lounging in a feeding area. They don’t use the
rims and canyon bottoms too much in summer,
because then there isn’t much reason to
seek security cover. You’ll find lots of old
droppings in some pretty inhospitable places,
but don’t look long there for fresh sign.
Tracks will be hard to find in the rims,
even if the bulls are using them, so look in the
meadows, where the elk are likely to feed and
wallow. Look for muddied water in the prints
in wallows. Examine grass and sedge stalks
that are bent (not broken) and have not sprung
back. Fresh rubs on small trees will be white,
often running with sap. Any velvet you see
will likely be very fresh. Use your nose, too,
to sniff beds and trails. Elk have a strong
smell even when they aren’t rutting and if you
can sniff them you can be sure they’re close.
Listen, as you go, for branches snapping in
canyons and thickets, for the whine of calves.
Though the bigger bulls will likely be in their
own group, they may travel or lounge near a
herd of cows, and some mature bulls will be in
the cow—calf bunches.
Last season I saw a big herd of elk on one
of my favorite August ridges. In fact, it was
the biggest herd I’ve yet seen in summer.

There were over 250 animals. Of the 23 bulls
in the group, though, only two were not year-
lings. The big bulls were off by themselves
playing cards, somewhere. I didn’t find them
till later in the season.
It’s very hard to hunt a bull in a big group
of cows like that. Too many eyes are watching
for you, too many ears listening. The wind, it
seems, is always blowing to some animal, even
if the one you want is in the perfect spot for a
stalk. Hunting the harems later is tough, but
pre-rut bulls are more sensible, and they take
their cues readily from the lead cow. Harems
tend to be smaller than late-summer herds of
cows, too. For these reasons it’s a good idea to
try to find a small bunch of bulls, or perhaps a
fragment of cow herd that holds an acceptable
bull.
You can break these big elk herds into
more manageable ones, all right, and it’s a
tempting thought. Still, if you frighten more
than a few animals or give your scent to the
herd you’re apt to move all the elk into
tougher country. That happened to some
friends recently. They broke a big group of elk
on opening day. The animals had been using

 

some rolling ridges that were halt timoereu
and quite easy to hunt. After a few arrows had
been shot the big herd split into several
smaller ones — and all went down into steep,
thick canyons. Thereafter the elk bedded in
those canyons and foraged on very steep, open
hillsides, always in a place that had a commanding

view and good wind coverage.
It`s better not to split such herds or even
hunt them. Nibble at the fringes, if you must.

But when a big herd vacates an area it will
likely take with it any chance you have of finding
a small group of elk and will alert any
resident bachelor bulls.

When you go early, take your bugle. but
don’t use it a lot. A blast or two from ridgetop
at dawn and dusk won’t alarm elk, and it may
bring an answer from a bull that doesn’t have
anything better to do. Be aware, though, that
anytime you bugle you tell the elk where you
are. If they investigate and find out what you
are they will be much harder to approach
later, and harder to talk to.


Even when the rut is on, it’s a good idea to
be conservative with your bugling. Lots of
hunters bugle better that I do, and there are a
lot of different views on how best to whistle a
bull. But in areas where bulls have heard
hunters before you must be careful you don`t

say something you’ll regret later.
For example: One of my hunting partners
is quite handy with a bugle. Last year he was
working some shrubby cover at timberline in
a favorite elk basin. He decided to bugle.
lmmediately he was answered. The bull came in
so fast my friend had no time to set up or move
to better his wind coverage. The bull got well
within shooting range, but presented no good
shot and left when he winded my partner.

Bugling bulls are unpredictable. Setting
up takes time. It may be that the stand you so
painstakingly search for and prepare will be

of no use if the bull that answers decides to
stay where he is. Nonetheless, if you aren’t
prepared to receive a bull, it’s better not to
invite him.
Once in a while you can find a ridgetop
viewpoint that will serve as a launchpad when
you bugle to locate a bull. If you don’t think
the bulls will come to you or even answer you
more than once or twice, bugling from the top
can put you into elk. A bull that answers
should be stalked immediately, and if you run
the first half you’ll just get there quicker.
Don’t bugle after you get an answer, and don’t
stay on the ridge to see if he will talk to you
unless you are set up to receive him or intend
to come to him as another bull.
Remember that elk cover ground quickly
at a walk, and if the bull that answers you is
moving you may have little time to home-in
before he moves into oblivion. One bull that
bugled at me from 400 yards was about a mile
farther down the ridge when he finally took
my arrow. I had run as much as I dared, and
the footing was good. He was just walking.
Fortunately, he bugled a couple more times
and gave me a line to follow.
If the bulls have become call-shy in the
area you hunt during the rut, try using your
bugle more sparingly, moving into the elk as

you would stalk a deer. You might see more
lone bulls, and you’ll almost surely boost
your chances of penetrating a harem to get to
the herd bull. Bugling just enough to locate
the animals is especially useful if you, like
me, do not sound as much like an elk as an
elk.
Hunting after the rut is particularly tough.
By late October even the most garrulous bulls
are silent, and they’re tired. The bigger the
bull, in fact, the more tired he is. He’s spent
from two to three weeks gathering his harem,
servicing it and keeping other bulls at bay. He
hasn’t eaten much, has drawn his strength
largely from stored lipids in his liver. He’s
ready to lie down and eat. He doesn’t want to
play games with hunters, and he’ll go wher-
ever he thinks hunters won’t. He knows lots of
places.
You know the kind of places he ’s thinking
of: the lodgepole jungles, spruce thickets, al-
der tangles. If there were just a few of these
pockets you could hunt them all and eventu—
ally find him. But there are many square miles
of good security cover, and you have to admit
that if they were vulnerable the rifle hunters
would kill a lot more elk and you wouldn’t see
as many bulls as you do. So the thick stuff is
good for both you and the elk. Still, how do
you hunt it?
There’s really no secret here. Unless
you’re blessed with a tracking snow, you must

just work your way to a bull. Think first of all
the places you’d want to be if all you wanted to
do was eat and sleep and not be bothered.
That will eliminate a lot of country. Next,
don’t hunt that country you’ve eliminated —
no matter how pretty it is or how far you can
see or how many elk used it in August. You
can’t spare the time, frankly, to hunt easy
places. Not if you want to kill elk.
Using the elevation to advantage, either si-
dehilling or hunting up half a day and down
half a day, work the mean stuff. Be extremely
conscious of the wind. Be quiet, too. Lone
bulls are a lot more alert to snapping twigs
than were those herded elk you stalked in Sep-

tember. You won’t see many elk now, and the
going won’_t be easy; but this is hunting at its
best. Any bull you arrow this way will be a
trophy. It is a challenge few hunters accept,
Whenever you hunt the silent elk, recog-
nize that you’ll see fewer animals than when
they’re vocal. A positive outlook is crucial,
and you won’t have it if you’re thinking about
all the elk you should be seeing or the latest
magazine article that described a small band
of archers fighting off hordes of screaming
bulls. Face reality. Hunt harder. Smile. Shoot
a grouse for supper. Remember that the elk
are close. Your scouting and knowledge of elk

habit and the country have confirmed that. All
you need to do is find out exactly where they
are.
A P.S.
A post—script: There are some things that
all elk hunters should know and successful
hunters do know. They’re simple, logical
things and easy to remember. Oddly, a lot of
hunters act as if they never heard of them.
They’re basic things, the kind of things you
never talk about with other hunters because
you think they’ll think you’re talking beneath
them.

The truth is, elk are very basic creatures,
and they survive by doing a few basic things
very well. A lot of hunters are much too so-
phisticated to kill elk regularly. If you want to,
though, review these things:
Buy good binoculars and use them like
you’d use your eyes. This is especially impor-
tant when the elk don’t bugle because you
can’t locate them with your ears. Those bulls
don’t switch off their senses, ever. Make the
most of yours. Give yourself lots of time to
glass from ridges, particularly at dawn and
dusk, and glass the heavy cover around you
when you work the thickets. You could spot
the antler tine of the biggest bull you’ll ever
see.
Get yourself in shape. In the off-season
keep exercising regularly. It should hurt a lit-
tle and should be a real nuisance. If it isn’t you
aren’t doing enough. Often I’ve been just too
late to catch a bull passing through an open-
ing, too tired to get around a feeding herd in
time to beat the thermals. Had I been a little
harder, I might have taken more elk. Some of

the bulls I have shot, certainly, would have
escaped had I not been as fit as I was. Many
times your physical condition will decide the
climax of your elk hunt. It’s different than
stand-hunting whitetails.
Shoot well. If you miss you might as well
not have hunted. Missing or crippling is
worse than not shooting. If you pass up a shot,
you`re making a judgement. The hunt is be-
hind you, and though the climax might not be
what you had hoped, you have come that far.
To miss is to fail. True, it is to fail in only a
small part of the hunt. But it is a crucial part.
Once a brakeline ruptured on the pickup I was
driving. I was going quite fast. It was a little
failure, but it carried big implications. Prac-
tice as much as you possibly can, know your
range limits and stick to them. Most of the
time you can get closer if you really try, any-
way.
If you hunt early, be prepared to take good
care of your elk. Elk cool slowly and they
must be skinned and quartered as quickly as
possible to avoid unpleasant flavor in the
meat. I’ve shot bulls when the night air cooled
only to 60 and day-time temperatures reached
80. Frankly, the meat wasn’t the best I’ve had;
but it was edible because I worked quickly,
hung the quarters in the shade, kept them
clean and covered with cheesecloth. Washing
in cold water doesn’t hurt as long as the meat
dries soon. It could help in cooling, and it
might well be necessary to remove hair and
offal and other matter that would surely taint

the meat. If you pack your animal out on a
horse or your back, keep it away from sweat.
dirty clothes, camp fuel.
Your elk hunting gear should be in top
shape at least a week before you go, and it’s a
good idea to have spares of everything you
could imagine breaking or losing. Throw in a
rubber blunt or two if the grouse season is on.
Shooting a grouse with a rifle can scuttle an
elk hunt, but taking one with an arrow won`t
disturb other game and is a good way to keep
your distance eye and shooting muscles in
shape during the hunt. Don’t forget basic first
aid items, fire-starting kit, compass. Carry
them with you and accept the extra weight as
necessary insurance. <—<

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Published by Seven Springs on 17 Jul 2012

Bowhunters Open during the IBO World Championship

We’re happy to announce that if you are interested in participating in the Seven Springs Bowhunters Open on August 10 and 11, you do not need to be an IBO member. If you call the IBO, they will give you a Guest Pass to experience the fun at the greatest gathering of Bowhunters and Shooters in the World.

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Published by DJ on 29 Jun 2012

Have you ever wanted to really pattern the Big Game Animals you hunt?

To do that, you have to collect weather data, lunar data and solar data for the times you are seeing animals and the times you aren’t. Obsessive Hunting Disorder  does this for you.

You enter the location, time of day and the animal activity and all of the other data is automatically calculated for you. Create reports to pull the information that has been entered by you and many other hunters.

This is how you really pattern an animal!

You cant do it without Obsessive Hunting Disorder

Visit Today : www.obsessivehuntingdisorder.com

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Published by fasst on 28 Jun 2012

Levi Morgan Featured AT Chat!

                                                                Levi Morgan Featured Chat. 6/27/12 9pm EST

 

Bowmaddness–                Hi Levi, Have you archery hunted in PA this year if so have you had any luck?

Levi Morgan– I hunted in Greene county PA this past season with no luck…hunted public ground and it was tough…I killed a good one there a couple years ago though

Double S- Thank you Levi for all the things you do for the great sport of archery. That’s all. pass

Levi Morgan – Man I appreciate that….It’s been good to me

Ghost23– Levi, what is your greatest accomplishment in archery?

Levi Morgan– My greatest accomplishment in archery ……wow….that’s a good ???……It would have to be winning Louisville!

Ohio Mossy Oak– … Ohio Deer harvest numbers and deer/vehicle accidents have been on the decline for multiple years and many hunters are saying they are not seeing the deer they used to, and that herd numbers may be down overall .Not buck numbers, but in general……. I know you hunt and manage land in Ohio. Have you noticed anything of this sort? And how do you feel about increased cost for both Resident an non-resident deer hunters equally, and decreased antlerless bag limits?

Levi Morgan– I definitely feel that deer numbers overall are down in Ohio…but not buck numbers…I think it is due to the liberal rules on doe harvest jumping in the last couple years….I wish the tags wouldn’t go up as well….

PAbowhunter86– Levi, how many shoots do you attend each year?

Levi Morgan– around 15 or 16….its alot but I love competing ….all those are in a 6 month period

SierraMtns– Hey Levi, Any pointers for someone wanting to compete. I have done a couple 3D shoots. There seems like some many different types of competition. How did you get started?

Levi Morgan– I agree and think that there are way too many venues in this sport…..but I would say pick the one that you feel more confident in and the one that you can best practice for!

Levi Morgan– My dad was a huge hunter….and he introduced it to me….

SierraMtns– Cool…thanks

XFBrian– Do swackers really work like they say or is it just tv???

fasst– lol

Levi Morgan– Man if there is one product that I truly believe in…it is swacker I have no issues at all with them…from the design to toughness they are no doubt my favorite bhead….just stay away from the shoulder bone….the only deer I have lost was from a shoulder shot…but if u hit a deer just right in the shoulder with any bhead u r screwed….no need to hit that far forward with that big of a cut

XFBrian                – lmao thanks for your time

XFBrian                – and CONGRATS on the baby

YoungTNArcher– What is the longest shot you have taken at a target? What is your longest shot while hunting?

Levi Morgan–  200 at a target…….I don’t know if I should answer this but oh well…..120 on a mule deer!

Levi Morgan–  thanx xfbrian

YoungTNArcher– Did you hit the mule deer?

Levi Morgan–  Smoked it….but very controlled situation

buckeyeguy2299– BESIDES NAME THAT GAME:)…WHAT IS YOUR FAV HUNTING SHOW ON TV? AND WHAT ABOUT IT DO YOU LIKE?

Levi Morgan – Its Name The Game Jason…lol…and I would say the Drurys stuff…they are awesome hunters and I’ve been watching them since as long as I can remember…I’ve learned alot from them

buckeyeguy2299–  GREAT …….HAVE A GOOD NIGHT BUDDY AND TTYL

ferretboy–  First off, pleasure meeting you again and now my question: Many purists dont consider 3d real archery, we all know that you’re one of the best in the world at that game, how did it feel shutting down the naysayers by having such a huge indoor win and how proud were you to put that one into your vast and growing list of accomplishments? And congratulations on both the Championship and the new baby.

Levi Morgan–  3d is the toughest venue of archery….thats why so many great shooters dont shhow up….u actually have to think and plan…and manage…..and shoot…and judge….Indoors was awesome for me because I never practice that stuff and because people said the only reason I won was because of my yardage….you cant win a 3d on yardage alone

youngbuck98–  oh ok

Levi Morgan–  Indoors are tough because they are so easy everyone can compete…

Levi Morgan-  if that makes sense…lol

youngbuck98–  levi what method do you use to judge yardage?? do you look at the target or go bye the ground

Levi Morgan–  I use a little of both young buck….but mostly target

ferretboy–  total sense, i shoot both and perform better in 3d, for some reason i feel less stress, thank you for the answer

geezer047–  Hey, gonna be hot this weekend if you and Sam need a cold drink of water stop by Koty’s truck. Charlie

Levi Morgan–  Haha…no problem man…I may make Sam stay home in this heat…not good for being 7 months along

hrtlnd164–  Levi, which would you rather have. A 180&quot; buck or another World Championship…(and you can’t say both).

Levi Morgan–  Definitely a 180” buck…easiest one yet…haha

Levi Morgan–  heck a 160

hrtlnd164–  I’m with ya there

ironarcher–  Oh I’m not sure.. ok I guess I didn’t really understand the answer about judging yardage..

ironarcher–  or maybe I missed it haha

Levi Morgan–  I look at the target and study it for detail while taking alot of other things like lighting, terrain, etc. into consideration…if I’m still not confident I will check it with the ground to see if I get something different

ironarcher–  got ya thanks Levi

jrm81–  Who are some the guys that you just flat out enjoy shooting with in 3D and indoors? Also in your opinion, who are some of the up and coming archers that we should keep our eye on?

Levi Morgan–  Guys Like Darrin Christenberry, Nathan Brookes, Danny Mcarthy, Ken Lance, Chance B, and so many I cant name em all…….and a couple up and comers are Garrett Ayresman from WV that kid is awesome…..and Ty Adkins to name a couple….and Jeremy Elliot

masonbanta–  Did you just decide one day to start shooting the Pro stake or did you work your way up to it over the years?

Levi Morgan–  I’ve shot since I was 6 years old and worked my way to a win in the mens open class in the ASA when i was 13…I quit for a couple years and when I came back I was hungry to be the best of the best so I jumped right in

masonbanta–  Thanks Levi and good luck this weekend.

Levi Morgan–  thank u

rdraper_3–  Can’t really think of any questions right now. I’d just like to say congrats to you and Samantha and good luck in Marengo, OH

Levi Morgan–  thanks so much…really appreciate that

scott*devin–  ohh sorry, Levi do you like the Mathews monster series bows?

Levi Morgan–  Yea I do man…I have had my ups a downs with them by my ups have been amazing…..I love them especially for hunting….but I’ve also won 3 Worlds with a monster 7

sugice–  levi, first it is a pleasure to meet you and I really enjoy your show, now what was your most exciting hunt and which state has presented the most challenging hunt of your career and why?

Levi Morgan–  most exciting was the double double droptine from my dads farm in Ohio…no doubt that’s the most exciting hunt of my life…..most challenging is spot and stalk muleys in the Missouri river breaks of Montana….but that’s also one of my fav hunts….

sugice–  thank you, good luck this weekend and congrats to you and Samantha. If you ever get up to Maine look me up, I&apos;ve got some great hunting land available.

Leviticus–  Awesome…..MOOSE????

sugice–  absolutely!

sugice–  bear and some big bucks

sugice–  got my permit for a bull this October

Levi Morgan–  awesome

20ftup–  you bought it

tarheelmr7–  what target/lighting/terrain scenarios trick you the most? Can you pick one scenario and give a tip on how not to get my butt kicked by the yardage?

Levi Morgan–  Tarheel—-The one that gets me the most is if the lighting isn’t consistent…if its dark the targets look farther and if its bright the targets look closer…..so if it has been overcast all day and I’m calibrated for that, then all of the sudden the sun comes out and the target is bright…if I’m not careful I will shoot him in the knee…lol

Levi Morgan–  …see ya’

fasst–  lol

tarheelmr7–  thanks man. I’m gonna pm you. Hope to see you this weekend

Levi Morgan–  no problem

youngbuck98–  do you think a c4 is a good bow for target shooting or should I go with the apex 8, either one what would be the length on the front and back bar and how many weights to balance it out good, i shoot b-stinger premiere xl bars

Levi Morgan–  29″ draw and under I would go with c4…over that I would go apex 8….both good target bows….I would start with a 30″ front bar with about 4oz and a 12″ back bar with about 13-15oz

fasst–  I am going to run thru the names that haven’t had a chance to ask a question yet, before we double up. Levi only has a few more minutes slated for the chat!

youngbuck98–  ok thanks man,

Levi Morgan–  no problem

3Dblackncamo–  hey levi, what are your goals in 3D archery right now and how do I get you to Big Pine for some local 3D! good luck in metropolis

Levi Morgan–  I want to win shooter of the year for 3 more years in ASA and help make the organizations better…I’m gonna try to make it out at some point i enjoy shooting out there

AdvanTimberLou–  Levi, congrats on winning Louisville, I was there and see what I thought was the word “manimal” on your shooter belt, what is the meaning behind that?

AdvanTimberLou–  It could have been my bad eyes too, you guys shooting inside outs all day was cool to watch! :)

Levi Morgan–  Thats a nick name that Greg Poole gave me…he had that quiver made for me….he says im not all human and that I have to be at least half animal…lol…so he calls me the manimal

fasst–  lol

Fortyneck–  Hey Levi, thanks for your time, In your opinion what peep/sight housing/pin size combo is best suited for hunting at longer distances? Also do you have a favorite older model bowhunting bow that stands out with exceptional accuracy and/or shootability for those that can’t afford the absolute latest equipment.

AdvanTimberLou–  After seeing you shoot, you’re not human! Congrats again and congrats on the future addition!

JHENS87–  sounds like poole

Levi Morgan–  I would go with a 1/8 peep and either a .10 or .19 for pin size but if u can see smaller then I would say go for it….and for an older bow I loved the switch backs

GoosebyFLuFLu–  How long do you plan on shooting professionally? Also do you plan on shooting until you no longer are able to or until is no longer is fun? Thanks for taking the time to answer everyone’s questions.

Levi Morgan–  thanks lou

Fortyneck–  Thanks, BTW Manimal…great show

Levi Morgan–  I’m not real sure…I’ve got a little boy on the way and I can already tell that archery is taking a back seat…as it should….I am going to pray about it as time goes on and we will see what the Lord has in store…good question

GoosebyFLuFLu–  Thanks!

fasst–  good answer!

Levi Morgan–  thanks fortyneck

JHENS87–  Whats your hunting setup for whitetails this year? Any sidebar, lens, longer front stab normally seen in target shooting?

Levi Morgan–  I will be running same as usual for me…mr7 with a 15″ front bar and a 10″ back bar…..7 pin CBE tek hunter but no lense….also gonna use the Helium some I like that bow….especially in blinds

JHENS87–  nice, thanks

Levi Morgan–  no problem

NY911–  Levi – not so much a question, but a comment – thanks for taking a stance with the shenanigans at recent tournaments it really shows how you (and the other Pros who spoke up) care for the future of the sport. Your voice alone equals 100 of ours. Keep tearing it up and good luck on the future addition!

Levi Morgan–  Thanks…I want to do all I can to help these orgs out with rules and decisions…there is a small group of us pros that are starting to work together to get things changed for the better..

Wazz13– Outside of your Pro Hunter’s, what would be your go to arrow for hunting? What would be you goto arrow for 3D?

Levi Morgan–  I would go with a velocity 300 for hunting and TRiple xxxs for 3d

Wazz13                –   Thanks Levi, best of luck and God bless.

archerdad–  nothing just here to observe… congratulations on your good fortune levi the baby and the winnings

Levi Morgan–  thanks guys

hitman846–  In your travels, have you ever had a fan or someone you don’t know tell you “Dude, you should hunt with me for a few days at my place” and took them up on it?

Levi Morgan–  yes and no…not really that spur of the moment but I have had people email me with an idea for a hunt and within the month i was there…not to say I wouldn’t if the circumstance was right….haha

hoytbullrider–  Whats your best advice for a younger shooter , like myself, to get into 3d and indoor when only having a hunting rig (mathews monster) competition against the guys with bows setup just for 3D/indoor , sorry if its a wild question

Levi Morgan–  that’s a good question….I wouldn’t be scared to take my hunting rig to a tournament….that bow doesn’t know its not a tournament bow….while its probably a little more critical and maybe slower and doesn’t have all the bells and whistles it will more than likely still shoot awesome….just think of it this way…if you can beat them with a hunting set up then imagine what u could do with a tourney rig…..

Ohio Mossy Oak–  I wouldn’t mind getting in a follow up if he has time. Or maybe I can just hit him up on facebook?

hoytbullrider–  thanks

Ohio Mossy Oak–  On my last question regarding Ohio deer an tags etc. Did you say you’re in favor of a reasonable increase in cost for Residents an non-resident deer hunters?

Ohio Mossy Oak–  Also..I feel if you own over 50acres even as a non res you should pay less being a property owner…Just wanted to say that

Levi Morgan–  I obviously would rather the price not go up when I think of myself….but if the state is using the money to put back into conservation then a little raise would be ok with me….I agree with u on the landowner thing…I’ve been saying that for years…haha

 Levi Morgan–  not that it matters to them what I think

GoosebyFLuFLu–  Before I leave I wanted to thank you again for taking the time to answer my question and others as well.

Mathews122–  Levi do you have any idea what would be the best 3d tournament bow for a person witha 26 in draw

Levi Morgan–  no problem man. I wish we were all in a room so I could answer in more detail

Levi Morgan–  id say Mathews prestige

Ghost23–  What has been the best archery advice given to you, and how did it affect you as an archer:?

fasst–  OK Folks, let’s all give Levi a big hand for taking the time to host this chat!

JHENS87–  Yep thanks again Levi, been a very good chat

Mathews122–  Thank you

Christopher67–  Thank You

hoytbullrider–  thanks

Double S–  A Big thank you Levi!.

geezer047–  THANKS Levi, see you this weekend. Charlie

PAbowhunter86–  Thank Levi Congrats on becoming a dad no feeling in the world can compare!

20ftup–  Thanks Levi stay cool

fasst–  And Levi, please be sure to tell Greg that I was serious in my last text to him a little while ago!…..lmao

fasst–  levi, can you answer one last question for us please?

Levi Morgan–  Thanks guys I really enjoyed the questions

Levi Morgan–  yes sir

fasst–  go for it Ray

ferretboy–  Thanks a lot Levi Morgan

JHENS87–  Good luck, and try to avoid this 100degree heat your coming into as much as possible haha

rdraper_3–  What would you like to see improve in the IBO? I’d personally like to see the Pro’s shooting on the SAME courses as those in lower classes. I’ve only been in it for 2 years and really like it and plan on going to MBO next year, I’m currently in MBR but the only thing stopping me is the whole adjustable sight thing. I’m deathly afraid I’d forget to adjust it and miss a target.

Ohio Mossy Oak– Thanks alot levi. Getting insight on the deer herd here, from a highly managed ohio land owner like yourself means alot..An re-affirms many takes on the deer herd…Good luck this weekend. And god bless your an yours<

zakseppala– what would be the one tip you would give for someone looking to improve their shooting

rdraper_3-  Thanks for letting me get it in there Travis

Levi Morgan–  O wow ray?…thats a long list…lets see….pros shoot on sight….a legit awards ceremony….a qualification to get ur pro card….a shoot off….20 targets per day….a speed limit….etc etc etc

Levi Morgan–  Thanks guys and good night

rdraper_3–  Thanks Levi

Ohio Mossy Oak–  Speed limit !! YES! I love it

archerdad–  thanks for your time levi

Christopher67–  Thanks Levi

AdvanTimberLou–  Thanks again Levi and all the shooter of the year titles won’t mean a thing when you become the title of dad! Enjoy every moment of it! God Bless you and Samantha!

ferretboy–  Another class act, I have really enjoyed the last two featured chats

 

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Published by csd58 on 25 Jun 2012

Sure Loc Icon

Wanted to give everyone a heads up on the Sure Loc Icon. I recently purchased the Icon 550 with 9 inch extension from a web store. I was very excited to try this new site with the Zero Gravity technology. My enthusiasm was quickly met with disappointment. I put the site together and noticed the vertical frame did not seem square to the mount. The vertical form almost looked bent out from the bottom. My next issue was with how hard the site elevation adjustment turned to make adjustment to various distances (Although this did losen up after awhile.) The windage adjustment was just as difficult. However worse then that was the ‘Cant and third axis adjustment they were next to impossible to change by trying to use the knob, even with the set screw backed out all the way. The only way to make the adjustment was by Allen wrench but if this was by design why have the knobs? Here’s the last complaint and this is a killer. When the site was together there was actualy some play between the vertical form and extension bar. Not good for any site let alone a micro adjust target site. So I called Sure Loc the only thing I can say is there customer service was worse then the site. I was greeted by an automated answering system that told me if I was calling between business hours (8:00 am to 5:00 pm) they were experiencing high call volumes. Which I guess occur all the time because no human did ever answer the phone between those hours. I called several times and left a voice message as instructed. They never returned my call so I shipped the site back to the dealer and purchased an Axcel. I bought my first Sure Loc about 18 year ago and loved it but that was back when Steve Gibbs was still running the company God rest his soul he must be turning in his grave.

 

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